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4

Assuming that the walls are standard wood construction, with dimensional lumber, pulling out the door and putting in a standard entry door is fairly straightforward. First take out the rolling door. It's best to do this in the reverse order that it was put in. Carefully remove / release the tension on any springs or lift assists that may be in place. If the ...


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Do you have sufficient variance between the house and your property line to allow for the addition of this shed there? Is there a zoning or housing code you need to check? Are you getting a permit for this? Most parts of the country require a building permit for anything that attaches to the residence. Having it permitted protects your future resale ...


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If the two halves of the shed are built to be structurally sound while separate, then there is no reason that each roof can't be built slightly asymmetrically so that one overlaps a portion of the other to provide weatherproof protection, like this: Some tweaking of the interface would be needed to make it practical and convenient, but the basic idea ...


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Why not put a shallow triangle slightly inset from each side and one in the center? These could be hinged to lie flat against the bottom of the ramp for storage. Use a hook and eye on the side opposite the hinge to lock the wedges in place when in use.


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If you want a flat ramp with no supports it will have to be of steel, probably at least 3/8" and that sucker will be extremely heavy. Also, you will need strong anchors where it latches to the shed because that is where all the force will be applied. Normally, for something like this you always have support of some kind. For a removable solution the ...


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All structures in the US State of Georgia are required to be constructed in accordance with the International Building Code series*...the requirements of საქართველო in the Caucuses were not immediately available online, unfortunately. General requirements for foundations are stated in the applicable code. Site specific requirements depend upon multiple ...


1

I think: No, it is not a good idea. You can expect all the difficulties of renovation, new construction, and building relocation, combined. Perhaps also conflicts with land use regulations as well. Without tying the roof to the adjacent structure, expect water damage to both the shed and the home. Support for the shed should be suitable for the soil and ...


1

Sticking to item 1 : what difficulties might you expect: Practically speaking, cutting it in half and moving it will be a problem (or a "challenge" as the folk who like to pretend that problems don't exist like to euphemize.) Moving a shed is awkward enough when it's a complete structure. Once you cut it in half you'll lose a good deal of what structure it ...


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Although the modern trend is fast stuffing more & more lumber in the wall, walls framed with 2x4s on 24" centers will support nearly any sort of roof load you're likely to ever see - especially if you don't live in a far northern climate. I've seen 2nd-floor hot tubs with far less support than that. You do have to be pretty careful laying out the studs; ...


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Personally, I would dig the topsoil out from under the blocks—preferably down to mineral soil so that almost all of the concrete is buried. This makes less of a step up for wheeled equipment and less space for critters and weeds to grow underneath. I put mine very close to the ground on concrete blocks with slots for 2 inch wide lumber and concrete ...



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