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11

The two most common sources I've seen are dried out traps and a failing wax seal under the toilet. A failing wax seal may also result in water damage appearing from beneath the toilet. The dried out traps are simple to fix, just run a little water into each drain every few months. For a, more rare, problem at a PVC joint, you'll need to find the offending ...


7

I was able to find a reference to this in chapter 22 of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Household Solutions. Though honestly, I've never heard of this approach until now. I'm no expert on the corrosiveness of salt, but I would imagine the levels of salt in the sewer would not be high enough to rust the pipe. I'm also skeptical that the salt levels ...


6

Septic systems leach out into the surrounding area (called a "leach field"). This helps reduce the number of times the system needs pumped out. Liquid (and some solid) waste is broken down and leaches out into the field. Some municipalities don't like this because it has the potential to contaminate local water sheds (most notably if you're near a river). A ...


5

You didn't mention if the drain pipe is accessible from under the floor. Assuming it does not pass directly through a concrete slab, the only safe way to terminate and seal the pipe from backwash and septic gas is to cut it off and glue the proper sized cap on with primer and PVC cement. If and when you need to reinstall the drain, simply cut off the pipe ...


5

Sounds like you are smelling sewer gases. Two common ways those will come up drain lines are from a dry trap (make sure water has run in each drain within the past several months) or a failing wax seal under the toilet (you may notice water damage under the toilet when this happens, but not always). The other issue could be a blocked vent line which would ...


5

If your shower (or any drain) is draining to your sump pit, you are overworking your sump pump and shortening it's life span. If you have a radon mitigation system that uses the sump pit, you are also creating a situation where radon can potentially enter your house. The only water that should ever be in the sump pit, is ground water. Aside from that, here ...


5

It is obvious to me that the main sewer line is restricted somewhere between the house and town line. In areas that allow storm drains to be coupled to sewer lines, it is important that these lines run freely. If yours is backing up with kitchen waste, there is only one solution. You need to have the line checked with a camera. you could have a simple ...


4

Your problem is the sewer, not the "fresh" water. Activity on another floor is almost certainly sucking water out of the sewer trap at your laundry and/or bathroom sink. The dry trap then has no resistance to rising sewer gas. Doing laundry fills the trap back up. Here's what it might look like in the wall behind your laundry machine. For proper ...


4

My guess, and it's only a guess, is that that pipe is where the downspout used to attach to the sewer system. Until very recently, downspouts used to connect directly to the sewage system. Many municipalities have passed laws mandating the removal of these connections because the treatment plant would often overflow during a storm, leading to the dumping ...


4

Gurgling indicates a blocked or improper vent somewhere. It could be a blockage where the vent goes up immediately after the shower trap. It could also be an improper vent that is installed too far from the trap, and the sump hole could easily be too far away. For example, if you flush the toilet and it goes down the same drain as the shower, it will be ...


4

Most homes will merge the vent pipes as they go up the walls so that you only have one vent exiting the roof. All vents need to slope upwards, so the guest house couldn't run the vent underground to use the vent stack in your home. That said, if you notice that drain lines are gurgling after the water goes down (indicating suction) or are slow to drain but ...


3

I have never done this. The first thought that comes to mind is an auto from the "rust belt" where rock salt is used to treat icy roads. the result is corrosion. I would think that the pipes would be damaged. If you don't have municipal sewerage I don't see it being healthy for your septic system.


3

You will need PVC cement and primer, and a female pipe adapter (available at your local or big-box hardware store; measure your existing plug -- it looks like 4" in the photo). Dig out around the pipe to get enough room to saw it off near ground level (any sharp hand saw will work). De-burr the edge with a piece of course sandpaper or a file, and follow ...


3

It depends, if the sewer is well designed, well built and does not have any issues, and you don't put a lot of fat down it will be ok for a very long time with no maintenance. However if it "has issues" then you may wish to have it snaked before it gets blocks and becomes an expensive after hours service call. The problem is you wont know until it gets ...


2

Most sewage ejection pumps have two cords. One is the power for the motor. The other goes to the float switch. The power cord is a regular plug. The float switch cord has a plug on the end with female on one side and male on the other. The power's plug is inserted into the female side of the float switch plug. The male side of the float plug is then ...


