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7

Gently hammer up on the bottom, right next to the rail. They jam in place, especially if heavily loaded, and sometimes need persuasion to come loose again. Several light taps will be less likely to go wrong than pounding as hard as you can. Some (not all) will also respond to lifting up on the outermost end. Don't overdo that, or you'll bend them, ...


6

This appears to be a "sawtooth shelf support" like the one shown in this article.


4

You COULD do that, [the adjusters-things you want are called turnbuckles] but it might be a lot simpler (no holes in the ceiling) to use better and larger shelf brackets. Better, in having a brace that makes them a triangle. Larger, making a larger, more stable triangle. A pair of good heavy duty brackets in a large size will make a shelf that you can sit on ...


4

If you buy the pipe at Home Depot, they custom cut it (and thread it) for free. You have to buy the pipe, and there is a fairly flexible policy that they will make up to three cuts per 10 foot length, but if you catch them an hour before closing or when it is not otherwise busy, they are very accommodating.


4

Unscrew the rollers on both sides. Lower the door so it's parallel to the back. Push one end back into the cabinet until the pin is free of the side slot - or start with the door at the back, and pull one end forward until it's free of the side slot (and then keep pulling forward to remove from the case.) Replacement should be the reverse of removal.


3

A 2 piece shelf is a good plan, but my scheme differs from yours from there. Yours would work, but mine's better (IMO). Instead of plywood, I would use MDF. It's dimensionally stable, easy to work, and paints up very nicely with a very smooth surface. I would cut a circular hole to fit the duct closely so small things don't fall into the void below. ...


3

I'd look at a running some braces from underneath the front of the bench back to the wall at a 45 degree angle or so. That will hold a lot of weight.


3

The ease of cutting will come down to the following: The pipe schedule (thickness of the pipe wall) The diameter of the pipe The cutting tool to be used Assuming that the pipe schedule is sch 40 or less and the diameter is 2" or less (larger diameters can limit the cutting tool selection and the increases the effort required to obtain a true parallel ...


3

Depending how you make your joints, if you choose to use screws, they need to go into the joining piece at least 3/4"-1" deep, and deeper when going into the end of a piece, 1 1/2" is a good depth, For this you can use a 2" screw, countersunk a little. The drawing below, may have a little more info than what you are looking for, but it will give you options ...


3

The metric (4 or 5mm) holes can be redrilled to hold the 1/4" shelf spoons. If that does not do it, there are metal sockets for the 1/4" spoons that take a slightly larger hole, then they can be driven into place to hold the larger spoon. If the spoons or clips already have a 1/4" hole, then you may be better off retro fitting a shelf track system. Third ...


2

I found a matching image at http://www.furnitureinfashion.net/beech-home-wall-shelves-lasse-p-6628.html?osCsid=cf4c725a6d1c4b00d50adca495f827d3 which has dimensions of W85cm x D16cm x H47.5cm. As to building it, I've built several like it over the years, and believe it really is up to you. What I mean is you can take this basic design and modify the ...


2

You're better off either cutting them flush or pulling the clips out with pliers and patching the holes. A few years ago I repainted my closets and pantry, and decided it was easier to just uninstall EVERYTHING and start over. I had these anchors, which were pretty much impossible to remove without destroying: The anchors you have are also single-use. If ...


2

Leave it in place, use masking tape, paint around it....


2

The room you're in has some nice crown moulding and probably is a nicely finished room - it's a shame (IMHO) to put in some crappy looking shelf brackets. Just to throw out an alternative suggestion, why not use a product meant for exactly this purpose? There are wall and ceiling mounts for projectors, and look around online and you'll find these starting ...


2

As a newbie, I'd do it like this: Get 4 pine boards and screw them together into a nice shelf sized rectangle. Nail a piece of 1/8" fibreboard or plywood to the back to stabilize the shape. Get more boards for the individual shelves. (these'll have to be cut about 1/2" shorter than the inside of the case's rectangle to accomodate hardware described below) ...


2

There are libraries of reference material out there so I'll just give you three that are suitable for beginner, intermediate, and advanced. When I say "advanced" I don't mean that you are an advanced woodworker, but that you have a desire to get a little deeper into the theory and underlying concepts than someone that's just trying to bang together some ...


2

Plastic plug in a hole, I've always found drilling into it with a bit slightly smaller and stopping the drill, then pulling it straight out works dandy. If not, it gives to a place to try using a screw (and a nailpuller on the screw if it's REALLY stubborn) more easily. Then look for metal replacement brackets in the correct size for your bookshelf so it ...


1

I'd go two screws per wall stud thru the top and middle shelf. The weight of the thing is supported by the structure itself so all you need to do is keep it from falling over. Use a 4 1/2 inch timber tech or a 5/16 lag with a washer and you'll have two inches of screw into the stud which is adequate but a minimum. Make sure you install shims or a spacer to ...


1

You could also drill out a much larger hole (3/4" seems good to me) and glue in a wooden (non-particle board) plug. After the glue is dried, drill the proper size hole in the plug.


1

The best way to handle this situation is to span two studs at the end of the closet with a smallish plank, screwing it into both studs. Then you can screw the rod end mount to that plank and rest assured that it's as sturdy as you can get it. The "far" end of that plank will very probably screw to the stud at the far rear corner of the closet's end wall, ...


1

I see no benefit to cutting a section out of the wall before patching it up. You don't say how old your house is, but in the houses I've lived in that are nearing 100 years or so, the plaster can weaken to the point you can pull it apart with your fingers if you damage the surface somewhere. If that is indeed a coat of plaster/insulation on top of the ...


1

Why don't you use a standard sized and threaded pipe for your shelves? Sizes range from 1" to 8'(foot) in lengths and 1/2" to 3" in half inch increments on the widths, in stock and on the shelves at Home D or just about any DIY Big Box Store. This way you could create whatever you like and probably wind up within an inch or so of wherever you want it to ...


1

I think you can use toggle bolts based on my experience with them and on the ratings given here: http://www.powers.com/pdfs/plastic/togglebolt.pdf.


1

For that much weight, I would try to drill into the studs. You can find them using a studfinder, or sometimes knocking and listening for the change in pitch will be enough. If in doubt, find several, and assume they are evenly spaced. Make sure the drilled holes and screws are long enough to penetrate well into the stud, say at least 2 inches. Of course, to ...


1

Walls aren't made out of solid plaster. Plaster is merely a coating. If its hard and 'crumbling' all the way through, my guess is it's a masonry block (or brick) wall coated in plaster. Knowing what region of the world you live in may help us narrow down the potential building technique for you. If it is masonry, there are two things you need to do: 1) ...


1

Those look like the Closetmaid ones. If you just remove the nail you can gently pull the plastic out. Me I would just paint over them if it's just a closet.


1

Measure each space between shelves carefully. You might even do a template for each. Take it to Lowes and have them cut mirror for you to the correct size. Use mirror adhesive to glue each mirror onto the wall. You may need to do one at a time and shimmy them up to hold until they dry.


1

I am having the same problem! Small kitchen and I've been searching for the very same thing. This is the closest to what I'm looking for I have found (only holds about 20lbs, I think my microwave is heavier). http://www.bes-products.com/microwave.html# http://www.bes-products.com/pdf/microwave.pdf Let me know if you have found anything since you ...



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