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11

The first thing that comes to mind is to: Pick up all of the tiles Excavate a few inches under where they were Put some small gravel down and compact Put some paver sand down and compact Reinstall the tiles Another way to go would be to lay a bed of mortar down over some gravel. That would lock them in really nicely as well.


8

I would say 10 or 11 bags (depending on how sloppy you are). 0.2 * .05 = .01 .0929 / .01 = 9.29 bags Since you never get perfect yield from a bag, I would personally go with 11 bags.


8

That is not normal or acceptable workmanship. The correct response to a foundation that far out of specification is to require the foundation contractors to rip it out and try again, or not get paid. Clearly that point was missed. The larger problem for you is that you are already entered into a contract with an incompetent, lying builder. I'd have your ...


7

This is done all the time in slab-on-grade houses. The slab is there to give you a nice surface to park on, but is not required for the structural integrity of the garage. So, sure, go right ahead.


7

Are the walls insulated? If not, do that first. Most of the heat escapes there...especially the part nearest and above the ground level. With a fully insulated wall, you might not even need to insulate the slab. in MN we insulated our walls and then left the concrete floor as-is (stained it). Only on the coldest winter days did we need to turn on the ...


6

Any place that sells pre-built sheds in your area would likely have advice on site preparation for delivery. I don't know what the soil's like in your area, but if you're going to hit bedrock before 42", it'd likely be easier to put in a slab; If you're likely to hit lots of tree-roots, the slab might be a better choice (so you don't kill a tree, and have ...


5

If it was poured onto an already existing slab, I would try separating it from the slab first to see if it can be broken away and leave the floor intact. Note: The pad should weigh about 815 pounds (370 kg) so light duty efforts are inappropriate. Obtain two heavy steel digging bars like this along with some scrap 2x4s or similar. With heavy gloves on, ...


4

You can install an interior weeping system similar to what you would normally do on the outside, but without the waterproofing. Start by jackhammering out about two feet of floor around the edges of your garage, as close to the walls as you can get. Dig down until you reach dirt, and if that's not at least two feet down, keep going. Now, put down a couple ...


4

thank you so much for the advice and comments. The inspectpr came by yesterday and confirmed our concerns! He is going to fail the framing inspection and has provided a write up for all the items we were questioning. Keeping our eyes peeled for any issues moving forward.


3

If you don't have gutters and the grading around your house isn't sloped away, I'd start there. It's relatively cheap to do and will eliminate most problems. It's also nice, if you have a door at the bottom of a roof edge, to not enter under a waterfall. Once you've done that (or if it's not possible to fix the grading) and the foundation is still wicking ...


3

Yes, it's a vent for a toilet. If it were an in-floor shower, you might see a P-trap and vent, but the toilet has the trap included in the fixture. The reason you see the vent here and not other locations is that a sink will be vented starting in the wall rather than inside the floor, and the toilet is often after the sink, making the line from the sink to ...


3

If I were a buyer I would beware. Why is the house frame not firmly on the foundation? 2" off the slab is more than half the width of the 2x4 base of a wall.


3

If your shower isn't sealed behind the tiles the water can leak past the tile and grout down into the space. Very common as most builders only use green board and put tile up over the top. This is asking for troubles down the road. The drain could also be leaking as you believe. In that case plug the drain at the surface and take a shower. If you see water ...


3

It's possible the water is getting around your shower, possibly where the tile meets the tub or pan (if you have one), or behind the fixtures, or even around the door (if any). I would check all of these and recaulk where appropriate before going in for wholesale destruction. Try splashing water by hand/bucket on areas you might suspect and see if that ...