2

You have a couple of options. If this does not happen often, you can likely put a stopper in the drains which backup in the house, and just wait until the sewer is no longer clogged. To do this, you can purchase a "test plug" for each drain that is experiencing the backup (if you also get backup in a toilet, you will need to pull the toilet to install ...


2

I'm not sure exactly what kind of pipe that is, but they make runner plugs that you put inside the pipe, and then tighten a wing nut to expand it to seal. After you cut it off, try that. If that doesn't work, maybe just put a regular cap over it with the correct cement for that kind of pipe.


2

Whatever it is, it did it's job. Looks like the cap blew off (the white thing to the right) and the backed up sewage came out of the pipe instead of in your house! I am guessing they didn't use a screw on cap or glued on, for this reason. Maybe the sewer backing up happened often and the homeowner had this put in? Call a plumber to look into it more and ...


2

I don't think it's common for this to be a regular occurance unless something is wrong with the sewer like a collapse, a belly, roots intruding or incorrectly sized. If there is something wrong with it, then this is not regular scheduled maintenance but a workaround for a larger problem. If you have any doubts the only real way to know is to have a camera ...


2

Fernco makes rubber caps that you would put a stainless worm-gear clamp around. Take your outside diameter measurement to a plumbing supply house.. What your have is a main drain and cleanout wye. As suggested by dmoore, future plumbing may be connected, though its not a toilet flange. Its likely the point of exit for the drain system (from the house), as ...


2

You would gain... Sewer gas explosion. Never should sewer vents be exposed to any ignition source... In mines it's known as firedamp and it kills indiscriminately. All it takes is the proper ratio of flammable gas to oxygen and you have a fuel-air explosive. Sewer gas is vented to the atmosphere for several reasons: it displaces oxygen sulphide gasses ...


1

The right way to do it is dig out and repour the concrete in the area. This isn't that hard or expensive. If you want just a stopgap until you decide what you are doing with your main line then you could get a bucket of hydraulic cement and patch over the existing concrete. The cracked concrete should not be affecting your stack - hopefully - so this is ...


1

Chances are you won't feel the street, because the snake will just head on down the sewer main. You'll want to measure. The fancy snakes have readouts of the distance for exactly this reason. Also check your line for additional cleanouts. My jurisdiction requires a two way cleanout right at the curb line.


1

I've done this a few times and I've never been able to "feel" when you hit the street. Maybe someone who does this often acquires more of a feel. I'm at least 50ft from my street, so perhaps it's just because there's a lot of resistance from the 50ft of snake in the line. The easiest way (other than a camera of course) to know you're at the street is to ...


1

“Periodically” is the key word. Keep a log of what water usage (if any) you’re using when the offensive odors blossom and look for correlations. Might want to keep a log of what you’re feeding the dog too. (grin) The source of odors may have nothing to do with your water usage. A friend can tell the speed of the wind by fluttering of water in one of ...


1

Sewer pump should be hooked up to GFCI. So that is the first step - change out the outlet to a GFCI. The reason this will help you is first it is code in some places and second if the pump is the culprit then it will pop the GFCI outlet. Also is this a 20 or 15 amp circuit. Some sewer pumps are rated for 20 amps and above. I actually have almost the ...


1

Typically, o-ring fittings are used for larger diameter pipes (4 inch and larger) where the runs consist of longer distances with a low density of fittings. Examples would be outside of the building civil work and inside (below grade) storm drainage. When you have smaller diameter pipes and a high density of fittings, such as a bathroom group, glue fittings ...


1

no its gonna be bad in the long run----a lot of piping underground is made from cast iron---the salt water will be an electrolyte and it will eventually eat the pipe ,atom by atom (or ion by ion ) if your piping is plastic based it connects somewhere to a cast iron line----if you flooded the soil around the outside of the pipes it would (i think ) keep ...


1

We are currently have major issues with our sewer line and have come to find out a few items of interest: *Most home owner's insurance policies do not cover plumbing; if a pipe breaks, then it is the homeowner's responsibility to have it repaired since it wasn't maintained properly. (freezing pipes are a different story) *Most home owner's insurance ...


1

The best option that I can think of would be to have the sewer lined. This company is simply the first Google search result I found: http://www.dontdig.com/drainlining.php The premise here is that a flexible liner is inserted into the pipe (usually using air - think of it as turning a sock inside out) and then the liner is hardened in place (water ...



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