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1

You might find this table useful as well... Disclaimer: I wrote the table after more than 30 years in trade (builder/carpenter).


0

Those are sheet metal screws. They never fit very well and it is easy to strip the socket. Phillips head will usually do better than a slotted head as long as the screwdriver is a tight fit. You cannot normally get a hex-type head on a sheet metal screw, especially one that small.


2

That diameter would be very close to a M2.5 at 1.993mm minor screw. A hex head cap screw (AKA Allen head) could replace the Phillips. Its also a bit smaller than an ANSI #4-40 at .0805inch minor You could try the approximate size and get the matching tap for the closest interference fit.


2

What generally works for me - when just pulling them out with my hands doesn't - is to insert a screw, rotate it a few times so it gets some grip on the anchor and then pull both of them out. A screwdriver will work, too, I think, though, you'll want to apply some pressure to one side and either pull or pop it out that way. If they're really stuck.. then I ...


4

If the wall is standard drywall, I would use a punch, wooden dowel or something similar and push them in. By design they are resistant to pulling out with out some wall damage. They just need to be slightly below the surface. Repairing the holes will depend on the wall finish. If it is painted then spackle as @Craig suggested, and repaint. If it has ...


0

9 times out of 10 you can get it out with a screwdriver that EXACTLY fits the slot. The problem with the average screwdriver is that it has a BEVELED tip. I have no idea what idiot thought that up, but it belongs in the same category as knives that are not sharp. If you ask a knife company why their knives are not sharp, they will answer: "We are in the ...


1

The easiest way I've found to remove screws which you just cannot get purchase on with a screwdriver is to make the slot bigger. This can be accomplished with Dremel type rotary tool with a slim cutting disk. This is made easier if the head of the screw is above the working surface such as in the picture you showed. All you are trying to do is recreate the ...


0

Brass Screws, what can you do... Well these screw heads are not the typical Phillips head, which introduces the tapered slot, you are probably using a Phillips head, and the contact points are not great. I normally find that switching to a small flat screwdriver works better in this case. you could maybe try that. Essentially, getting screws out ...


0

I finally figured it out. I used a Fein MultiMaster to cut the screws down to the sheet metal. One of them helpfully fell out after that. For the other I tried a nail punch but it was stuck too well. So I used a crowbar between the outside of the box and the vent it was attached to. That did it. Thanks for all the answers.


0

The easiest way to do something like this is with a diamond hole saw, 1/4" maybe. Sheet metal screws are da ebil. Do not attempt to negotiate with them.


0

this would probably have been easier if you hadn't hack-sawed off the exposed threaded ends….:D Now that that's done, I expect your best bet is to try to 'tap' them w/ a screw-removal bit. They're reverse-threaded drill bits made for drilling into the shaft of broken-off screws. The challenge will being able to push hard enough against the screw to get it ...


2

If there's enough sticking out that you can grab on to, a pair of locking pliers would likely help turn it but it will be hard to fully unthread since there will come a point where the pliers don't have enough to grip on to. If you're lucky, you might get enough clearance to cut it or turn it from another part of the screw. Another option is to simply ...


0

You could try grasping the screw's threaded end with a pair of pliers and rotating. If there's not enough friction, you could try sandwiching the screw between a piece of scrap rubber or something similarly tacky or sticky.


0

I would suggest fastening a piece of wood horizontally across at the top, and then fastening your shelter to that. Using the appropriate fastenings (for either wood or masonry) to fasten the wood to the house. This would only leave two or three holes that need to be patched if your pergola/lean to was removed. Don't chisel any stones off the wall. It ...


1

It's a coat hook - it doesn't hold that much weight, and all the force is shear force, not pulling force. So pretty much anything will work. Simple plastic anchors with screws will work just fine. (Never heard of rawl plugs but google says that that's the same thing as a plastic anchor.) Masonry screws are a real pain to use if you are not a pro. I would ...


4

You'll need a masonry bit and hammer drill to get a hole in brick. However it may be easier to screw the hooks to a piece of wood and mount the wood to the wall. With a nice routed edge on the wood that can look really nice. To mount the wood you can use normal masonry anchors.


2

If these are only for coats I would glue them up with construction adhesive or silicone.


1

If those screws are only 1" long, then that security latch doesn't give you much security. In order to provide any semblance of security, the screws need to be firmly attached to a stud. It looks like those screws only go into the door jamb, which is probably only 3/4 thick and unable to handle a 3 1/2" screw. If your screws do not have an unthreaded ...


2

Reminder: If you want that to provide any real security against kick-in, the "bolt" (I'd call it a hasp, but never mind) needs to be firmly secured not just to the door trim but into the stud behind it. 3" screws are seriously worth considering. In any case, the screws you use for this should have thread stopping a bit before the screw head (with the ...


0

I used a generous amount of WD-40 and a pair of flat-nose vice grip pliers. Mission accomplished.


1

According to a recent issue of Fine Woodworking, impact drivers are magnificent for driving screws into wood -- the bit rarely "cams out" of the screw, and the screw "just seems to melt into the wood". The major downside of impact drivers is that they are much noisier than an ordinary drill or driver; hearing protection is highly recommended and your ...


-1

I do have some experience drilling screws as that's about all I use for fasteners; I don't use nails. You don't need torque adjusters, speed dials and all that other mumbo-jumbo. I do use a magnetic bit holder if I'm one-handing it. Before I discovered this, I used to strip heads and wreck bits, but now I use the same bit for a long time and don't think ...



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