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5

Firewood needs to dry out. It won't dry out in a sealed shed nearly as fast and completely as it would in an open-air setup. Worry about moisture in the air 'getting back in' to the wood isn't really much of a concern. It's not atmospheric moisture but the moisture that's in the wood initially that's the concern. If you completely season your wood ...


4

It looks like your building has studs. The best way to insulate between those studs is low-cost batt insulation, either fiberglass or mineral wool. If you want to use polystyrene foam sheets (like the EPS foam you're showing) the easiest and most cost-effective way to do it is to lay it across the studs, not between them. Use the cheap batts between the ...


4

Assuming that the walls are standard wood construction, with dimensional lumber, pulling out the door and putting in a standard entry door is fairly straightforward. First take out the rolling door. It's best to do this in the reverse order that it was put in. Carefully remove / release the tension on any springs or lift assists that may be in place. If the ...


3

Won't be airtight anyway, and if you are buying dry wood (that is) it won't matter if it somehow manages to approximate airtight. Ventilation is for actively drying.


3

(1) The fan as shown in the photo is upside down. Mounted in this position, the weight of the fan will pull the plate away from the beam. Turn it over so the weight will push the plate against the beam. (2) The beam will hold the fan but the weight will apply a twisting force to the beam. To overcome this, you should mount a board vertically from the beam ...


2

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


1

The wood framing member looks to be similar to a 2 x 4 (inch) commonly used here in the States as wall studs and such. From what is obvious from the photo that leads me to believe it will support the almost 50 pound fan is the wood top plate is on edge rather than oriented on its' face (flat). The wood plate is much stronger in this direction and can with ...


1

For an uninsulated shed I usually find exposed studs more useful for hanging/storing most tools, with the occasional board where that's not true. Anyway, for a dry, uninsulated, unheated shed, you need not do anything more than nail (or screw) it to the framing. I would actively avoid @Chris Cudmore's "gap" suggestion, however, since it sounds like making ...



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