New answers tagged

1

Your question-asking and diagram are great! Unfortunately, i can't fully conceptualize it right now (too hungry), but I hope this post gives you helpful info re: wall height. Here's a pic of my parents' shower stall, which we designed together: I hate curtains and convinced them an "open concept" shower would be cool. They planned for a full-height glass ...


2

I have seen this with washer less faucets. The pressure drop causes them to drip especially if they are older. A set of new seals and possibly springs may tighten it enough to stop the drip, The big box stores Cary kits with different sizes some times they are color coded to size, there are at least 3 different sizes that I can remember, or you could pull ...


5

I suspect you're seeing the result of poorly-translated product descriptions from China and elsewhere. For example: Advantages: Withdrawing life greatly improved. Should not damage the leaking. The inner tube using the nylon braided package EPDM more resistant wound. Honory99 1.5m Pull-type Copper Core Explosion-proof Shower Hose This product would ...


3

safe to use the shower is a relative question. when will it be safe to use it so that its use doesn't compromise the caulking seal? never - it was already compromised the moment you did it that way. caulking shrinks as it dries, and the speed at which it dries changes how it polymerizes. when you make a huge blob of caulking, you seal in much of the ...


2

Answer: there's no way to tell. Caulk isn't meant to fill large gaps (more than 1/2" is one spec I saw, and even that seems wide to me). Even if you waited long enough for the caulk to dry, it's quite possible that the caulk will fail due to the stress of stretching across that gap. The best (and perhaps even quickest) solution would be to clean off all the ...


0

in homes with lots of women, or men with long hair, this is a constant battle. the only way to prevent this is to put a hair catcher over your drain, but these are a nusiance. primarily the problem comes from hairs getting stuck at some bend or sticky area in a pipe, and this acts as a scaffold for more hairs to accrete and so on and so on. if you ...


1

Short answer: He/She may be correct but ask them what problems they forsee running into that made them decide that. Long answer: This should be possible but I'm not sure it will be visually appealing and you might have problems finding a premade pan that fits your space. You may also need to redo the drain plumbing since fiberglass pans have standard ...


1

It's actually a Danze. I had to replace mine as my hot water would not shut off. After alot of investigating and calling different suppliers ex: Moen and Delta, I was directed to Danze 1-800-487-8372. I sent them a picture of the cartridge and it was theirs.


3

My mom used to bring well water back from the lakehouse for rinsing her hair; installed a shelf for those blue 5 gallon water jugs, which weigh ~40 pounds. It seems you have a 2.5 gallon bucket, with a handle that will put the weight out at least a few inches (more like half a foot, plus). I would not do this. Perhaps a hook in the ceiling or on the wall? ...


3

It is hard to say without opening the wall you may have a metal pipe coming out of the wall and PVC or CPVC, copper or Galvanized pipe. With galvanized pipe it might be strong enough if the pipe is strapped to a stud but you would be taking a chance.


0

Just sharing my personal experience with a bubbly toilet when running the sink. (It was only the sink, as the shower uses a different drainage system.) Long story short: The cause was a drainage pipe that the "seasoned" plumbers installed at an upward angle. I placed an old chunk of wood under it to level it out, and, voila! - no more bubbles singing smelly ...


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You need a fixture listed for wet locations: from the NEC. Bathtub and shower areas. Luminaries located within the actual outside dimension of the bathtub or shower to a height of 8' vertically from the top of the bathtub or threshold of the shower shall be marked for damp locations or for wet locations were subject to shower spray. NEC 410.10.D. Since in a ...


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From the 2014 NEC: 210.8 (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. (1) Bathrooms There is no requirement in the code for bathroom lights or exhaust fans to be GFCI protected. ...



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