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17

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


16

I'd try a few of these keyhole mounting plates: You'd need to be very precise with screw placement so everything lines up properly. If you're feeling adventurous, you could chisel or route out a recess so the whole thing is flush against the wall. You could also mount the plates to the wall at a stud, using sufficiently long screws, and then use smaller ...


13

You might consider mounts like z-clips These are listed as 1 7/8 inches high overall, but you might be able to trim the height (a little off the top piece, a little off the bottom) to just a bit less than the thickness of a 2x4, recess them into the back of the piece, leaving a small lip of wood at the top to conceal the mount (the bottom would have to be ...


11

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


8

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


8

Enter The Sagulator - it's a free online calculator for sag of shelves which is a wonderful tool exactly for these questions. Running your 2 shelf sizes, the larger shelf span (122 CM) won't hold more than about 2 KG overall without noticeably sagging. The shorter shelf (61 CM) can hold about 10 KG overall. As you can see, 10 MM plywood isn't that stiff ...


7

You could create a mounting strip using a dovetail router bit. Route out a dovetail slot along the backside of the long 2x4's. Top and bottom if you want, or just the top. (Bottom half of picture.) Create the mounting strip. (Top half of picture.) Pre-drill holes in the mounting strip to line up with the studs in your wall. Mount the strip on the wall. ...


7

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can be drilled, routed or ...


7

Gently hammer up on the bottom, right next to the rail. They jam in place, especially if heavily loaded, and sometimes need persuasion to come loose again. Several light taps will be less likely to go wrong than pounding as hard as you can. Some (not all) will also respond to lifting up on the outermost end. Don't overdo that, or you'll bend them, ...


6

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small ...


6

I find all the above answers to be quite good, but each is too busy for my tastes ... too many pieces, specialty hardware etc ... My solution would be to ... locate the studs drive 2.5" nails into the studs such that they angle upwards have 1" exposed I'd use either of these 8d or 10d nails: box nails, and a pair of vise-grips or slip-joints to cut ...


5

Metro does not seem to sell an appropriate foot leveler. But a common carriage bolt will fit just fine. The rounded head compensates for the slope far better than the flat factory foot, and you can file the raised numbers off easily: Or find a 3/8" 16 pitch "Combination Leg Equalizer" such as the Rockler #24315, which will spread the load more evenly: ...


4

I know you didn't ask for screws, but they do tend to be the most practical solution. A few screw options: Screw into the top of the back just under the shelf, then tack up a bit of molding there to cover the screws. Make the screws a decorative element. I've used 'countersink washers' for this before: For future use, attach the back to the wall first ...


4

Pivot hinges would be an economical solution for good weight bearing. You have to provide a solid top pivot point. This Stanley has 150 lbs capacity. There are many others of this type, ranging up to 1000 lbs. Used by all secret bookcase doors.


4

Ply is good in shear, helping the door from racking. I would use euro style hinges, meant for frameless cabinets. They will transfer the door weight better than simple butt hinges. They also have 3 way adjustments for compensating for sagging over time. Just be sure to start out with a good gap and room for the hinge to adjust up.


4

Depends on overall design and load, and, in terms of screw/nails, it depends on what will be anchored to what. A floor plan annotated with fastener locations would help. If you are notching in order to transfer load to the 4x4, a 1/2" deep notch is all that is necessary. Notching will take shear stresses off the associated screws/nails/bolts. EDIT: Great ...


4

You COULD do that, [the adjusters-things you want are called turnbuckles] but it might be a lot simpler (no holes in the ceiling) to use better and larger shelf brackets. Better, in having a brace that makes them a triangle. Larger, making a larger, more stable triangle. A pair of good heavy duty brackets in a large size will make a shelf that you can sit on ...


3

Put the leg that best matches your shelf width under the shelf. That is why there's different leg sizes. The bracket's critical section is the inner corner, it is equally strong in both directions. That said, usually the critical portion of the entire assembly is the withdrawal of the upper wall screw. Having the long leg against the wall somewhat reduces ...


3

Typically you would remove them, however the anchor you are using is marketed as a "stud solver" meaning that it can be driven into a stud. I think it is fine to leave them. If you were using small plastic drywall anchors then I'd definitely remove them and drive a screw directly into the stud.


3

There is an anchor that has similar characteristics to a toggle bolt, known as a toggle anchor These have a long straps holding the metal backing toggle. The straps are slid out of line to turn the toggle parrallel for insertion in the hole. Then the straps are aligned to turn the toggle perpendicular. The outer collar is slide along the tracks to the ...


3

Depending how you make your joints, if you choose to use screws, they need to go into the joining piece at least 3/4"-1" deep, and deeper when going into the end of a piece, 1 1/2" is a good depth, For this you can use a 2" screw, countersunk a little. The drawing below, may have a little more info than what you are looking for, but it will give you options ...


3

The metric (4 or 5mm) holes can be redrilled to hold the 1/4" shelf spoons. If that does not do it, there are metal sockets for the 1/4" spoons that take a slightly larger hole, then they can be driven into place to hold the larger spoon. If the spoons or clips already have a 1/4" hole, then you may be better off retro fitting a shelf track system. Third ...


3

A 2 piece shelf is a good plan, but my scheme differs from yours from there. Yours would work, but mine's better (IMO). Instead of plywood, I would use MDF. It's dimensionally stable, easy to work, and paints up very nicely with a very smooth surface. I would cut a circular hole to fit the duct closely so small things don't fall into the void below. ...


2

I think plywood would make a good backing for the doors. I would use something with better quality though and not 1/8 " thin junk or "masonite" type products. My take would be to use two layers of 1/4 inch material. One layer can be screwed through the face into the shelves to make a very sturdy structure. The other can then be glued to the first with the ...


2

Safe loads are determined through engineering and experimentation. The experimentation is used to gather real-world data, which then is used as input to engineering processes, which then result in guidelines and building codes. This is all updated over time as new materials are introduced and new experience is gained. When there's a situation that is ...


2

I built some garage shelving like the second drawing (without notches) some time back. I used 2x4 instead of 4x4. I screwed 2x4 rails to it. Honestly, it was very strong shelving. I put some very heavy loads on it in excess of 250kg. I do think notching it would make it effectively like a 2x2 in the notched sections and reduce it's strength in the ...


2

You could try these heavy-duty mounting squares They're rated for up to 1 lb. According to the specs, your switch weighs 0.6 lbs. It will fall every time someone trips over a cord, but that is preferable to the whole shelf coming down like with a screw or zip-tie.


2

The best rugged shelving that I've used in the basement and garage is called "rivet lock" shelving. This type is quite sturdy, has adjustable shelves and can be easily disassembled and moved. When you go to search out this type make sure to get genuine rivet lock shelving. There are cheaper shelves that try to imitate the rivet lock type but are flimsy and ...


2

I found a matching image at http://www.furnitureinfashion.net/beech-home-wall-shelves-lasse-p-6628.html?osCsid=cf4c725a6d1c4b00d50adca495f827d3 which has dimensions of W85cm x D16cm x H47.5cm. As to building it, I've built several like it over the years, and believe it really is up to you. What I mean is you can take this basic design and modify the ...


2

The room you're in has some nice crown moulding and probably is a nicely finished room - it's a shame (IMHO) to put in some crappy looking shelf brackets. Just to throw out an alternative suggestion, why not use a product meant for exactly this purpose? There are wall and ceiling mounts for projectors, and look around online and you'll find these starting ...



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