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16

Does it smell like sewer gas? If so, the sink trap is probably incorrectly installed, or more likely, the drain on an adjacent sink or dishwasher isn't properly vented. A "vent" is a portion of drain tube that lets air into the pipe to replace the water flowing downward. If there is no easy way to draw the air into the pipe (usually the vent just goes up ...


15

I'll echo the comment and say that you should make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without one, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it's ...


12

If the top item is near your kitchen sink then this probably an air gap for your dish washer drain system. The purpose of the air gap is to prevent back flow siphoning from the sink drain back into the dish washer. The lower item is definitely a timer unit. The dark colored thing under the timer dial appears to be a switch that has positions of OFF, FULL ...


11

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn't go down the drain)? If so, it's something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside, and/or look in the barrel of the faucet if you can to clean it out. You can also consider replacing the faucet. (I am assuming that since this only affects the ...


10

This is an air gap fitting for your dishwasher drain. You still need it. Its job is to ensure that waste water in your drain cannot backup into your dishwasher. Since the dishwasher isn't really water tight above a certain level, this eliminates the risk of raw sewage from ending up on your floor via the dishwasher. The air gap needs to be above the flood ...


9

That sludge is really just a mix of soap, water, skin cells, hair, tooth paste and all the other lovely stuff that goes down your drain. I doubt it is fungus. You can't really prevent it. There are all sorts of chemical and non-chemical mixtures you can try to clean it out, but I think removing the trap and cleaning it out is the best bet. If the trap is ...


9

Unfortunately, you have gotten yourself into a situation that is most likely going to require opening the wall to replumb the water supplies and possibly the drain. If you have access to the back through another wall, then you will not have to remove some tiles. If you don't have access, then you have to open it up from the front, not an easy job. The ...


9

You could also get one of these items and use it to transfer water from the sink tap to the Brita water filter/pitcher.


8

I would just replace the hose. You would probably have to take it apart to clean it anyway. I found replacement hoses for around $4. The directions seem fairly straightforward.


8

This might not be the answer, but for reference here is a problem that can occur if the plumbing is not installed properly. If you look at Fig. 3, this is what a proper drain looks like. You'll notice the orange line represents the water level in the system, the water levels out in the trap preventing sewer gases from entering the sink drain. In Fig. 1, ...


8

There are three things you need to consider: Support; Support; and Support! You NEED to find solid framing, probably uprights studs. You need serious screws/lag bolts into those studs. The sink is sure to come with mounting instructions as to exactly how to attach, but framing is a key. Masonry hanging may be possible, but you will need very deep, ...


8

For inexperienced DIYers; or any body not really comfortable with plumbing in general, the easiest option is to replace the whole faucet. While the faucet may be serviceable, stuck screws/bolts, proprietary disassembly steps, and difficulty finding replacement parts, make this a frustrating job for beginners. The new faucet should come with instructions ...


8

I would not recommend treating the area in the center rear of the sink as a "knock out". Trying to remove that portion of the sink with a hammer is foolhardy at best and could lead to splintered and cracked procelain on the top side of your sink. You would be far better off to apply a hole saw made for this type application. Here is an example of a diamond ...


8

Plumbers don't have x-ray eyes, sometimes they need to scope a pipe to find the problem. This does not make him a bad/lazy plumber. It just means he doesn't carry the scope in his truck, or the company has a special technician, who is the only one who runs the camera. Let the company scope the drain so they can see what they are dealing with, at which time ...


7

you could try removing the disposal and p-trap and cleaning those out. also, if your sink has an air gap under it, check to make sure that it's not stuck closed. if it is stuck closed, then when you sink drains, the water that's supposed to be in your p-trap is sucked out and sewer gasses can come up the sink.


7

A 1 1/4" female FIP adapter worked perfectly. As soon as I saw it, I was embarassed for not having thought of it earlier. I used some teflon tape, screwed the FIP adapter onto the adapter coming out of the wall, then just glued my 1 1/4" pipe directly into it. No reduction in pipe sizes, and 100% ABS parts.


