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4

A locksmith can order (if necessary) and set up padlocks or locking hasps that respond to your house key, unless the house lock is using a particularly uncommon key blank. They may be a bit larger than the ones designed to be sold in bulk, and they will probably be a bit more expensive, but the price shouldn't be unreasonable.


4

It looks like your building has studs. The best way to insulate between those studs is low-cost batt insulation, either fiberglass or mineral wool. If you want to use polystyrene foam sheets (like the EPS foam you're showing) the easiest and most cost-effective way to do it is to lay it across the studs, not between them. Use the cheap batts between the ...


3

(1) The fan as shown in the photo is upside down. Mounted in this position, the weight of the fan will pull the plate away from the beam. Turn it over so the weight will push the plate against the beam. (2) The beam will hold the fan but the weight will apply a twisting force to the beam. To overcome this, you should mount a board vertically from the beam ...


3

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


2

Get Local Building Dept. approval, they'll direct you on this as well. But, 4" of tamped sand only works if it's retained, it washes away. Tamped 3/4" jagged gravel at 4" deep is the best choice. The bigger issue is tying the building down from wind loft. This is where a concrete filled cinderblock & poured concrete foundation may be required. Don't mess ...


2

Almost any door should be hung plumb on both axes, level, and square. Not doing so results in undesirable movement due to gravity along with other adverse functional issues. In this case, I'd hang the door roughly centered in the opening using shims, then I'd apply casing on the outside to cover the uneven gaps. Optionally case the inside as well. I'd then ...


2

Yes, the poured, floated & sealed afterward slab is the best way to go, if you're up to it, & it's the best anchor. Definitely do at least a 4-inch bed of gravel under everything, this is what moves instead of a slab or blocks or pads. However, absolutely consult your Building Dept. first & foremost. They have plans for their requirements & ...


2

Sorry, qtron. You really should've mentioned you were using this shed as a workshop or something & trying to cool it. I realize you might say "why would I have insulated it otherwise". We have no way of knowing unless you say, we see many weird actions taken by people. Cooling changes everything! In that case, you have the foil of the adequate ...


2

If you look closely at the boards on the inside, you will see they are overlapping, the top edge being behind the bottom edge of the board above (behind when viewed from the outside). This is standard clapboard type construction (although many modern clapboards have a tapered upper edge and the overlap is much greater). Rain tends to drip off the lower edge ...


1

Solar load (which heats the building to 95 on a 68 degree day) is a real problem. Insulation will make things better, not worse. The #1 thing you can do is paint the roof white. Yes, I know that's hard and weird, but it really does work. Soffit and roof vents, obviously, make it a lot harder to heat a shed. Maybe the architect was concerned with ...


1

you can just replace your house lock or locks with weiser smartkey units, and then buy a weiser smart keyed padlock. i have six smartkey locks on the doors in my home, and a dozen or so padlocks. all can be operated with a single key. and, as a bonus, you can rekey your locks yourself in about 30 seconds.


1

i would wedge a length of plastic gutter on a slight slope between the 2 sheds , making a small gap and encouraging the water to run into the gutter and into a down pipe directing it away from both sheds. You may have to experiment a little for the height of this


1

The wood framing member looks to be similar to a 2 x 4 (inch) commonly used here in the States as wall studs and such. From what is obvious from the photo that leads me to believe it will support the almost 50 pound fan is the wood top plate is on edge rather than oriented on its' face (flat). The wood plate is much stronger in this direction and can with ...


1

Homemade skylights are a bit tough. But, you basically want to have the top & sides under the roofing & the bottom on top of the roofing. Set the panels in a thick bead of caulk, silicone or not & screw down either through the panels or with brackets. The polycarbonate's channels would be best run horizontal to the pitch rather than downward ...


1

you can reinforce the bond in your aggregate with unwaxed polyester resin. just make sure you add acetone to the mix and use very little catalyst. that will make it dilute enough to wick into the existing substrate, and the slow cat will let it have time to get in there before it kicks. we use it quite often for reinforcement in places its too cost ...



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