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I've been using Little Red Caps for the past two years; they're little rubber caps that you roll over the end of a caulk tip, and they seem to make a nice tight seal. I've used them with drywall glue, construction adhesive, and silicone caulks, and all were easy to use and reuse. I've been using one particular tube of silicone caulk for six months, about ...


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I prefer a hot-dip-galvanized 16d common nail; something in the zinc seems to slow down curing a little. If the caulk still dries in the tube, I curse myself for being so all-fired cheap and go buy another tube - each tube costs less than a pack of cigarettes, a gallon of gasoline, or a cheap meal.


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I supposed one could seal it easily with some polycaprolactone. It's a thermoreversible hard plastic which remelts to a clear putty like state when dipped in boiling water for a minute. It can be reused over and over and when cooled back down returns to hard white plastic. it bonds extremely well to other plastics like the plastic used for the nozzle of ...


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If it's porous, it's not granite. It may be marble or some other stone, but granite is too dense to take on any appreciable water. That's why it's used extensively for curbs and sidewalks in Vermont, where winter weather is REALLY COLD - if it took on moisture, that moisture would freeze and blow our curbs & sidewalks apart (a technique actually applied ...


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I would glue down the lifting edges, then take a caulking gun to seal the edges.


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Not saying I'm an expert, but I did just finish scraping up about the same square footage of old mastic (asbestos-free!) from my basement. Obviously the real answer is to try various things to see what works best, but in my case, I found a long-handled razor scraper and a lot of elbow grease managed to get up the majority of my problem. Because the mastic ...


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Just from the pattern of the floor, that is not from the mid 80's or earlier (when Asbestos was used). My guess, that floor is only about 10 years old as that pattern has an early 2000's vibe to it.


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Don't try to fix this yourself. If it isn't asbestos, why bother. If it is asbestos, trying to fix it yourself could make you liable for any damage you cause by futzing with it. Imagine your pain if the landlord charged you for asbestos removal because you "disturbed" it and created an unsafe situation. And since you don't own the property, you probably ...


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After experimenting with a lot of different options, I found Australian Timber Oil (Natural) works the best and has the best color for cedar.


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First I would determine how old the siding is. If made in the last 20 years it's probably covered by manufacturer warranty and replacing it with vinyl would be a step backwards. Also lap siding isn't supposed to seal on the bottom. It's supposed to allow any moisture or condensation that happens to get under the boards to drain downwards. So you should ...



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