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Try putting the silicone on whilst you are in the shower tray. Your weight will bring the tray down to the level it will be when in use. Loads of people seem to want such long showers these days (I don't understand it I just soap myself clean and go) and this puts such extreme severe strain on buildings. Also make sure the room is well ventilated.


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Essentially, if you had some basic workshop tools you could, you could very easily curve the shower curtain yourself, but the problem is making the curve look professional. Upon bending the tubing (note i say tubing, since I am relatively certain it will be tube) you will most probably create kinks all over at the pressure point of the bend. Your rod is ...


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If you want to re-try grouting, try with a latex additive in it. Sometimes you need to add it yourself when mixing the mortar. The latex is supposed to add flex to the mortar so changes in space, like between wall, cement board, window etc. due to slight movements from temperature or moisture changes will not cause it to crack. Please note, I only say ...


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I had this problem the other day. What you could do to keep it looking nice is fill the cracks in with more grout so that it looks perfect and then put clear caulk over top or dig out all that grout and caulk it with white caulk. There is special caulk that is mildew resistant made specifically for the bathroom.


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That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


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Okay, probably way too late now... And maybe too complex, but... Run the hot water supply through some copper pipe and snake it back and forth behind the mirror which is thermally connected to the pipe, with something. I haven't worked that out yet.


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In the absence of a puller (which you can usually borrow from a local hardware store if you buy a cartridge) you can use the handle screw to attach any flat iron bar stock (even a piece of wood maybe) to the stem and twist and pull the cartridge out. I've done it many times.


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The manual for the Moen 1224 cartridge seems to suggest that it just pulls out. Instead of WD-40 try something like CLR. I'd expect you have something like lime or hard water making it stick more than rust. WD-40 won't do much on lime or hard water type corrosion and its not great on rust either. Are you sure you have a Moen Chateau? It seems that the ...


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You cannot use redgard or aqua defense as the final coat. (says this in their product info) Over time standing on them, dropping things or whatever would cause weak points or holes. They are meant to have some type of hard surface on top of them for protection - stone, tile, plastic, and so on. Paint would not help at all. Any type of paint that got wet ...


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2 part Epoxy is water proof. Um, what type of shower enclosure? Is it a hand made mortar bed? Normally a shower would have tiles. In this case it would have a rubber basin or like long long ago, some heavy tar paper then the build up. Red and Aqua, not water proof for continuous direct exposure. Ie, I wouldn't make a bath tub out of either. Tile is best ...


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if it is a MOEN Faucet just remove the handle from the stem & turn the stem 180deg. & re-install the handle & all should be back to normal again ... Hope this cures it!


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I was and still am in complete agreement with paperstreet's answer, buy another tub. I've never used this system. These look like a fail waiting to happen. Available from schluter.com, asked about at johnbridge.com calling them field installed flanges.


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I hate to give an answer that's not really an answer but I think you need to return that tub. Without a flange there's no way to guarantee that water won't migrate over and around the edge of the tub into your wall where cavity where it will fester, unseen until you have a major problem. If someone has a better, more can-do, solution I'll be the first in ...


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In a bathroom remodel, the shower valve I installed (with hot and cold inlets, tub outlet, shower outlet) had a small brass cone in the shower outlet, presumably as a restrictor. The lower tub outlet had no restrictor. If you have "full" pressure on your tub I suspect this is the case. If your shower has a large cartridge you might be able to remove it and ...



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