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I would say that you'll be okay with a 4" screws and a shims through the top shelf. 3 sets one on each end and a set in the middle should prevent your shelf from falling over. The top is where you'll get the most pulling force so if you screw the shelf up there you'll end up stopping it before it gains any gravitational force as it falls. Lag bolts will ...


1

I'd go two screws per wall stud thru the top and middle shelf. The weight of the thing is supported by the structure itself so all you need to do is keep it from falling over. Use a 4 1/2 inch timber tech or a 5/16 lag with a washer and you'll have two inches of screw into the stud which is adequate but a minimum. Make sure you install shims or a spacer to ...


1

Being Brass, the anchor is nice and easy to drill, Just get a Steel drill and slowly drill into the remaining anchor. once you have drilled through 90% of the brass, take a long nose pliers and "implode" the rest of the material into itself.


2

A slide hammer would be the most likely to work in that case. Drill a hole in the broken part, screw in the tip of a slide hammer, hammer it up and out. Using a penetrating lubricant and a screw extractor to get the broken threaded part (only) out would be an alternate approach. Be sure to apply anti-seize to the threads of all the ones that still work, ...


4

It might be important to add a photo of a plug, so us Yanks can understand what you're talking about. Based on the image it's clear to see that the terminal screws have no heads, so it's much different from most screw terminals a US user would come across. Terminals like this; even in the US, are designed to clamp a straight bit of wire. With a terminal ...


0

Screwing the conductor into the terminal in the plug gives a much more secure and resilient connection. A longer wire wrapped round has the potential to work loose (then you could get arcing or even no connection) and also to potentially contact a different terminal. If the earth wire were to find a connection to the live terminal, you could end up with a ...


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I just tryed putting the screw back in and pulling it and out it poped the. All I had to do was fill in the holes


1

How big an area? If it is small, can you replace the studs with pine? Cut the old out with a Sawzall. You could also use drywall adhesive.


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If you're not snapping the heads off (torque), your drill just doesn't cut it. If you're stripping the heads, you're not pushing hard enough (under powered drills require more pressure to avoid this and also lose torque towards the end, helping you snap the heads off). If the drywall pops, use two or more screws 2-3" apart, slowly sinking each one to ...


1

I suspect the studs are really hard old-growth wood Lubricating screws can really help when driving them into wood. I've seen various lubricants suggested. For exterior projects I've used LM grease and petroleum jelly (vaseline) but I'm not sure if there are any problems using either in your situation. The other common solution is to drill pilot holes ...



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