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60

Screws are a "superior" fastener over a nail (they have far superior tensile strength) - especially if you're talking about screwing down decking. However there are many scenarios where a nail is the proper fastener for the application (attaching joists is one example - screws are brittle and will fail when subjected to the forces of a shear loaded ...


49

There is absolutely no reason to use nails in this day and age. I urge you to use 1 5/8" drywall screws. There are several reasons. Screws have much better holding power, they are actually faster to install, and they can be slightly counter sunk during installation to make mudding a lot easier ( especially with a drywall screw gun or a decent drywall bit ...


43

Damaged screws are extracted by drilling into the screw with a drill bit, then using a special screw extractor bit that is tapered and has threads which turn opposite to those of the screw. The extraction process should be done slowly and carefully because the extraction process is more fragile than the normal insertion of a screw. I found this to be a ...


43

"6" is a #6-size screw. Screw gauges are a measure of the head size and shaft size, and are roughly linear but not quite a 1:1 relationship (a #8 screw is a little less than twice the diameter of a #4 screw). There isn't a good system for converting gauge to a calibrated measurement, so you're best off consulting a table like this: ...


34

You may be able to cut a notch in the screw head using a hacksaw (or similar cutting tool), then use a slotted screwdriver to remove it.


30

I'm not an authority, but start with this: Keep the bit inline with the screw's direction of penetration. Most times I see newbies struggle with that. If the drill/chuck is cocked in relation to the axis of the screw, it creates all kinds of trouble. Firmly push inward, not letting the bit slip back out of the screwhead. Bits are consumable. They don't ...


27

A few suggestions: Are you using a wood glue such as Elmer's to hold the toothpicks in place? The top hinge on my front door used to pull loose; I repaired it with toothpicks and wood glue (pretty much filling the screw hole) and haven't had any problems in several years. How long were the original screws, and what did you replace them with? When I ...


26

Nails are considered an "elastic connection". They handle wood movement much better than screws. Many times if you have severe wood movement with nails you will see things like nails that tilt or seem to back out. This is actually a good thing. Many times if a screw had been used in that case it would have caused the wood to split as it moved.


26

Shamelessly ripped off from here, looks like the primary reason why we still have "bad" screws (flat head and Phillips) is that the "better" types of screws are simply more difficult/expensive to manufacture: The reason for the different styles is cost and torque. The slotted head screws are cheap and easy to make. But they're completely ...


26

There is also a kit called a Pro-Grabbit that is made for stripped out or broken screws. I've used it before, using a portable drill with one tip to drill it out and fip the bit and it will extract the screw. It has worked for me on the couple times I've needed it and suggested for work when there is a need. This is the Pro Grabbit. Here are the ...


24

Twist in the proper direction Are you turning the right way? Remember, "Righty tighty, Lefty loosy" (which never made sense to me). Most screws are right-handed threads, so you'll turn them anti(counter)-clockwise to remove them. In some situations left-hand thread screws are used (usually to prevent screws from loosening due to rotational forces), so ...


22

You can use a ratchet handle with a screwdriver bit attachment, like this:


20

For tight spots, they make Offset Screwdrivers. They're manufactured by many different companies, with many different drive variations.


19

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


17

There are several approaches to hanging loads on drywall/plasterboard. Light Duty - The most common anchors for used for light loads are expanding tubes that grip the sides of the hole they are in and flare lightly behind the hole Others like yours, have a wide thread to grab more surface in the drywall itself. Some of the these threaded anchors have a ...


16

It is possible that there are several reasons for the screw head destruction. You may be using an electrical tool that is not at all suitable for driving screws. Some tools designed for drilling holes are not going to offer enough torque at a low enough speed to properly drive screws. If your tool starts out with a huge burst of speed it can almost ...


15

It's always better to attach it to studs - which should certainly be possible with something that big. That said though, you might be surprised how much a drywall anchor can hold. How well they work depends on the load though. They will work best with a static downward load - a fixed weight close to the wall pulling directly downward. They will work ...


15

My intuition is that the quarter inch of steeply pitched fluting is designed to ream out the passage in the outer member being joined, or at least ream out the outer 3/4" of 'hole'. Conceivably, this might reduce friction when driving in the screw over the final 3/4" ... or it could be a gimmick. . EDIT 2013-05-11: Here is a related patent ...


14

The paper is a key part of the drywall structure. Just as when you cut the paper on the drywall it's easy to snap, when you screw past the paper it's easy to blow out the back. Plaster and paper are a lot like concrete and rebar, the plaster based core of drywall resists compression, while the paper resists tension. It's not essential to pull the old ...


14

Here's another type of adjustable box that you can use. Just mount the box approximately where you want it and after you find the correct depth you can move it, even after drywall has been installed. Here's the cut sheet on it. Here.


14

Flat-head / slotted screws come in many sizes. Having a correctly-fitting bit helps a lot. Too narrow or too thin and you'll damage the head. Too wide and you'll damage the work. Too thick and it won't fit. Fingernails, coins, and knives are non-optimal. Make sure your bit is properly aligned in the the slot. Keep the drill directly in line with the screw. ...


12

They are not actually zinc, but zinc-coated steel, also known as galvanized steel. The treated-wood industry recommends the use of hot-dip galvanized or stainless steel fasteners for use with treated wood. Electroplated/electro-galvanized and mechanically-galvanized coatings should not be considered to be hot-dip galvanized. (Class 55, or higher, ...


12

A If you choose B you will dimple the steel, ruining the look while creating a penetration point for water because expansion and contraction of the metal due to heating and cooling will create an open access point for water to enter, and a big opening behind it to receive it. A, however, will give you a tight seal against the wood, wood-steel-screw in a ...


11

There are several kinds of drywall anchors and they each have their own weight rating. Some work by drilling a small hole and tapping in a plastic sleeve and others work by drilling a bigger hole and screwing a plastic sleeve and there are others where you drill a hole and the metal butterfly expands behind the drywall know as molly bolts (thanks comments!). ...


11

First, I really like Eric's answer for practical reasons. But there is another side to screw head diversity: Security. In the end, it's usually a temporary measure. Once a company invents a new screw, some third party will start selling tools to remove them. But for a time, any new screw design means the only people who can open your parts are ...


11

Before you put a lot of work into removing the screw, you should try placing an elastic band between the screwdriver and the screw. Often when the screw isn't completely stripped this method works fairly well.



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