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28

Twist in the proper direction Are you turning the right way? Remember, "Righty tighty, Lefty loosy" (which never made sense to me). Most screws are right-handed threads, so you'll turn them anti(counter)-clockwise to remove them. In some situations left-hand thread screws are used (usually to prevent screws from loosening due to rotational forces), so ...


19

If you can use a drill with a screwdriver bit to drive a screw, then most of the time, use it. Here's when you might be smarter to use a screwdriver: The screw is going into a pre-tapped (threaded) hole in metal, or plastic, or any soft material. Always at least start such screws by hand -- so that you can avoid cross-threading them. Putting screws into ...


16

It is possible that there are several reasons for the screw head destruction. You may be using an electrical tool that is not at all suitable for driving screws. Some tools designed for drilling holes are not going to offer enough torque at a low enough speed to properly drive screws. If your tool starts out with a huge burst of speed it can almost ...


14

You may have some luck with a screw extractor. They come in various styles - here are two of them: The extractors are designed to screw themselves down into the head of the screw while at the same time applying torque on the screw in the direction that would loosen the screw. Your described screw had a hex socket type hole so the extractor may be ready ...


7

Abrasive paste as sold in car repair shops to use when grinding in valves in cylinder heads is great for screw heads that are 'worn'. Place a small dab on the screwdriver head before trying to unscrew the item. The friction from the abrasive in the paste will help the screwdriver 'grab' the worn screw slot..


7

I usually just cut a slot in the screw head with a Dremel or similar rotary cuttter, and then use a regular screwdriver to unscrew.


7

If the head is readily accessible you can use a fine toothed metal saw to cut a groove with which you then can use a regular flat screwdriver to unscrew.


6

Is this an impact driver ? If not, Lower the torque setting on the drill. Use the correct sized bit for the screw. For Phillips head screws there are several sizes. If you are using a posi-drive screw, use a posi-drive bit. Sometimes you can use a square drive bit with posi-drive, but using a phillips bit will generally cause the bits to cam out. Try ...


5

If its metal on metal you can try heating the area or cooling it with ice. Metal expands and contracts with temperature change (works great on spark plugs too!). For screw heads starting to strip, a piece of bicycle inner tube or rubberband between the head and driver bit helps it from stripping further.


5

Screwdriver bits are generally considered consumable. Regardless of the brand, they eventually break/wear out. Hardware stores sell them in packs of 5-10 for exactly that reason. I wouldn't put too much stock in what kind of tool the bit originally came with. The only exception is if you're using an impact driver you might want to be a little more picky. ...


4

Screws are sometimes "locked" using a type of "glue" to keep them from coming loose, especially in settings where there is vibration (such as spinning disks). There are different levels of this locking material, some that are meant to be loosened and some that are intended to be permanent. If this is what is holding your screws in, it is highly likely to be ...


4

Stripping a screw is indeed a terrible thing to do. It is best to avoid the problem of stripped screws by not stripping them in the first place, but you should also be prepared to deal with a stripped or rusted screw in the event that you have to deal with one. Your first step should be to look at the screw's head and find several screws that you might ...


4

00 refers to the size and angle of the tip. It doesn't say how thick the tip becomes before merging into the shaft. So, yes, these could both be 00 sized, if they fit the same screws; the thicker one just (a) will fit larger 00 screws better than the small one would and (b) won't fit into as small an opening.


3

Those are external line head screws, and are used as anti-tamper screws in some Japanese electronics. You can probably find a driver for them from a game console hack supplier (they're used on Gamecube, Wii, and some other game consoles). The driver looks like this (sorry for the horrible pic): They also come in 5 and 7 point varieties (hard to tell how ...


3

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


3

For screws that held the original hinge in an old wood door, and would not budge, even with the advice above, I aimed a hair dryer at the screw for a few minutes (thinking that perhaps the wood was damp and that was holding the screw in; could also have been something about heat since I often run hot water over stuck screw tops). Anyway, it worked, with only ...


3

For really stuck screws, you can use a manual impact driver. Attach a bit that fits snugly in the screw slot Set the driver to spin in the proper direction (this process varies from tool to tool, but most commonly, you'll compress the driver and twist). Place the driver on the screw, and hold the driver as straight as possible (keep you hands away from ...


3

The drivers on the left are for really small electronics or things like jewelry. For your project, try the smallest Phillips bit in the green handle. Make sure it fits snug in the screw head (if it's loose or doesn't fit, you'll strip the screw head; try the next size up or down).


3

It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...


3

Is this the first time you've used an impact driver? They sound and feel very different. The clicking / banging you hear is not the clutch, it is the hammer mechanism striking inside the tool. (Does your impact driver even have an adjustable clutch? It is not common on impact tools.)


2

There are several types of screw heads that look like Phillips screws but aren't quite the same--Reed & Prince, JIS, Pozidrive, etc. The JIS screw head is likely to be found in electronic equipment. List of Screw Drives


2

You could try the Screw Removal Pliers GT (Neji-Saurus), by Engineer Inc.. I'd like to buy a set myself.


2

I have just finished renovating an outdoor furniture set. This involved removing and replacing about 180 wood screws. The things I found that worked best are: Clean around the screw head as much as possible, to free it up from anything around it. Wood screws can become embedded, and the wood covering them hardens over the years, especially if ...


2

In researching your question I came across several jeweller sites that claim that with proper technique you should be able to remove the screws without damage. However I found this unsatisfactory, so I dug deeper, and the answer is yes, there exists nylon bladed screw drivers


2

Black & Decker GYRO might be worth a look http://www.blackanddecker.com/power-tools/BDCS40G.aspx


2

The DMV don't expect their license plates back in pristine condition, they usually get them back beat up as hell, so just pry them off with a screwdriver. If the edges of the plates are bent out of shape they will not care as they're going into the junk pile anyway.


2

It's known as a Spanner Screw. It sometimes is slots, other times two small holes.


2

I think the bits as basically very low quality. When you go to your favorite store, simply buy one of the contractor grade of bits like DeWalt, Kolbalt, Irwin, Vermont American etc. Be careful what kind of jobs you tackle with your light duty screwdriver. I'm sure it does not have the power to drive longer screws into hard woods like decking etc. You have to ...


2

If it's a screw, a couple of ideas: You can use a dremel to cut a slot in the screw head and then use a normal screwdriver on it. Get an old toothbrush. Head up the handle with a lighter or a heat gun. When it gets hot, press it over the screw head. Hold it until it cools. That gives you a custom screwdriver. Press hard when you use it.



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