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2

As Joe points out, if this wall is original, then it's not drywall, but plaster. You can't easily detect studs behind plaster walls with a stud detector. You likely have to use test holes. One option is to drill a largish hole in the center(ish) of where you will mount the TV. Then use a coat hanger to fish it into the hole to see if you can locate the studs ...


2

An over-100-year-old apartment building is likely plaster-over-lath. In that case, you should be able to drill through the plaster and into the lath to sink wood screws. If this is so, you'll see what looks like sawdust on the tip of the drill when you pull it out. I'd probably use a bunch more than just the 4 recommended, but it'll hold a TV under 50 lbs....


1

There are two primary types of anchors for concrete. I'd trust either if properly installed. Holes must be drilled cleanly and to the proper size. Bolts must be of the correct diameter and length. Both require fairly large holes (7/16" to 5/8" or so). Sleeve or Wedge Anchor (with integrated bolt) Lag Shield (with standard lag screw)


3

I think a bigger issue than paint sealing moisture out of the screws is whether or not the screws in question are made of a material compatible with your deck framing. Pressure treated lumber (which your deck is hopefully constructed with) has a tendency to corrode just about anything you put in it, unless the fasteners are stainless steel, or have a ...


3

Generally speaking you can use the same tools you'd use for wood to work with aluminum. I've done a number of projects using aluminum bar and angle stock with my woodworking tools, including a miter saw. However, since the metal is much harder, you'd probably have an easier time doing the drilling and countersinking separately. I'd drill with a standard ...



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