Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I recall several cases where a car was stolen from the airport long-term parking lot, the car's GPS system directed the thieves straight to the car owner's house ("Home" or "Location #1"), the garage door opener in the vehicle let them in and they used the tools in the garage to open the interior door. Load up the car with valuables then drive away. The ...


0

Would locking it make it more secure? Sure. Does it matter? Only if you aren't home. Anyone who breaks into your garage when you aren't home will certainly use the garage cover to break through the door if you aren't home. Unless you have a steel door on a steel frame this is probably short work. If you are home, I have never heard of someone opening ...


1

If your garage door opener is made in the last 10-15 years, it's almost certainly impossible to "hack" the code. Modern openers use unique codes for each remote with 64- or 128-bit keys (which allow for a ridiculously huge number of possibilities). However, it can be really easy to break into a garage mechanically, using the quick release: As others ...


0

Add a second remote to turn off (deenergize the outlet) your opener, after you lower your door. This will prevent an opening by a casual hacker. There are a number of remotes available for home automation, some are plug in and would not require any wiring. The Z-wave solutions come to mind(which would require a hub. I did this back in the day with an ...


0

I've never had an attached garage but if I did, I'd have a gate latch deadbolt because I'd be too lazy to lock it every time and wouldn't want to forget. I have one installed in a common area with a stay-unlocked-lever for convenience (for taking out the trash, ect.) I'd at least have a classic deadbolt to throw when I'm home. I've driven down many an ...


1

It mostly depends on the type of garage door (composite slider, thin aluminium, or solid wood flip up etc... ) but generally the automated motors connected to your door are extremely tough at preventing a forced opening (i.e by hand) The problem comes where most garage openers have a quick release coupler which is made from plastic (i.e it can get ...


1

I think it all depends on yourself. Just remember that if someone is intruding in your garage already they can pretty much break that door without to much disturbance form outside. If your concern is slightly better security yes lock it. Only real regulatory concern that I know of is that inside garage doors (at least where I live in South Africa) need ...


0

What I would use is 0.2mm Ripcord (think its 1/64in) you typically buy them in rolls of about 300ft and its reasonably cheap. The nice thing about ripcord, is that its easy to break, and it actually lasts a lifetime (and can be painted). I would not reccommend that you keep this on the exterior though. Also you can easily stick this to your siding using ...


1

No wire at all - fiber optic cable does the best/hardest to bypass job for this sort of thing. If using wire, something outside rated, and perhaps with 2-4 conductors rather than just one (you can use one or all; if some problem other than someone cutting through the building develops, you can use as few as 1 if at least one remains intact.) Be careful ...


1

The trade answer is a toner and probe, it is also the easiest. An amazon search for ' telephone tracer ' will show a range of products I am talking about. A toner is the tool that the phone company supplies to their employees that need to find a specific pair of wires in a cable, or inside a wall. Other places use them too. The tool is art meets science ...


0

Are you sure you want to run ethernet for your security camera's? an alternative is to run Coaxial cable with power. The cable is an integrated cable (one coaxial and one power) see RG59 Siamese cable Yes. this is not digital. But at least you have the increased reliability of Coax and reduced cost of the camera's. Remember your DVR can convert to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included