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Yes just add more grout in. Not a huge deal but really looks like a rush job. Look in basement or storage to see if they left any grout bags. If they didn't don't just use whatever grout. Mix a small batch and let it dry and make sure it is the same color. If you chip off a piece of grout that is by one of your gaps you can bring a sample to the ...


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Yes, in all likelihood this can be repaired fairly easily. It is a good possibility that these holes are due to poor quality work where the original grout was not fully squeezed down into the joints. You may find other areas that are not yet broken open but also just a partial penetration into the joint. You will have to work carefully to replace with like ...


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Try unscrewing the tub faucet itself. I am replacing old brass trim also and couldn't figure out how to remove the faucet from the roman tub. It has no set screw. I had a plumber take a look and he finally twisted the entire faucet counter clockwise and it unscrewed. My problem now is that underneath the faucet is a 3/4" pipe (valve?) that the new trim needs ...


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I would guess that if you trace the piping backwards from the shower to the water source you’re going to find a multitude of fittings or one section where the pipe diameter is reduced too much.


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Looks like this is already solved, but here's another possible approach. These fittings often consist of a drop ear brass elbow like this: The part you see sticking out out of the wall is simply a brass nipple threaded into the elbow: You could get yourself an internal pipe wrench, unthread the nipple, and replace it with one half an inch (12 mm) ...


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Check the yellow pages for custom glass shops. They can make or custom order the tempered glass and may have common sizes in stock. I replaced a large door a few years ago for on the order of $100 IIRC. Many will do free estimates, and know the market well enough to tell you if you're wasting your time. It may also be worth looking at some older, ...


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Even if you found the manufacturer of the door, they would not sell a part to a retail customer. Such things are made in batches and change every season, so the door model you have is probably long gone. In fact, the company is probably long gone. To make the door custom would probably cost way more than $300.


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It is really hard to tell from the picture. Is the pipe from the wall threaded all the way down to below the tile surface? If the answer is no then I would be concerned that if you were to saw off 10mm of the threaded pipe coming out of the wall that you may have one or two problems. You could be left with so few threads that it will be hard to seal the ...


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Not an expert, but I suspect using a hacksaw is going to be the safest way without potentially damaging the tiles. May take some elbow grease though!


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I was able to fix the low water pressure issue by slightly opening the valve stops. I was able to fix the vibration issue by finding a procedure online to empty my water lines.


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Slightly off topic, but if you are looking for a good product to disinfect your shower and clean mould, I would seriously consider Hydrogen Peroxide. The H202 structure of Hydrogen Peroxide means that its just an unstable form of water with one extra oxygen molecule. When, oxidisation occurs, one extra oxygen is released, so, all you smell will be oxygen. ...


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Google for "Bathtub drain key", it's a tool that expands to fit and grip the drain very strongly, so it can be unscrewed from the top.


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Is it a tub/shower combo? If it's totally gutted, what about adding a tub spout with a diverter valve? The vertical column of water to your shower will drain after every use. As long as all the pipes in the attic are pitched, you should be fine.


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A slow-draining shower is often caused by hair caught on the crossbar where the screw that holds the strainer attaches. Unscrew the screw in the middle of the strainer and lift out the strainer and the screw. If there's a bunch of hair there, pull it out. (Ewww...).


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As discussed in the comments above, I removed all crud & corrosion, so by process of elimination I am hopefully getting closer to an answer which is contained in this very elaborate detailed response; check it out


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I've never seen an electric shower (looks to be a European thing?) but based on the diagram in that article you've got electrical contacts near moisture. Corrosion is quite likely and would cause intermittent problems like you describe. Turn off all power to the device then open it and check for "crud" on any of the electrical terminals. a fine brass-bristle ...


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I have used a strap-wrench to undo that type of connector. In your case there is very limited access but it would be worth an attempt. It can be difficult if some people have previously applied a sealant - which are not normally needed as there is usually a rubber gasket.


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The good news is that you can tell these are both Harden kits. I have seen Harden on some older homes but don't know if they still make stuff or not - I certainly have never seen Harden stuff being sold at a plumbing store. The easiest thing to do is remove all of the trim - anything that is brass. Take this trim to a local plumbing supply store (with ...


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Yes: Everything in your pictures falls into the realm of trim. If you remove the knobs, handles, and spouts, you will find valve and spout stubs. You should be able to remove all trim without shutting off the water. Plumbing supply houses should be able to find compatible trim pieces.


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If you get warm water out of the spout and cold water out of the shower head, then I sounds like you've isolated the potential problem to the diverter (only other thing that comes to mind is some kind of water pressure based issue, but I can't think of where that would happen on the hot water side only since you have separate hot/cold knobs). Since this is ...


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If I am interpreting the pictures correctly, I think the white plastic piece that sits inside is the limiter. Carefully remove the U-shaped locking piece, taking care not to damage the piece slide the white piece out some and turn it counter clockwise slightly and re-set it. Lock it back in place, and test the water max temperature again.


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Glad you found your answer. I've also had slow leaks (drips) like you experienced due to (1) solder spatter inside the valve that prevented a good seal on the rubber, and (2) plumber soldering the pipe with the cartridge in place which hardened the rubber so it didn't seal well.


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Figured it out. The black plastic piece was a removable cartridge, I rocked it side to side and it began to give a bit--after that I lightly threaded oversized bolts into the normal bolt holes and was able to use them to rock and pull it out. I found that it was a three-piece cartridge; the outer portion contains the water inlets and a rubber gasket on the ...


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First I want to mention that your tile guy is 100% responsible for this. He should be fixing this alone and paying for any plumbing issues. This could end up being something that could cost you a few thousand dollars or more if you are in a city. There is a chance that not only do you have grout (cement) blocking one section but it could be layering your ...



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