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I believe Oregon uses the UPC as the basis for their state/local code. Under the UPC S traps are illegal, and that's what you have there. S traps are illegal because they can cause the trap seal (the water that prevents the sewer gasses from entering your house) to siphon out.


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There should be a mounting nut on the faucet stem which holds the faucet from below (under the counter). You will need to shut off water heater AND the water to the heater, and disconnect the supply pipes. Take the mounting nut off and pull the faucet out. When you look inside you will find something similar to the armature for pop-up drain plugs (I think). ...


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My double kitchen sink was installed (licensed plumber) as the picture, and seems to work fine (10+ years). I see no problems.


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As far as I know, having two separate sinks served by a single trap is not code compliant. You will need to replace the existing sanitary tee on the stack (inside of the wall) with a double sanitary tee. Normally, these double tees are used for adjoining bathrooms, so you can have a sink on each side of the wall, and share the same stack. In this case, you ...


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Consider all the dual-basin kitchen sinks... "If it happens, it must be possible."


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I have removed several of these sinks in the past when remodeling turn of the century homes. They were bolted directly to the studs with ¼” lag bolts that were ~2-1/2 – maybe 3” long. One had a bracket it slipped on to no screws through the back is this the type of bracket you have? that one had 4 nails into the studs. There was no other support. All of ...


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if the compression nut is tight, then you should not have a leak. dont put teflon on a compression joint face. you can, if desperate pull it apart and coat everything with a good layer of pipe dope and then reassemble. sometimes you may have a little corroded pore that this can fix. might be time to replace the supply line, nut and ferrule. other ...


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I have installed a number of this type of sink, and yes, the cabinet was bigger as you referred to. In the case of the picture you offer, the cabinet here looks as though the cabinet is simply short enough to keep the sink supported on top of the cabinet. If there is any gap to the neighboring cabinet, for what little will show, a filler can be added to ...


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Even though based on the sound of the trickling (based on the clearness and loudness near the double-trap) I suspected the"obstruction" was NOT in the floor but rather in the PVC drain pipes, based on the suggestions given here, I had resigned myself to the idea that I had more work to do on this project and waited for a good time to tackle it. The we still ...


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This looks all wrong. It looks like you have installed an adjustable P-trap upside down. The upside down "U" shaped piece attached to the pipe coming from the cabinet floor is supposed to be under the sink strainer. You need a proper tailpiece to attach to the strainer, which will come down into the "tall" end of the "U" shaped piece. The piece you now have ...


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just cut horizontally across the pipe that projects up from the cabinet base. cut it off about 3" up from the base, and then again about 2" up from the base. you have essentially removed a 1" section of pipe. then install a 1-1/4" fernco flexible coupling over the stub (up from the cabinet) and the remainder of the trap side stub. tighten the two gear ...



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