3

The best bet may be to build a frame around the area you want your pool. This can be made from either 4x4 pressure treated timbers or pressure treated landscape ties. These can be attached by drilling and screwing through them into the cedar that is already there or by drilling into the concrete to hold stakes (you can use large galvanized nails) that go ...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


2

Concrete will crack naturally on its own unless it is given a place to crack such as control joint or expansion joint. As the concrete is curing it is heating up and expanding. In the summer time, I have seen the slab crack before being able to walk on it. Regarding footprints, it is tacky. However, the roughness can actually help the concrete and ...


2

A blind person could of poured better than that! Looks like the pour had too much water in the mix. When too much water is added, the aggregate sinks to the bottom and weakens the final product


2

You can float wood flooring installs over concrete. Moisture is your primary enemy here, and uneven concrete will also be evident in the finished result. I would consider painting on a moisture barrier, and then using a moisture/sound/mold/mildew/pad atop that. You should absolutely glue the joints. Set the first three courses straight and true and let the ...


2

Putting tile over a painted surface can be risky. Sure looks like removing all that paint would be a chore and maybe hazardous (lead based paint if pre 1978). We have put tile over such surfaces by roughing it a bit and putting a scratch coat of "floor patch and leveler" over the entire surface. This is a good bonding agent on stable subfloors. Another ...


2

If you are not planning to accommodate a 60 tonne Abrams tank in the room, it will be OK. However, do make sure that the water-proofing under the slab where the cut is made is not punctured. If it is punctured, it must be sealed again so that you don't get a wet streak popping up in your new floor. Structurally, the trench in the concrete will not pose ...


2

This is not going to be the answer you wanted to hear, but here goes. Although I cannot see the cracks up close, it appears that the cracks were created by the floor flexing in a fairly straight line. The cracks wander in a band about a foot wide with some parallel and joining cracks. My first plan of attack would be to remove a rectangle of the damaged ...


2

If you use a tub with an above floor drain, you can finish the floor flush. If you use a below floor drain, you should at a minimum put down poly, seal the edges with a sealant and cover with several inches of pea gravel. If you want to insulate a bit, excavate a couple more inches and put down some XPS foam over the poly and then put the gravel over it.


2

This is very likely a drainage issue. I would check the following things: Does water drain away from the house near this room? Are plants growing right up next to the foundation? You might want to put a buffer of 10" of rock (4-6" deep) next to the house. Since the house has vinyl siding you need to peek under the siding and see if you have moisture ...


2

Back in the day, at least my day, the building code allowed for a maximum of a 1" corbel (extention). I do not see any cracks in the photo that suggests shifting has occurred. If there is a basement or maybe not, while the foundation is laid, or in the case of concrete, while it is poured, the top of the wall can rack out of square. The break between the ...


2

Could there be a hidden floor drain in the area? It wouldn't explain why the timing is so regular, but it might be connected to something that does. I've dealt with a similar come-and-go odor problem in a commercial buidling that ended up being a 4 inch open floor drain that was just carpeted over when the building was turned into offices. That drain line ...


1

It's a piece of metal that sits on top the window sills to either side(10cm) and into the room about 5cm. I ended up just drilling another hole 2 cm out from the original holes and it wasn't there. I guess it's something to keep the weight off of the window frame.


1

Checking if various lines are straight may help explain why there's an overhang, but the question remains: Is this a huge problem? I don't know if we can fully answer this, as the devil's in the details. Are there additional floors? Is this in snow country, if so what's the snow load? What are the wind and seismic concerns? Is the wall 2" off a bearing wall? ...


1

I would start by evaluating the north wall section in several ways. First of all use a nylon string (such as a masons line or a chalk line). Stretch this along the outside edge of the slab to see of the original slab was poured straight all across the area where the wall overhangs the edge. Secondly repeat this test along the lower edge of the wall (outside) ...


1

The door heights don't matter, you can cut the bottoms to fit your flooring. However you do need to be close to the flooring level in whatever room(s) you are attached to. This wood may need to sit a while too and you may need to buy a moisture meter. Not knowing where you are getting it from or the exact grade it is hard to give advice on this. 3 weeks ...



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