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I finally got the screws out, and as you can see by the picture The lockset is largely intact. The key was to prevent the offset screwdriver from slipping. As suggested, in one of the screws I had to cut an "X" and use a flat-head driver, but the other I was able to use as is. Ultimately I had to apply a lot of pressure to prevent the driver from ...


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Use a reciprocating saw to remove the knob. Use it as a therapeutic session to vent your frustration. If you spend 6 hours and a couple of band-aids to save yourself from buying a new $25 door knob, you're behind a lot more than $25. (Time is money). At some point you just have to bite the bullet and purchase new things and trash the old things. Not every ...


3

I'd drill the existing screw head off, use a bit slightly larger than the shaft of the screw but smaller than the hole in the knob. The stripped out screw should keep the bit fairly centered even when used at a slight angle. Once each head is removed you can pull the knob and try a screw extractor on what's left, but there's a good chance you'll need to ...


2

What you should have done, and should start by doing, is check whether this lockset will let you remove the inner knob. Cheaper ones often won't, but more expensive ones will have the same kind of release as on the outer knob -- rotate the thumbturn to the unlocked position, depress the rectangular catch below the knob shaft's surface, and pull the knob off. ...


4

Is this screw part of a furniture assembly? What you describe sounded like a cam-lock nut, like can be seen here: http://www.swedishfurnitureparts.com/products/ikea-cam-lock-nut-103433 If that's it, then it won't actually retract, you just align it so the adjacent part can be removed. There should be a dot or indicator showing you which way it needs to be ...



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