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its butyl sealant. it still works fine, but nowadays you can use a polyurethane sealant for superior results.


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In fact, you can clear these windows up. If its regular glass, two small holes are drilled and a cleaning solution (which need not be toxic) injected. If it is tempered glass, the same procedure is possible if the glass seal can be reached for drilling (this is possible for most windows that can open and close: they'd get drilled from an edge). Check the ...


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Rain really will not hurt unless the deck is wet when you seal it. If wet when sealed depending on the type of sealer it may be ok (water based) or with oil based it will not adhere as well.


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Yep, caulk it and paint it with paintable caulk and exterior paint (after a good "surface prepping"). Use a dark shade to help hide foot scuffs. Don't caulk inside the metal threshold, it probably needs to be able weep water. Just caulk it where it meets the wood, and all around where the wood abuts the building, even if it's not cracked, yet. The problem ...


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you can drill holes in glass with the right bit for a standard drill. make a 1/4" hole @ the top inside of your window. make a 2nd hole @ the bottom diagonally on the outside. attach a tube to the bottom hole so it will drain the contents of the window into a bucket. now the dangerous part. get hydrofluoric acid @ 1% or less. fill window and let sit for 1 ...


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I have had the same problem with vinyl frame windows. There is nothing you can do except replace the window. With vinyl windows, you can usually replace the entire sash quite easily. Contact the manufacturer or the contractor that did the orignal install. Most manufacturers offer a warranty against fogging for a certain number of years, so be sure to check ...


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No. You're limited by what you can do from the outside, and obviously that's not much. Energy efficiency is only slightly reduced in such cases, as airflow into and out of the compartment between panes is minimal, but the aesthetic problem will only get worse. Chances are you can replace just the sash, which might cost about half of what a new window ...


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You probably want to start with tanking tape, and use caulk for the final seal. https://youtu.be/IwR-vS4xc9g?t=9m15s



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