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23

I'd use plywood with a thicker piece of hardwood glued onto the front edge. This gives you very good strength. Here is an online calculator I use to find what kind of materials you can use and the amount of sag you will have. Here's a good quote from the author of the site. “The eye will notice a deflection of 1/32″ per running foot.” The sagulator


18

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


16

I'd try a few of these keyhole mounting plates: You'd need to be very precise with screw placement so everything lines up properly. If you're feeling adventurous, you could chisel or route out a recess so the whole thing is flush against the wall. You could also mount the plates to the wall at a stud, using sufficiently long screws, and then use smaller ...


15

"Not square" can mean two different things: not a right-angle, or rounded. If the walls are not at right angles, you can use a T-bevel to measure the angle between the walls. If you don't have a T-bevel, you can hold a piece of light cardboard against one wall and fold it so the crease is against the other, which you can use as a template for cutting the ...


14

You might consider mounts like z-clips These are listed as 1 7/8 inches high overall, but you might be able to trim the height (a little off the top piece, a little off the bottom) to just a bit less than the thickness of a 2x4, recess them into the back of the piece, leaving a small lip of wood at the top to conceal the mount (the bottom would have to be ...


12

Strong and light and cheap? Take a look at torsion box construction. Granted it's not exactly thin but as @Joe mentioned, getting all four of those qualities is a tall order.


11

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


11

Enter The Sagulator - it's a free online calculator for sag of shelves which is a wonderful tool exactly for these questions. Running your 2 shelf sizes, the larger shelf span (122 CM) won't hold more than about 2 KG overall without noticeably sagging. The shorter shelf (61 CM) can hold about 10 KG overall. As you can see, 10 MM plywood isn't that stiff ...


10

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


8

I just had another random thought on this ... hollow door blanks. Yes, it's thicker, and you'd have to get them just the right length, as you can't trim 'em down too much, but the construction would make it quite stiff ... it's actually similar to the honeycomb idea ... the honeycomb isn't to give strength, it's to make sure that the top and bottom layer ...


8

You could try a plywood shelf with a run of EMT or other rigid pipe underneath. Hang the pipe with some closet flanges, and then lay the shelf on top of those. To cover it up, you could paint the pipe, and cover the front of the shelf with a face frame.


8

There are jigs available at woodwork supply stores to do just what you need, along with special drill bits that will go the proper depth, since you're dealing with existing holes, you might need to find one that will line up with those.


8

Do you need more shelves, or do you just need one of the existing shelves to be at a different height? If it's the latter, it may be easier for you to add some supports underneath one of the existing shelves like this: The supports should run the depth of the cabinet, and you can attach them with command strips or double-sided tape. Be careful removing ...


8

You want strong and cheap and light and thin? You're asking for a lot. You can get lighter by making a laminated shelf with honeycomb in between ... but it won't be that cheap, or all that thin. You can get cheap and light by adding a couple of stringers along the bottom as stiffeners, but it won't be all that thin. You could use something other than ...


8

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


8

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can be drilled, routed or ...


7

Several different factors weigh in to what size of board you need. Weight - Definitely the major factor. Stud spacing - I'm assuming you've got standard 16" OC studs, and that you're attaching the support board to every one it spans. Location of Mounting Points - The closer the mounts for the shelving are to centered between studs, the higher the bending ...


7

150 lbs is a very heavy set of shelves, unless the bottom sits on the floor and you only need to secure it to the wall so it won't tip forward. In any case, there is no written limit on weight, but a lot of common sense has to be used in this case. You will want to know what the rating of the "L" brackets are and if strong enough to hold your load. They ...


7

The limit is effectively defined by brackets and fixings you use and the type of wall you are fixing it to. Make sure you get brackets and screws that can take the expected weight (plus a little bit more). If you've got a brick/breeze block wall then (generally) the longer and fatter (size) the screw the more load it can bear - as long as you've used the ...


7

Unsupported 1x12 over a 5' span will sag (even under its own weight). As an alternative you could get some of these shelf tracks (~$2.25/track) and some 12" brackets (~$1.30/brace) and then lay your 1x12's on top to make the shelves. This option also allows you to easily adjust the shelves up and down, to suit your needs. If you want to make the ...


7

Depending upon how large the grout lines are I would carefully drill through those with a masonry bit, and then use plastic anchors and fasten shelf brackets with screws. Use enough brackets to support the size shelf you need. Then, if the shelf ever needs to come down the holes in the grout lines can be repaired easily.


7

Shelf construction If the shelf has its front open edge positioned such that at each four feet the cable would go up to a separate roof truss than I think that you have a workable system. Make sure that your 2x3's under the outer shelf edges are placed to that the nominal "3" inch dimension is vertical. Hardware Note that the lowest cost eyebolts, known ...


7

You could create a mounting strip using a dovetail router bit. Route out a dovetail slot along the backside of the long 2x4's. Top and bottom if you want, or just the top. (Bottom half of picture.) Create the mounting strip. (Top half of picture.) Pre-drill holes in the mounting strip to line up with the studs in your wall. Mount the strip on the wall. ...


7

Gently hammer up on the bottom, right next to the rail. They jam in place, especially if heavily loaded, and sometimes need persuasion to come loose again. Several light taps will be less likely to go wrong than pounding as hard as you can. Some (not all) will also respond to lifting up on the outermost end. Don't overdo that, or you'll bend them, ...


6

Brick-and-board shelves are more of a makeshift, anything-goes project. However: Securing the shelving to the wall is a good idea, especially in an earthquake-prone area. Putting the bricks all in vertical lines will stop the boards from bending as much. Cinder blocks are a good choice, as the stacks for bricks can topple.


6

Put shelf boards on horizontal rods of steel which are set into drilled holes in the wall, with the rods perpendicular to the length of the shelf. Grooves may be cut in the bottom of the boards to fixate them on the rods. Depending on the thickness of the boards, you may even be able to hide the rods. Yay! Magic Shelf! This will only work if your wall is ...


6

Find an opening in the wall. Start with the easy ones, telephone and cable wiring. Other options are under the sink were plumbing lines come through. Utility rooms are another good place to look. And finally, you can try checking under the insulation in the attic. Typical drywall will be two layers of paper and a white plaster in the middle and is often ...


6

55 inches is a rather long span for a 12 inch wide shelf that is supported on the ends and back side by the wall. One way that you could provide some more support for the shelves would be to add some center front supports for the shelves working up from the floor to the top shelf.


6

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small ...


6

I find all the above answers to be quite good, but each is too busy for my tastes ... too many pieces, specialty hardware etc ... My solution would be to ... locate the studs drive 2.5" nails into the studs such that they angle upwards have 1" exposed I'd use either of these 8d or 10d nails: box nails, and a pair of vise-grips or slip-joints to cut ...



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