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40

It's not 2D, but have you considered Google Sketchup? It has a bit of a learning curve, but can be quite powerful. And of course it is free.


20

See this question. Google Sketchup seems to be a good option if you don't want to pay big bucks. Also, here's a tutorial for framing layout in Sketchup.


11

I personally use Google SketchUp to model both the interior and exterior of our house. It may not have the depth of features you're looking for but if you're going for open source freeware that's pretty usable out of the gate you can't go wrong. As a side note, I have seen some people use Blender to do modeling, though more for in-home manufacturing.


9

There is also Autodesk Homestyler (beta). I have not used it and it looks like a competitor to Google Sketchup (so not 100% 2D) but looks like it might give you want you want when laying out your basement.


7

You need to learn to use Components in SketchUp; they do exactly what you want. They do not "stick" to other parts of your model and won't affect other lines/etc but you can still snap to them when drawing. Also, you can go into a component and edit it, and the changes will be reflected in all the copies you have made of that component (or, you can break a ...


6

For solid 2D performance I've always been a fan of Microsoft Visio. I use it for everything from electrical layouts to micro electronics signal flow to civil engineering sketches. The learning curve is minimal if you've ever used any other Microsoft productivity suite. You can also download oodles of templates and design objects, as well as import images, ...


4

Sweet Home 3D runs in Java on Linux, and Windows. It is very easy to use and a good tool for a quick, "90% perfect" sketch. Very good for indoor sketches. For outdoor sketches I suggest Inkscape. Sometimes I use Inkscape, because I can draw things there much faster then in any CAD program. Of course I do not have the CAD features like "calculate area" and ...


4

Graph paper. Seriously. Here is what I did to layout my kitchen (after trying sketch up): Measure the space. Outline your walls on graph paper 1 square = 1 foot. Make a few copies of this, and save the original. Make your appliances as little cutouts, or, just draw out on your draft-copies of graph paper until you like what you have. Unless you do this ...


4

I use the open source QCad software, which is available for several platforms. I use the Linux version (Ubuntu) but also tested the Mac OSX version which is time limited. The application is a little bit disappointing if you think in terms of line/shape primitives such as in usual vector based drawing software. Initially I think this kind of software was ...


4

I used 3D Home Architect several years ago to design my basement. I bought an older version for less than 20 bucks. It worked well. I would check out their newer version.


4

Sketchup might seem a little intimidating at first, but it is very easy to learn and use. There are a lot of great tutorial videos online. Also there are tons of free models available for furniture, fixtures etc. I have tried a few specialized 3D home modeling programs. They all have a learning curve much steeper then sketchup and at the same time often ...


4

SketchUp Pro allows direct export to DXF. Sketchup (free) allows you to export DAE, which can be converted via FBX to DXF. See, e.g.: http://www.cadforum.cz/cadforum_en/qaID.asp?tip=6416


3

So far all the arduino/home automations I have seen are custom built. We are planning on using Domotic Home in our hacker group.


3

Draftsight is a free autocad equivalent from Dassault who make the high end solid works (and the seriously high end Catia if you even need to design an A380)


3

You could try creating your own plug-ins using the Google Sketchup Ruby API. You may also be able to find some useful ones that others have created, this site offers some and I'm sure a Google search will revile other sites with similar offerings like this one. Google Sketchup API Documentation Google Sketchup Community Forum Here is another good plug-in ...


3

There is a question on WebApps for web applications to do this.


3

This isn't exactly what you're looking for, but I would suggest that you try Autodesk Homestyler. An example in design mode And a feature that renders your design into almost life like pictures!


2

-FreeCAD (Hard 3D, most precise) -SketchUpBIM (Moderate 3D, less precise) -Floorplanner (Easiest 3D, least precise) (allows one project for free) I've used all three of the above and settled on SketchUpBIM; fully measuring and designing my 100 year old house in 3D. It took a while to do, most of the time spent learning the software, but I've found it ...


2

here is the other idea how to make component to goggle skecthUp Once you make your own design by goggle skecthUp, after you done your design, capture them all the way down,then right click from your mouse,then click make component,then name it/description/create/ then go to statistic/ then save as/ go to folder where ever you want to save your component.if ...


2

You should give Sweet Home 3D a try, http://www.sweethome3d.com/index.jsp. Its not perfect but it does satisfy your requirements. You can also convert Google Sketchup designs into native SH3D objects.


2

Good roundup of tools from here: http://www.charlesandhudson.com/archives/2010/07/3d_virtual_room_planning_tools.htm A couple that stand out, both run in your browser, and allow drag-and-drop of furniture and appliances, measurements on walls, 3D renderings, etc. Autodesk Homestyler MyDeco 3D


1

Another open source solution for you might be www.jubito.org.


1

Did you have a look at FreeDomotic? You may be impressed by the flexibility and the polyvalence of the protocol and the core engine.


1

Look up a video demo for the LinuxMCE project. (Be sure to watch the video, it's hard to really "get it" until you've seen it in action.) Pretty impressive IMHO.


1

Another open-source project: http://majordomohome.com/


1

I have tried CatStd http://www.cadstd.com/ some. It works OK, but I'm not well versed in it. It does save in dxf format. When I did my basement, I used an older version of 3D Home Architect. It was extremely easy to use, but I don't remember if it saved in dxf format.


1

I tried using Punch Home Design for my renovation. It was ok, but really slow by the time you chucked in a lot of details. My neighbour, who is in the building industry and managing all aspects of her renovation, used Sketchup. Having seen the quality of her drawings I'd definitely go the Sketchup route. As for Blender - not unless you already know it ...


1

SketchUp is good, but Blender is also a possibility. As far as getting someone to do it for you, I wouldn't know the best place for that. In terms of cost, it depends on how good the person is and how much detail you want. A rough visualization would take only a little bit of time, but more detailed stuff would take quite a while. A little warning, ...


1

try to go here as well, is good for the beginner user http://sketchup.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=116174&cbid=107x69sr2freo&src=cb&lev=index


1

I used 3D Home Architect several years ago. It worked well and was inexpensive. As a matter of fact, I got it to design my basement.



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