New answers tagged

1

That's a common failure mode for those lamps; the threads are fairly shallow and prone to stripping out. Though if it happens immediately, rather than after a few years of use, I would definitely return it for refund and/or replacement. If it fails after the warranty has expired: It is possible to kluge the connection by wrapping the threat in teflon ...


0

I used the plastic wall plugs you'd normally use for brick or concrete walls, it worked perfectly, you need quite a small size so it fits into the existing hole, tap them in lightly with a hammer then screw hinge back on, they expand so should keep the hole plugged securely, You could put a drop of glue in the hole first, but I thought about that afterwards ...


0

That's basically a #2 PSD2-2 drive. It's designed for relatively high torque driving that would make a normal Phillips drive cam out while minimizing the chance of stripping that you'd have with a square drive. Wild (and cynical) speculation, but I'm guessing the manufacturer calls it "Unidrive" because Phillips holds a patent on it. I'd get a #2 PSD2-2 ...


0

A #2 Philips or #2 Robertson (square drive) will do the job. Source: Spax faq #2: Q) What does Unidrive mean? A) Unidrive is a( Phillips/Square combo) drive system for the SPAX fastener. The user has the option of either using a Phillips drive bit or a square drive bit to install the SPAX fastener. http://www.spax.us/faqs.html


0

If I understand the issue correctly, you could insert a shim (the 'paper' end of a matchbook match works for me) into the hole, then screw in the screw. This will work similar to filling the hole with glue or using a larger diameter screw but in a less destructive measure.


0

A small tub of filler from a local DIY chain could do the trick - put the filler in the hole and then push the plug back in.


0

Glue by itself is rarely the right answer when a screw isn't holding. It sounds like you've stripped out the threads in the anchor. As others have said, switching to a thicker screw would solve that, by cutting new threads. A longer screw MIGHT reach an undamaged part of the anchor but is a less reliable solution. (The other classic solution is to ...


3

It sounds like a longer screw of the same diameter would solve your problem. If that doesn't work try a slightly larger diameter screw. You can help stop this problem from happening again by adding a spacer between the hook and the wall. The spacer can be of any material. It should look like a thick washer. The thickness should be whatever is now the ...


1

Might not be the answer you're looking for, but (as was the answer to that other question) you could pull it out and get a new plug. You might not need to redrill if you're careful or get a plug that'll hook into whatever hole is left. Also, I know it could just be preference, but have you tried Gorilla Glue?


0

Isn't the answer obvious? Look a nail and at a screw. The shank of nail is smooth, assuming regular nails. So, the only thing keeping them secure is the pressure of the material (typically wood) round the shank when installed. Now, look at a screw. The shank has a spiral groove that OBVIOUSLY yields much more resistance to being pulled out of the wood it ...


4

Any coating of grease or other rust inhibitor will wear off over time. The right approach is to use fasteners that are corrosion resistent either due to their material (such as stainless or brass), or are plated (with zinc, chrome, or other durable material).


0

Plain old petroleum jelly (Vaseline). It has so many uses around the house, from inhibiting rust to polishing shoes to removing eye makeup, that it belongs in your tool box next to the duct tape and W-D 40. ;)


1

I like these screw remover bits from sears They have saved me a ton of trouble and are not very expensive.


3

Using a thin cutoff disk in a rotary tool (Dremel), cut a slot in each screw that fits a medium-sized flat-blade screwdriver.


-2

Finally! after much swearing and screaming it worked! This did it for me! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtUEHMjkl4w


0

I am happy to report back that after 1 hour (part of it is because I am a newbie), I was able to remove these 8 nails. Tools used: flat head screwdriver, hammer and a 9-inch pry bar. The wall cans are only 14 inches wide. Hammer and screwdriver to create the gap and pry bar goes in to finish the job (only figured that out after I was done with 3 nails).


0

Sounds like Sebo? The M4 diameter relates to the diameter of the thread not the head though. A M4 thread will typically have a 7mm wide head. Googling "Sebo M 4 x 10K" seems to find a few references to that screw size.


0

Drill a small hole and use a nail to find out how much wood behind the metal. If little wood, do not use wood screws, or you will strip the metal or the screws. I would drill the holes slightly smaller than the diameter of the metal screws (finer thread) you will use. Then get an extra set of metal screws and file the tip a little into a taper. Use your ...


1

Looks like that wall can is attached with nails instead of screws. A pry bar will be your best bet to remove it. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions.


3

It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...



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