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10

Spraying inside the hole with spray foam such as great stuff then after letting it dry using some wood putty seems to be the best solution I've found. As for woodpeckers, there are typically two possible reasons they've decided to decimate your house. First is insects. This was our main problem, we had a bad carpenter bee problem in our fascia and the ...


9

Adding a brick facade to the lower front of your house may not be as easy as you may think. Your contractor may have issues with installing a footing to support the weight and proper backing to attach the brick ties, not to mention building out all the window and door jams to match the new depth. This could be a very expensive change. As far as adding ...


6

Wow, not exactly what I'd call decorative, but whatever. You can fill those gaps with Bondo auto body filler. Just be sure to clean out any loose or chipped paint etc. Auto body willer actually works better than wood filler in exterior applications.


6

I really think a palm sander is the wrong tool for this job. Palm sanders are great for finishing with finer grits but lack the power to remove layers of paint quickly. The siding job you are starting would go a lot faster with a 5 or 6 inch dual action (DA) sander with prepunched velcro backed sandpaper disks. There are several nice ones for under $100 and ...


6

From the installation instructions Face nail with a 2" 6d or siding nail. For good measure you could put a dab of matching color caulk behind the nail head before you nail it all the way down.


6

The purpose of the extension on a frost free faucet is to get the valve itself in a heated space inside of your home so that it could never freeze (see the below diagram). If you only have an inch or so of insulation that's being penetrated by these plumbing pipes, it's likely that the valve would still reach the freezing point inside of your wall. So any ...


6

1. New roof. If you've got a leaky roof, you've got big problems. 2. New Siding. Since it sounds like you'll be adjusting the thickness of the walls, it makes sense to complete this job before anything else that will be installed on/in the wall. 3. New Gutters. Depending on what shape the gutters are in, this might move up or down the list. If they are ...


5

I like clear silicone caulk for this kind of job. It will remain flexible after curing, so if the pipe gets bumped or moved around it won't break or crack like expanding foam. And the clear caulk won't stand out since it cures to a translucent light grey color which is similar to the siding.


4

Werner makes ladder leg levelers (say that 5 times fast) that fit their ladders. I'm not sure if it's the safest solution for a pitched roof though. If you did decide to do this, I'd really consider having a temporary stop beneath the bottom foot of the ladder and possibly on the wall you're leaning it against as well. Another solution would be an ...


4

If you're trying to cut in place, I'd personally go with drilling an initial hole, and then cutting the shape of the vent with a "sheet metal nibbler". The nibbler will let you cut from one side, as there's a small bit that you insert into the hole, and sheers off a small roll of material (somewhere near 1/8", depending on the exact pair). You can also ...


4

Four to six inches is what my home inspector told me. Besides the risk of water intrusion, any area where dirt extends above the sill plate is a huge invitation to wood destroying insects like termites or carpenter ants.


4

I don't think your friend's suggestion is bad, but I'd still want to be sure the caulk extended all the way to the exposed surface of the siding. Better not to let water get into the crack at all than to let it get in and stuck between siding and trim but blocked from penetrating further by caulk. Why? Because in winter, water that's in the crack will ...


3

It's mostly aesthetics, so opinions may vary. I don't what your budget is, but I see many ways it could be improved: The white siding part could be changed to match the beige siding to the right, or if the foundation allows it, replace the white siding with the same brick as the rest. The white door could be painted (or changed altogether) to match the ...


3

I would suggest using composite or PVC lumber in this application. Composite boards are moisture and rot proof. They are made with wood fibers and recycled plastics. Most are paintable so you can match colors. The other choice is PVC boards. Some are paintable, but most should be used in the factory color. If you do paint PVC, use a product that is ...


3

If it's real cedar, it shouldn't be more complicated than scraping, sanding, and restaining. You'll have to sand down to bare wood before restaining. Depending on what kind of siding you have, it might be hard to sand it everywhere, in which case painting it might be a better option. For paint, you just have to make sure you scrape/sand to the point where ...


3

Have you thought about using hardy board siding? You can get the same look and feel of wood without the risk of mold or termites. The price would not be much different than a good quality wood siding. It is not that difficult to install either, so labor cost should be no different. It is also easy to remove and replace incase there are any future ...


3

You'll absolutely need to cut back the siding and attach directly to the home. For the siding, you need two custom tools. The first is a small hook for unhooking a piece of siding from the piece below. Use this to remove all the pieces that are currently where you want to install the plate. Get a role of tyvek tape to cover up all the holes left from ...


3

I lived in a house growing up that had some diagonal board & batten siding that had gone to a shade of grey like an untreated cedar fence, and I know it wasn't painted, but it's possible it was stained. But I'd agree with DA01 -- there's lots of types of 'green building', and I'd rather go with long-lasting and locally produced (to minimize shipping) ...


3

"Siding Corner Caps" Or often just tin caps. They should be available. Or you could have some fabricated, or perhaps adapt some intended for other siding materials. Install by running a thin bead of caulk along the end of each clapboard, slide the top under the upper course and press into the caulk. Nail underneath at each corner with a small corrosion ...


3

You absolutely want to use a brush for most exterior surfaces, and definitely the siding and trim. The only time to ever use a roller is on a large flat surface (think drywall, or plywood paneling) -- in the image you provided I might use a roller for the white soffit, but that's it and only if it's a large house. Aside from avoiding unsightly "orange ...


3

You could paint it white without covering the walls, and solve both the dark and potential permitting issues with the other approach. Paint is generally free of permitting needs (so long as you source it locally so it's VOC legal for California/LA air pollution issues, I suppose from afar.) Permit/code issues would better be addressed by a local - as an ...


2

If you can remove one panel carefully you might find the manufacturer stamp on the back. It will narrow down the search down a little bit. Otherwise just a small sample would be nice to have when visit the stores. I've seen websites on the web that identify manufactures based on the sample that you send. Both Lowe's and Home Depot sell some vynil siding. Not ...


2

T-111 is pretty much the standard for that kind of stuff. What kind of a look are you going for? You could always sheath it with OSB and put anything you want on top of that (vinyl, clapboard, etc.)


2

I once rented a home that had a serious woodpecker problem. Fake owls were useless. Repairing the holes with spray foam insulation and painting it resulting in the foam being torn out within a week. Covering the holes with metal resulted in really loud hammering and dented metal (apparently the males like the extra noise to show off to females). IIRC our ...


2

I've heard wind chimes work... never heard of the fake owl. Interesting technique.


2

Stain? Though I'd suggest you instead seal and maintain the wood so you lasts a long time rather than burn it.


2

Over a period of 22 years (when we initially bought this townhouse) we tried everything (owls, aluminum twirling devices, a concoction of chili peppers (blended to make a paste) and applied to the siding (this was recommended by U.S. Fish and Game specialist). Nothing worked. Then we were advised by our local pest control service to hang a netting, ...


2

I don't know. But I'm not aware of any reason not to put treated wood inside a home, and treated wood inside against masonry has been recommended numerous times by others on this site and elsewhere. 2-4. Electrical boxes, piping, and panelling must all be mounted to a stronger surface than poly insulation, as you suspected. You would need to mount to the ...



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