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9

The type of shelf pins shown in your photo are able to twist out of crappy MDF or particle board side walls when a lot of torque is placed on the pin due to excessive weight placed upon the shelf. There are alternate types of shelf bracket pins that are designed to keep the pin at 90 degrees to the side wall thus keeping it from torquing out of the hole. ...


9

Cleats. Well, If I didn't simply add up what this expletive redacted liquor cabinet just cost me (not counting husky-containment and mopping time) and shoot it into the sun to be wholly replaced with a decently made hunk of furniture, which I'd be fairly inclined to do after what you just went through. I would glue and screw 1x2 wooden cleats (non-...


8

I find it hard to believe that a few bottles would tear those pins out, unless either 1) the shelves are too short, resulting in a lot of torsional force, or 2) the pins weren't fully seated. Four pins, even in MDF, should support 100 lbs. easily. Custom and pre-built cabinets around the world use simple dowels for shelf support, even in particle board, and ...


5

A boom hitch (ABoK #1687), might look nice around the log. A simple bowline (ABoK #1010), or other secure loop would be fine for the hooks. A simple loop with a decorative weave on the standing end, might also look nice. That way the decorative bit would be above/below the loop.


4

It means sapwood (lighter colored) is permitted in the grading of the board,so it's not guaranteed to be a full-face of "black" walnut (which is the most common walnut to run into that terminology for.) If the's been steamed, the color may not be all that noticeable, since that migrates color into the sapwood from the heartwood - for air dried there is a ...


3

The concern is mostly pullout strength, and not shear. The bulk of the leverage of the shelf pulling away from the wall is above the shelf. Therefore, screws above the shelf carry most of the pullout load. It's unlikely that you will have insufficient shear strength if you use 3-4 screws per standard. My point is that you probably won't need the standards ...


3

Your problem is there's nothing holding the 4 posts in place. The fix is to attach the shelves to the posts as tightly as possible - they can't just set on the posts. What you've basically done is tried to create a large version of these common steel shelves: If you've ever put one together, the strength and stability comes from the wedge anchors on ...


3

No. Drywall isn't meant to have exposed, unsupported edges. If you hang stuff over the edge, it'll probably fail - at the very least, you'll have drywall dust all over your closet. Get some screws, and attach the organizer to the wall studs. (Since the top of the drywall is missing, you'll have no trouble finding the studs.) Take 5 extra minutes, and do the ...


2

I took a quick look at the assembly instructions. If you wanted the shelves permanently attached the time to do this was while assembling the cabinet. Instead of using the shelf pins you would use wooden dowels as you did with the non-adjustable shelves. One issue is that the adjustable shelves are going to be slightly shorter than the permanent shelves ...


2

Brackets of the type you want are made. Specifically designed for supporting wall mounted cupboards, white boards, panels etc. These were spotted in a UK web site for SPUR Shelving. You would have to check if the slot height and spacing on SPUR products matches those of the particular twin slot standards that you are considering.


2

Those shelves require a solid base. So you'd have to build a solid base (plywood could work) and attach casters to those. Then attach the shelf to that. However, you still have the issue of moving said shelves. Those shelves are designed primarily for vertical loads and tend to not handle lateral loads well at all...which would be the case when you push or ...


2

There is no "one-step" way to install casters on these types of shelves. You would have to build a base, or affix them to something like a mobile power tool base. In general this would be a lot of work for a potentially dangerous rolling shelf. You would be better off finding a wire-type shelving unit, which are often built either with casters, or slots for ...


2

You don't want to install wheels on those shelves. They will fall apart on you. Instead of trying to find a way to install wheels on shelves, find shelving that is already on wheels and buy that.


2

You should re-consider several of your ideas. The stripping on the wall is an excellent way to support shelves. However do use something like a 1x3 or 1x4 so that the material has some substance and strength. A 1x1 is just too flimsy, can bow between studs and after accepting one screw through it there is not much meat left to the piece. A wider strip ...


