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If a tiny bit of the screw is still above the surface it's in, I always use an electric screwdriver to grab hold of the screw, and unscrew it. That is, mount the electric screwdriver on the screw the same way you would mount it on a normal drill - then simply reverse to remove the screw. Much simpler than using vise-grips, pliers, and other things to grab ...


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Typically you would need to drill a pilot hole and then thread with a thread cutting tool such as this: however, since you are only using 2mm aluminium it should be soft enough for you to cut your own thread. Note: this will never be as clean as using the proper threading tool: your problem is that you used a self tapping screw, I would recommend that you ...


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You should use a thread tapping die to meet the threading of your screws. Pre drill to the appropriate size, apply threading oil to the die, then slowly tap the hole. This isn't very complex, just requires a special tool.


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At 6 pounds, a simple picture hook will do. Any box store or hardware store will have them and they will list their load rating on them. Working from memory, I think the smallest size has a 10 pound rating.


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Spent ages on these as the plastic slot plug doesn't just pop out with the screw driver. Here's what works! Turn with a screw driver the plastic plug left or right until you feel it's loose (it's not screwed in but it's like a safe lock.. 270 degrees of it blocks the screw it's hidding to make it tight. the remaining 90 degrees when lined up with the screw ...


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Best case is you've probably hit a concrete structural wall. In that case use a hammer drill and cement screws or anchors if you really need more support than you get from the 1.5" in front of it. Worst case is you're hitting a conduit or water pipe, in which case thank goodness you haven't managed to puncture it. I'd look for a work box or some access ...



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