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3

Unfortunately the MDF board is too thin for true "invisible shelves" I really hate those fittings, they just seem so un-secure! You cannot raise the connector, since the board is too thing. but what you could do, is run a beading across the bottom edge. Thats about all I could think of. that would also help with the secure-ness of the fitting since the ...


3

Unscrew the rollers on both sides. Lower the door so it's parallel to the back. Push one end back into the cabinet until the pin is free of the side slot - or start with the door at the back, and pull one end forward until it's free of the side slot (and then keep pulling forward to remove from the case.) Replacement should be the reverse of removal.


3

I'd look at a running some braces from underneath the front of the bench back to the wall at a 45 degree angle or so. That will hold a lot of weight.


2

Plastic plug in a hole, I've always found drilling into it with a bit slightly smaller and stopping the drill, then pulling it straight out works dandy. If not, it gives to a place to try using a screw (and a nailpuller on the screw if it's REALLY stubborn) more easily. Then look for metal replacement brackets in the correct size for your bookshelf so it ...


2

Assuming you mean a standard #8 wood screw, and a standard office, not much. A 2 inch drywall screw will hold even less. The first half inch of most screws are tapered and thus don't add much to it's strength. Then you need to subtract the thickness of the bracket and the drywall. So now we have a whole one inch actually used for support. Enough to keep ...


2

I'm not really sure what you're describing, but have you considered the originals may be metric (9mm, maybe). Furthermore, if you're thinking of using dowels, you should be able to either: 1) Get the next size up and sand down by hand with rough sand pape until you're able to jam it in, or 2) Drill a slightly larger hole in a size you can match, or 3) ...


2

I did this once when I lived in an apartment and could not modify anything. Since I had metal working and welding experience, I created a steel frame using 1 inch angle steel. Basically, it was a 'table' that stood inside the closet and it's dimensions where precisely the inside dimensions of the closet; ie; the legs were flush against the walls of the ...


2

If you can avoid floating, I suggest you do. It's inherently weak. (And sooner or later, someone's probably going to try chinups or an entire Encyclopedia Britannica on your work.) If you gotta, Rockler sells these blind shelf supports: http://www.rockler.com/blind-shelf-supports. Hope you're in the US, or shipping/customs might be tough. (My review on ...


2

It will depend on your book load, and whether your "hard maple" is really sugar maple or not. There is, of course, an easy way to deal with the calculations these days. Do be sure to read all the "notes" below the calculator. Shelf thickness (or "depth" in beam speak) cubed is indeed the correct factor, and why even small changes in thickness make large ...


1

I would use a hydraulic, similar to what is found on a door. One like the one linked below has a small button you push to set it, and then to release you just relieve the pressure from the hydraulic and it will come down.. Amazon - Hardware Door Closer Hydraulic


1

As an alternative, you could consider what I've done. My desk at the office is electric (I found a good source for electric desks at economical prices and we have several of them). But at home, I raised my entire desk up on blocks so it is at standing height, then got a "drafting stool" style of chair--basically an office chair with a longer gas tube and a ...


1

The device you're describing, sounds like a four-bar linkage. Not sure if you'll be able to find one available that suits your needs, or if you'll have to manufacture it yourself, or if it's even the best design for what you're trying to accomplish. But hopefully that will help you find what you're looking for.


1

The bumps face up to provide air flow. This felicitates the complete and continuous drying of tableware which helps prevent the growth of bacteria, especially useful if you like to store your cups upside down. There is a con to that type you have. Unlike others I've seen that are a sort of nylon web, yours is a solid sheet of plastic. If any water gets ...


1

Take a look at this calculator. You are correct in looking for beam deflection but the details matter for accuracy. http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator.htm Using Red Maple as the wood type with your measurements above the calculator estimates a .1" deflection with a 40 pound per foot uniform load.


1

I would consider using a "french cleat". This is a technique where you cut a board into two pieces using a 45 degree angle. I used this to mount some cabinets and they are incredibly strong. It just depends on whether you can adapt that to the shelf you have. Good luck.


1

If you're sagging in the longitudinal direction, support lengthwise. If you can brace or support the entire length of the shelf, you can avoid a lot of the sagging. Sometimes even so much as adding a font lip will go a long way to making the shelves sturdier. Even a 1/2" x 1" strip, fastened with glue and countersunk wood screws will go a long way. If even ...


1

I've wondered this before, too. Honestly I wouldn't trust a horizontal tension rod shelf unless you're putting lightweight, and not breakable, things on it. I know you're renting, but you could install shelves with braces and then just patch the holes when you leave, assuming you can find similar paint. Another alternative is just something like ...


1

Thete are several kinds of supports sold specifically for this purpose, plus the option of using fairly standard triangular brackets upside down and arranging the shelf's contents to hide them.


1

A medium duty, standard single slot, blade bracket? Source: beta.lvmannequins.com Another option might be removing the plastic caps off the uprights and slide something down there; put 'legs' on the board and slip it in. Isn't that how some partitions with glass tops work?


1

Wall studs should be every 16". If you measure from the start of the wall where the pipes are, you should be able to hit a stud every 16" behind the backing board. I'm not sure what the pipes are that you have in your kitchen - venting maybe, but I would look for shelves that would be supported via studs through the backing board wall instead of trying to ...


1

You mentioned you are not much of a DIYer but you might be able to apply the following. This will be an abbreviated version of a French cleat, which you can google. The cleat instead of being on the horizontal pieces would be on the vertical sides. This process would extend the shelf out from the wall by a CM, but because you would be putting the extra ...


1

If you use long enough lags to get a good bite into the stud, your first proposed method should be fine. If the "lever" action is high enough to snap a lag bolt, then it will be strong enough to snap the 2x3 as well. From a strength perspective, it doesn't matter how long the lag bolt is - the torque and shear at the junction of the wall/bracket interface ...


1

In the US and Canada, the standard reference for the industry is Architectural Woodwork Standards produced by the Architectural Woodwork Institute.


1

Disagree, aquariums do not hold most of their weight under the corners. The weight is almost uniformly distributed on portions that are in contact with the supporting surface. If it is an acrylic tank with no frame, then all that weight is distributed across the whole bottom surface (assuming it is resting on a shelf like you illustrate). If it is a glass ...


1

For that much weight, I would try to drill into the studs. You can find them using a studfinder, or sometimes knocking and listening for the change in pitch will be enough. If in doubt, find several, and assume they are evenly spaced. Make sure the drilled holes and screws are long enough to penetrate well into the stud, say at least 2 inches. Of course, to ...


1

The best way to handle this situation is to span two studs at the end of the closet with a smallish plank, screwing it into both studs. Then you can screw the rod end mount to that plank and rest assured that it's as sturdy as you can get it. The "far" end of that plank will very probably screw to the stud at the far rear corner of the closet's end wall, ...


1

I see no benefit to cutting a section out of the wall before patching it up. You don't say how old your house is, but in the houses I've lived in that are nearing 100 years or so, the plaster can weaken to the point you can pull it apart with your fingers if you damage the surface somewhere. If that is indeed a coat of plaster/insulation on top of the ...



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