2

This can be done with hardwood strips, but it's definitely better to go with steel. But No, the strips should not be on the top or bottom, those won't do anything...the shelf is already the universal beam's flanges, you need to add the universal beam's vertical support. The single piece full length strips of steel should only be applied (glued & ...


2

Tried to make this a comment but must have been to long. So here goes. I think a router would be what you are looking for. There are bits that will cut a 45 and a curved edge. Both will help with the sharp edge. Some bits control the depth with a shaft (cheaper ones) some control with a small bearing. The trick is to figure out the direction of cut to make ...


2

Use the silicone, contrary to some ideas expressed it does stick well to clean smooth surfaces. So well, in fact, that mechanical scraping is often the only way to remove it once cured (actually there are some chemicals, like dimethyl adipate, that soften cured silicone). If the brackets are securely mounted to the wall, silicone will grip like hell and ...


2

As @ JPhi1618 has stated try adding a second clamp on the top of the shelves. Before trying that I would try bolting the shelves to the smaller hinge pin hole. For visual appearance sake I would try either a carriage bolt or a flat head screw that is counter sunk.


2

Use the thinnest putty knife you can obtain to release the double stick tape. To get the remaining adhesive off, I would first use a dry rag and try to rub it off. Always rub in the same direction. If that doesn't do it, I would then use "Goof Off", alcohol or acetone to remove the adhesive left behind - first testing a hidden area with the product to make ...


2

I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


1

I would have no concern building this with the right fasteners. There are plenty of really nice, self-tapping, nearly indestructible construction screws to be had (random example). The key joints are at the back of the shelf, where the vast majority of the torsional stress occurs. Use whatever decorative fasteners you like at the front. Put two 4" ...


1

My take is that the sheer thickness of the shelves that you propose will look heavy and chunky to the point of being unattractive. I would also have concerns about the overall sturdiness of a shelf that is cantilevered off a single 2x4 screwed to the wall. If it were me I would go for a thinner style of assembly and use vertical end sides on the shelves.


1

Soapstone is easily worked. I'd drill holes (not all the way through) and tap them with an ordinary tap, (or even a modified screw - soapstone is really easily worked) and use machine screws or stove bolts to fasten the shelf to the brackets. To make a crude tap from a screw, grind the threads off the end and grind slots. Look at a regular tap for guidance. ...


1

I don't have enough reputation here to insert a comment, but I just want to say that the radiator will not work properly then. With radiators the heat spread mainly using convective transfer: the heat go up and you are blocking it with the stone.


1

Yes, it will smooth an already straight edge. Meaning, it'll just further smooth what's rough feeling & you'll still need to sand & fill for plywood. But No, it won't fix, square or straighten an edge. You would have needed to make the cut in 2 or 3 passes (Router's aren't good for cutting over a 1/2" deep per pass) with a Router butting up to a ...


1

Probably. 4 brackets rated at 20kg should, in theory, carry 80kg, loaded uniformly. This depends entirely on the integrity of the fasteners and the wall, of course. The original rating of the shelf as a floating assembly isn't particularly relevant. I'd set it up, then do a test with progressively heavier dead (non-fishy) weight. It should be apparent if it'...


1

Tear-out of the bolts isn't the primary concern here, even with standard flat washers. Sag is one, and complete snap-off of the sheet corners is another. If you must use the sheet without a frame, I'd move the cables inboard substantially--cantilever the shelf about 20% of it's length and width. This gives assurance that the corners won't break off and ...


1

Yes it would be stronger because you could attach more screws. also if resting on the floor gravity wouldnt pull the bracket downward.


1

You really don't want to penetrate that wall at all nor especially hang anything off of it. It's really just meant to work vertically, not laterally. The best & only right shelving method is to hang the shelving from the ceiling joists, then you can have as many as you want. 2x4's resting against the wall with a lot of weight is perfectly fine.


1

IMHO a combination of both ideas would be best; a perimeter strip for edge support and a couple brackets midway for center support, kind of like this: Even if you plan to just store lightweight linens, flat spaces often turn into places to store other items in the future, so a robust support design would be better. I agree with other posters that a hollow ...



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