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If I understand your question correctly, you are running a pipe from the in-wall mixing valve into the attic space to supply a rain shower head. This means that the water in this pipe will never be under pressure. Make the pipe accessible and protected, insulate around it. This should be more than sufficient.


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Not sure if this is the right answer, but this is what I did: removed a piece of drywall from the ceiling and cleaned all the insulation that fell down built a small plywood box in the attic above the ceiling (only covering the top and sides, with access from below); insulated the seams with silicone ran the pipe through the plywood box re-drywalled the ...


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where is the home? he most important question: Does it freeze in your attic? Even if it freezes - if the pipe is beneath ample insulation it is ok - Unless you are on an extended vacation - in which case must leave the heat on low enough to make sure the house envelope does not drop below freezing.


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Hmm. I'm going to guess this is possibly water-hammer related, where a high-pressure spike caused by the toilet fill valve shutting is forcing water past the mixing valve. If so, the water would be released as the toilet stops filling, and a water hammer arrestor should settle it down, be it new and high-tech with a piston or old (merely an air-filled pipe ...


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DensShield is a Class II vapor retarder (at least, after tiling), which should meet your code requirement (YMMV). I would recommend tearing out the plastic membrane vapor barrier, using only the DensShield. As things are, I think you're probably okay, though. The DensShield will still allow some (though limited) drying for any moisture that makes it in ...


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For a pure shower (not bathtub), I always put a membrane on over the backerboard. Redgard is my preferred choice right now so I would be fine with that choice. I really don't think there is anything that you need to do. If I am putting plastic behind my backer I should see it sticking out under the backer and over the base in the picture - it would be ...


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in my experience, let it dry first - just as you would let joint comound dry...dry to the touch and firm. I've pushed the envelope on a couple of occassions and what enbds up happening is the thinset shrinks as it dries, sucking the tile in, and causing a hairline crack.


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Well either the diverter isn't closing off the hot and cold to the mixing valve or there is an issue with the mixing valve itself. You wouldn't be able to physically see anything wrong with either until you start taking them apart. If you noticed your handle moving "faster" that can signal that the handle was not tightened properly or has stripped ...


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Any trap that has been installed, can also be removed and replaced, albeit at some effort and expense. Have your plumbers replace any piping that needs it, and send the bill to your shoddy tiling contractor. If he/she balks, you may have to resort to legal action. Take good photos of the mess, and get sworn statements from the plumbers. Dumping acid and ...


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http://www.pfisterfaucets.com/Bath/Product/R90-TD2K.aspx Found this puppy at Home Depot. It's a universal kit, like the Danco, but it's actually high quality. Did the job and looks great. Cost me $99. Also, I was saying my valve was a "Moentrol" based on the Danco trim instructions. Turns out, it was actually not a moentrol. It's a "moen standard" which ...


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Moentrol is the type of valve, the single knob that pulls out and pushes in for flow control and rotates right and left for temperature control. There were numerous trim styles offered with that valve type, so just saying "Moentrol" does not adequately describe your needs. Some of the old trim plates were marked with the word Moentrol, but many were not. If ...


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Normally you would get something like the picture below to cover the side of the tile. But it generally has to be installed under tile. (you could still try it out and mud/caulk on the flat end but I don't see it lasting long looking good in a damp area) Now you will have to go with some kind of bullnose or trim piece, much like you would trim out a ...


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I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...


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It seems to me that you have cartridge problem. Replace it and you would be fine. There is nothing wrong with your pressure or your plumbing. And Oh, Pex is fine.


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This will not solve your issue, but I would strongly suggest to stop using that shower if you can, and open the drywall where you see the leak. For two reasons: It'll help you see where the water is coming from. It will help dry out the wall and help prevent or slow down molding. That part of the drywall is no longer needed anyways because you'll have ...


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If you're seeing that water on the drywall on the other side of the wall opposite where the tile is then your shower was not installed with a proper membrane. You need a waterproof memberane and a suitable substrate for the shower. This would be something like kerdi and/or a tile backerboard painted with redgard. You cannot use drywall to back it, nor can ...


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The next step is to snake the drain with a plumbing snake: Or to call a plumber.



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