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1

Before using any adhesive to secure a shower curtain rod, I think you'd have more success keeping it in place with an expanding or screw- type rod. It's the same idea as the chin-up bars that mount in a doorway. The rubber stops at each end of the rod prevent mars and wall damage. I've seen them turned so tight the tile cracked! But if you still need some ...


0

I would like to add that cleaning the surface with denatured alcohol prior to applying the sealant is absolutely critical. Otherwise you will begin experiencing separation with in a few months.


1

Since I can see holes in the pan that look like they were used for installation purposes - nail holes. - An absolute certainty of failure - Tear the whole shower out. Save yourself money in the long run. I have replaced showers that are only 4 or 5 years old with small penetrations in the pan which caused major water damage to structural members. If those ...


-2

In my upstairs bathroom that has a full 6 ft. whirlpool tub and shower I used cement board throughout the tub area for the long term durability before tiling. It has held up excellently. For the basement powder room, I am just putting in a stand up shower. This will not get as much use so I used green board on all of the interior walls of the bathroom and ...


1

You will need a P-Trap. If you look at the inside of a toilet, it won't have a P-Trap inside, but it is built in such a way that gas cannot vent into the air. It sounds to me like your issue is because of a small shower drain-line connected to your shower. To fix this, you should use a larger size pipe for your P-trap that won't get clogged. Please ...


3

You need the trap, for precisely the reason you guessed. Toilets have the trap built into the toilet itself. What you could do is get a strainer made to fit under the plug - often used in kitchen sinks. They are easy to find at most home stores or even dollar stores. That will stop any big stuff from going down the drain, and give you a chance to pull it ...


0

The best answer is to reapply when they need it, but if you're nervous you could pull it up and apply every year or two. In a perfect world, it would last much longer than that. I'd use a putty knife to scrape up that existing silicone so that the new bead gets a nice clean seal. You don't want to just keep adding more silicone on top of what's already ...


0

Assuming you already have a clean shower head, a new shower head isn't going to boost water pressure, technically speaking. Either the pressure is there or it's not. That being said, it may feel like you're getting better pressure due to the design. It's really trial and error with shower heads and a personal preference, but I have found Speakman to help and ...


2

Use masking tape to prevent overspreading, and dip your finger in mineral spirits to smooth it out. Remove the tape before the silicone sets. Never use water to smooth silicone, only latex/acrylic. It's difficult to remove silicone from rough or porous surfaces. No problem to remove with razor blade from glass.


12

National Electrical Code is pretty clear on this, at least as of the 2014 version. It says that if the fixture is above the tub or shower, and within 8 ft. vertically from the top of the bathtub rim or shower threshold, the fixture must be rated for damp locations. If the fixture may be subject to shower spray, it has to be rated for wet locations. If it ...


0

On the shelf at the renovation store of your choice you should find a variety of replacement parts for faucets. Some valves open clockwise- some open counterclockwise . Some early plumbing was the style of the United Kingdom / Britain where water came in Cold and Hot - and some plumbing is simply Hot and Cold. Thus there was a need to have replacement ...


1

I would always use cement board in the shower area. I would extend the cement board to where you shower unit will cover. You can go past that point just plaster with a nice joint compound, like durabond to join to the rest of the plaster board for a permanent bond. I typically do not use green board unless you expect the wall can get wet, like a basement. ...


2

Confirming from the fine manual it appears you're on the right track-- remove the set screw then pull. You may be able to use a faucet puller tool for slightly more leverage. If there is a buildup of mineral deposit or corrosion you may need to use a chemical to loosen the threads.


0

So are you saying I need to fix the cartridge or the valve and does it need to be replaced or just adjusted? Is this something pretty simple that I can do myself? Appreciate it!


1

No other fixtures are "dependent" on the shower valve. What may be happening is what is called "crossover", hot water crossing over into the cold water line (or vise-versa) due to a defective single-handle mixing control. It sounds like your plumber may have been right, as this would tend to not have a noticeable effect when the shower is flowing. When the ...


1

Changing the pitch would do little. It sounds like it may not be vented correctly.


0

Because the showerhead isn't installed properly (or it is damaged/cracked). First try tightening it. They just screw on. Make sure the threaded piece of the showerhead isn't cracked - some cheap plastic ones break quite easily, and if that is the problem you need to replace the showerhead. Take it off and make sure there is a rubber washer inside and ...



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