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5

The verbiage of the laws is very important. After some research, I think I've found what you're referring to. Outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not needing planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions: Outbuildings and garages to be single storey with maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum ...


4

As with any advice you get here, keep in mind that you must stay within the bounds of IRC building codes adopted by your local municipality. Obtain a building permit and a local inspector will give you guidelines on minimum requirements for posts, beam spans, joist spans, etc... Your concrete piers must be a set depth to go below the frost line in your ...


4

You'll need to check your local codes. In the US, most building code sections begin with a list of definitions, and I assume it's the same elsewhere. If the difference between a shed and a garage is legally significant then they probably define it. It could be based on size, intended use, access to utilities, proximity to other buildings, access to a ...


3

The roof loading transmits straight down, so the shorter wall and the taller wall will be bearing exactly the same roof load. Shed roofs can leave the structure a bit more prone to racking, which is basically the tendency of a square to deform into a trapezoid: You'll be fine if you do a couple of things. First, sheath the walls with 4' x 8' sheet ...


3

Safe loads are determined through engineering and experimentation. The experimentation is used to gather real-world data, which then is used as input to engineering processes, which then result in guidelines and building codes. This is all updated over time as new materials are introduced and new experience is gained. When there's a situation that is ...


3

You have electrical in your shed. Before doing anything that branch needs to be terminated correctly. I don't think there is a pure art to the small demo. I personally would slice the front wall beams halfway up with whatever saw I thought would be the quickest and then sledge hammer from the corners. Roof should fall/slide down. Then I would just ...


2

Pressure treated wood should be dried out before painting. 3 monthes - a year depending on climate. I would go with a good primer first before painting. Use floor paint for floor or just go with a solid stain.


2

Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


2

Impossible to say. The shed was designed to be supported in a particular manner. It has to be supported that way. If you're not inclined to that, though, an intermediate structure can be built underneath the shed that will support the shed in that manner, and which itself is designed to be supported in some other way, such as an array of 9 footings. Kind ...


2

Drill a hole, or a recess, into the bottom plate of the prefab wall, so the bolts holding the sill plate to the concrete just slide right in/through. Or, drill a similar recess into the sill plate, recess the nut into the sill plate (probably with a washer to spread the load over the thinner wood), and grind/cut the bolt off level with the top of the ...


2

I would advertise "Free Shed" on Craigslist. I had a tree house I constructed for my grand kids, and when they outgrew it that's what I did. Some folks came out one Saturday, disassembled it, and took it away. They did the whole job. I just got to watch.


1

First, sort out the electrical and be triply certain it's disconnected but good. Then, place an ad for "free shed, you remove" Then place an ad for "free fill - unwanted Concrete slab, you break it up and take it away." Only if those fail do you need to worry about removing it yourself. Sucks to be Blake + Steve - not even two years use (it doesn't look ...


1

Personally, I would dig the topsoil out from under the blocks—preferably down to mineral soil so that almost all of the concrete is buried. This makes less of a step up for wheeled equipment and less space for critters and weeds to grow underneath. I put mine very close to the ground on concrete blocks with slots for 2 inch wide lumber and concrete ...


1

Enough heat is the first need. Insulated sheds get cold inside, moisture condenses. Water can even freeze. As my boss found out with his boat. Insulation just means that cold nights make the interior get progressively colder and not get any thermal gain during the daytime, unless your floor has surface area that transmits enough ground heat. And if you ...


1

To resist wind forces, you don't necessarily need footings below frost line, but you do need a substantial mass to resist the overturning forces from wind. Buried footings work well because the the wind must also pick up a substantial amount of earth in addition to the foundation weight. The deeper the footing, the more earth being picked up, so it is a good ...


1

By looking at some mobile home anchoring systems you might be able to adapt something to a smaller scale. They appear similar to the screw in the earth anchors used for dog run tie outs albeit on a larger scale. I would screw in three dog anchors on each side and use a ratcheting cargo strap (available at any auto parts store) to cinch it down. It may take ...


1

Man I hate saying this because I just love when people reuse things and even the bigger bonus for using it in a creative way but I personally wouldn't. Sounds like you have a lot of leftovers. I would try to use them elsewhere in the house or sell them for others to use. My problem with putting it in a shed is that the oak planks don't handle water well, ...



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