7

Water pressure: This could be caused by higher than normal water pressure, that's why the noise changes when you turn on the sink (you reduce the flow to the shower). Solution: You could adjust the Pressure Reducing Valve for the whole house (if you have one), or install one on the line to the shower. Reducing Washer: In most newer shower heads, ...


7

Remove the trap from the tailpiece of the wash bowl and see if it needs cleaning. Check your main vent stack that goes through the roof for any obstructions. Verify that a bird has not made a nest there. If the sink was not installed by a plumber and has always had this problem, an air vent pipe may not have been installed or was installed incorrectly.


6

I've seen lots of houses that use standard kitchen cabinets as a master bath vanity -- around here at least it's considered an upgrade. A 36" height is not uncomfortably tall for anyone but small children (which is why they're only used in the master bath). My wife is 5'2" and loved the 36" double vanity in our old house.


6

If you remove the P-Trap (the S shaped pipe) from the drain of the sink, then yes, you need to plug that pipe up as well. The toilet drain has no trap - the toilet itself is the trap, and so it will need to be plugged regardless. For the drain to the sink, its often easiest to simply affix a permanent cap on the drain pipe and then cut that off when ...


6

looks like it needs bolts with very large rubber washers/gromets. even then i'd be afraid that the weight of the sink would just crack the mounting holes. the mounting holes you've got are 300mm apart, exactly as stud distance. use a stud finder. i have a hanging sink but it came with hardware: two vertical metal straps that you attach to the studs, the ...


6

Sounds like the drain after the disposal and connection to the other sink is partially blocked. I'd start with a drain cleaner that's designed for a partial blockage. In the kitchen, it's likely a buildup from cooking oils and grease that got into the drain. If that doesn't work, then you can remove the trap under your sink and remove as much crud from it as ...


6

If the sink is backing up into the toilet, then the clog is at or after the junction of the two in your drain lines. You'll have to snake the drain to remove the clog, and it will likely be beyond the reach of a standard toilet auger. You could remove the trap on your sink and attempt to snake it from there, or remove the toilet and run the snake down that ...


6

That's a drum trap, not a P-Trap. Be sure it's listed to comply with your code requirements. Looks slick anyway. You'll need a 45 degree chrome compression ell and maybe some extra pipe. You'll end up with the trap arm out of the drum running at a 45 degree horizontal angle to the wall. It will be cut quite short before it enters the ell. Upon exiting the ...


6

That isn't how gravity works. Drains like sinks are typically gravity drains where the water is drawn down into the drainpipe... by gravity. This is in contrast to things like washing-machines where the wastewater is pumped out into standpipes. In order to drain your sink via a standpipe above the fixture you'll need a drain pump or drain into a sump and ...


6

The tube of caulk should include drying and curing times. It will vary based on the product so you definitely want to go by the manufactures recommendation and not some general guideline you find on the web somewhere. You are not the only person who does not want to have to wait a day or two before using their sink and bathtub and the caulk manufacturers ...


5

There should have been a 'packing' in the stem assembly. This is usually a gasket or a series of gaskets that prevent water from seeping around the stem when the stem is in the off position. If the packing was in good shape (no cracks or brittleness) and was seated properly then I would say it's time to replace the whole fixture. In my past experience if ...


5

I use a combination of: Salt Vinegar Hot Water Dish Soap Over time, drains do begin to smell. There may be nothing blocking the drain, just some month old grease residue and remnants of the rest of the stuff that tends to go down the drain. Mix about 1/2 gallon of it together, with the following quantities: 1 cup vinegar 1/2 cup table salt (not ...


5

Plumbing for a sink is fairly standardized. The only thing you need to worry about is if you get a significantly deeper sink which pushes you below your drain line. Since you're also replacing the counter, there's no need to worry about finding a sink that will cover your existing sink area. Edit: Looking at the picture, I think you've got a good several ...


5

That's right about the sewer gases comming up to your bathroom, odors included. And that's from both the sink and toilet. Usually, it's the water in the S-shape in the plumping that plugs the hole, but during your remodeling your can plug the hole with anything that will be easy to remove afterwards, like a plastic bag with a rubber band, a plastic bowl or ...



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