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9

The type of shelf pins shown in your photo are able to twist out of crappy MDF or particle board side walls when a lot of torque is placed on the pin due to excessive weight placed upon the shelf. There are alternate types of shelf bracket pins that are designed to keep the pin at 90 degrees to the side wall thus keeping it from torquing out of the hole. ...


9

Cleats. Well, If I didn't simply add up what this expletive redacted liquor cabinet just cost me (not counting husky-containment and mopping time) and shoot it into the sun to be wholly replaced with a decently made hunk of furniture, which I'd be fairly inclined to do after what you just went through. I would glue and screw 1x2 wooden cleats ...


8

I find it hard to believe that a few bottles would tear those pins out, unless either 1) the shelves are too short, resulting in a lot of torsional force, or 2) the pins weren't fully seated. Four pins, even in MDF, should support 100 lbs. easily. Custom and pre-built cabinets around the world use simple dowels for shelf support, even in particle board, and ...


3

Your problem is there's nothing holding the 4 posts in place. The fix is to attach the shelves to the posts as tightly as possible - they can't just set on the posts. What you've basically done is tried to create a large version of these common steel shelves: If you've ever put one together, the strength and stability comes from the wedge anchors on ...


3

No. Drywall isn't meant to have exposed, unsupported edges. If you hang stuff over the edge, it'll probably fail - at the very least, you'll have drywall dust all over your closet. Get some screws, and attach the organizer to the wall studs. (Since the top of the drywall is missing, you'll have no trouble finding the studs.) Take 5 extra minutes, and do the ...


3

The concern is mostly pullout strength, and not shear. The bulk of the leverage of the shelf pulling away from the wall is above the shelf. Therefore, screws above the shelf carry most of the pullout load. It's unlikely that you will have insufficient shear strength if you use 3-4 screws per standard. My point is that you probably won't need the standards ...


2

It will depend on your book load, and whether your "hard maple" is really sugar maple or not. There is, of course, an easy way to deal with the calculations these days. Do be sure to read all the "notes" below the calculator. Shelf thickness (or "depth" in beam speak) cubed is indeed the correct factor, and why even small changes in thickness make large ...


2

I did this once when I lived in an apartment and could not modify anything. Since I had metal working and welding experience, I created a steel frame using 1 inch angle steel. Basically, it was a 'table' that stood inside the closet and it's dimensions where precisely the inside dimensions of the closet; ie; the legs were flush against the walls of the ...


2

If you can avoid floating, I suggest you do. It's inherently weak. (And sooner or later, someone's probably going to try chinups or an entire Encyclopedia Britannica on your work.) If you gotta, Rockler sells these blind shelf supports: http://www.rockler.com/blind-shelf-supports. Hope you're in the US, or shipping/customs might be tough. (My review on ...


2

I took a quick look at the assembly instructions. If you wanted the shelves permanently attached the time to do this was while assembling the cabinet. Instead of using the shelf pins you would use wooden dowels as you did with the non-adjustable shelves. One issue is that the adjustable shelves are going to be slightly shorter than the permanent shelves ...


2

Brackets of the type you want are made. Specifically designed for supporting wall mounted cupboards, white boards, panels etc. These were spotted in a UK web site for SPUR Shelving. You would have to check if the slot height and spacing on SPUR products matches those of the particular twin slot standards that you are considering.


2

Those shelves require a solid base. So you'd have to build a solid base (plywood could work) and attach casters to those. Then attach the shelf to that. However, you still have the issue of moving said shelves. Those shelves are designed primarily for vertical loads and tend to not handle lateral loads well at all...which would be the case when you push or ...


2

There is no "one-step" way to install casters on these types of shelves. You would have to build a base, or affix them to something like a mobile power tool base. In general this would be a lot of work for a potentially dangerous rolling shelf. You would be better off finding a wire-type shelving unit, which are often built either with casters, or slots for ...


2

You don't want to install wheels on those shelves. They will fall apart on you. Instead of trying to find a way to install wheels on shelves, find shelving that is already on wheels and buy that.


2

You should re-consider several of your ideas. The stripping on the wall is an excellent way to support shelves. However do use something like a 1x3 or 1x4 so that the material has some substance and strength. A 1x1 is just too flimsy, can bow between studs and after accepting one screw through it there is not much meat left to the piece. A wider strip ...


2

As @ JPhi1618 has stated try adding a second clamp on the top of the shelves. Before trying that I would try bolting the shelves to the smaller hinge pin hole. For visual appearance sake I would try either a carriage bolt or a flat head screw that is counter sunk.


1

Yes it would be stronger because you could attach more screws. also if resting on the floor gravity wouldnt pull the bracket downward.


1

IMHO a combination of both ideas would be best; a perimeter strip for edge support and a couple brackets midway for center support, kind of like this: Even if you plan to just store lightweight linens, flat spaces often turn into places to store other items in the future, so a robust support design would be better. I agree with other posters that a hollow ...


1

If you modify the opening of the wall piece you could use this: But you would need to be sure of the objects exact location and adjusting the location would require more modification.


1

I'd put ledgers on the walls to the left and right of the shelves. By this I mean a board running horizontally the entire length of the wall, screwed in at the studs. This will give you something with some strength and stability to attach to. You could run a steel pipe across from ledger to ledger, attached to the ledgers with floor flanges. I can say ...


1

Thete are several kinds of supports sold specifically for this purpose, plus the option of using fairly standard triangular brackets upside down and arranging the shelf's contents to hide them.


1

I would consider using a "french cleat". This is a technique where you cut a board into two pieces using a 45 degree angle. I used this to mount some cabinets and they are incredibly strong. It just depends on whether you can adapt that to the shelf you have. Good luck.


1

If you're sagging in the longitudinal direction, support lengthwise. If you can brace or support the entire length of the shelf, you can avoid a lot of the sagging. Sometimes even so much as adding a font lip will go a long way to making the shelves sturdier. Even a 1/2" x 1" strip, fastened with glue and countersunk wood screws will go a long way. If even ...


1

I've wondered this before, too. Honestly I wouldn't trust a horizontal tension rod shelf unless you're putting lightweight, and not breakable, things on it. I know you're renting, but you could install shelves with braces and then just patch the holes when you leave, assuming you can find similar paint. Another alternative is just something like ...


1

Go for the three brackets - you can't guarantee that some little child won't ever be underneath that shelf when the weight of piles of books on it is too much for the shelf or one of the brackets. You don't want to be responsible for that child's head/neck injury.


1

I have "student" bookcases I built years ago, which have 4'-long 1x12 (nominal) shelves supported only be a pair of shelf clips at each end, carrying two solid rows of paperbacks each. (One upright, one tilted back in front of them.) These sag just a bit in the middle, but have no trouble handling the distributed weight. You've got a shorter span, so you ...


1

I would use a hydraulic, similar to what is found on a door. One like the one linked below has a small button you push to set it, and then to release you just relieve the pressure from the hydraulic and it will come down.. Amazon - Hardware Door Closer Hydraulic


1

As an alternative, you could consider what I've done. My desk at the office is electric (I found a good source for electric desks at economical prices and we have several of them). But at home, I raised my entire desk up on blocks so it is at standing height, then got a "drafting stool" style of chair--basically an office chair with a longer gas tube and a ...


1

The device you're describing, sounds like a four-bar linkage. Not sure if you'll be able to find one available that suits your needs, or if you'll have to manufacture it yourself, or if it's even the best design for what you're trying to accomplish. But hopefully that will help you find what you're looking for.



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