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32

Yes, you might want the highest precision possible - for example when you build furniture which benefits greatly from precise cuts. The most convenient way would be to draw the line that will signify the edge of the piece you want cut so that the blade cuts the line and whatever material is on the far side of the raw board. Something like this: |the detail ...


22

I wouldn't worry so much about blades flying out, even when using a cheap harbor freight saw. What is more likely to happen is the motor will burn out quicker than a quality tool. I've bought many harbor freight tools for "time to time" use. I've got a drill press that's lasted quite a long while ... granted I only use it a few times a year so I got my ...


16

You're looking for a precision cut, with a non-precision tool. It's better to cut the piece slightly larger than what you need, and sand/plane to the final dimensions. This will allow you to compensate for blade wiggle, blade bevel, human error, chip out, etc. The old adage should go Measure twice, cut once, sand to fit.


15

You should replace your blade when its dull. Ways to tell its dull: it starts binding it tears/chips the substance more than usual it burns the wood just a pain to use = a sharp blade should let you push the saw forward with minimum effort. If you find yourself forcing the saw forward (not ideal from a safety perspective), change the blade.


15

I would mark the line at 350mm and cut with the edge of the saw against the line, away from the edge you measured from. That way you're not trying to keep the middle of the blade on that line, you just keep the edge on the line, and you don't need to know the width of your saws. With a circular saw the leading edge of the cut from directly above is obscured ...


15

It has to do with how far back the blade goes on the down (non cutting) stroke. It's usually called the "Pendulum Stroke adjustment." The idea being that it will move the blade back, out of the way of the material on the down stroke. It reduces the load on the saw when cutting thick materials, at the cost of a bit more splintering. Use a setting of 0 ...


12

There's a GREAT article here. I'd highly recommend checking it out. Here's a brief excerpt (ALL CREDIT GOES TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR!): Nickle Cadmium (NiCd) Pros: NiCd batteries are more difficult to damage from heat and impact. NiCd batteries have a longer cycle life of about 1,000 charges. They put out strong current flow. They are less easily damaged ...


11

If this is a one-off project it may be worth asking the ply merchant if they can do the cutting for you, which might work out even cheaper than a cheap saw. Other than that, I suspect that if you do buy a saw you will end up using it more than you thought you would and should give consideration to buying the dearer one, which in all likelihood will last you ...


10

The difference between a 10" 60T and 80T saw blade is only slightly noticeable. In practice, chip out with either isn't a huge concern, provided you go slow. An 80T blade is naturally going to slow you down more, so that may be useful if your tendency is to yank the radial arm down and go. Another consideration is the end grain of the piece, some trees ...


10

A heap isn't very descriptive as per quantity, so I am going to assume that this is akin to a buttload. A chainsaw really is your best option as they are designed for quick, rough cuts. Also, the blades last for a very long time. A large reciprocating saw will also do the job just fine but will take longer and go through some blades. Also, the vibration ...


9

If it's a hand tool not designed to be mounted in that manner, I would advise against doing this as it has the potential to be dangerous. Think about what would happen if the tool were to become dislodged or the blade break off. In the event of an emergency, how would you quickly shut it off? Saws like table saws and band saws should have an easily ...


9

The factory edge on a fresh sheet of plywood is very straight. So use that. Option 0: Snap a chalk line and cut by hand. Fine if you're doing sheathing, but not accurate enough for many other tasks. Option 1: Use 2 sheets of plywood. Stack one on the other, offset by ~32". Use the top one as a guide to cut the bottom one. Option 2: Make an 8' ripping ...


8

I always take saw blade thickness (and pencil mark thickness, for that matter) out of the equation entirely by thinking of each as having a single reference edge. The blade, in this mental model, doesn't "take out" a blade width, it cuts an edge and leaves "slop" on the other side (doesn't matter if the blade is 1/16" wide or, in theory, 3/4" wide... what's ...


8

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


7

I'd use the 24 tooth blade, but be sure it is a carbide type and sharp. Since all your cuts are end cuts and will be covered with baseboard trim, so getting an ultra smooth cut is not that important. Obviously, you don't want to see any large chips on the cut edge, so do your cuts slowly and smoothly. Save your 48 blade for visible finish cuts on softer ...


6

Could you do it... Yes. There are a few problems with this setup. First, if the saw does not have a locking trigger how will you turn it on when you are cutting? If it does have a locking trigger, you'll want a way to turn the tool on/off quickly and easily. This could be achieved by connecting the saw to a power strip, and mounting the strip in an easily ...


6

I don't have any experience with NiMH batteries, but I can say for sure that Li-ion beats NiCd hands down. Especially for homeowner use, where the battery may sit for days or weeks off the charger, their lack of self-discharge is a key feature. There's nothing more frustrating than needing your cordless tool only to find the battery's dead. The lighter ...


5

Looks for worn or chipped carbide teeth. If the teeth are merely coated in pitch, you can remove it with oven cleaner (or in a pinch windex), and old tooth brush, and some elbow grease. Blades should be replaced when they get dull or after you hit a screw or a hard knot.Cleaning saw blades


5

I learned a lot from watching "This Old House", back in the day when the home owners did a lot more of the work (now get off of my lawn). I also learned a lot by watching the "New Yankee Workshop". However I didn't watch these to learn anything specific, I just watched them because I enjoyed them. I'm not certain how they might suit your needs.


5

It's been a while since I've been to job sites, but a few years ago the tool of choice was a Milwaukee Worm Drive circular saw. Things might have changed with well known brands switching to plastic gears, but the torque on these doesn't get much better. They are also well known for having less kick-back problems. My opinion is to stay away from ...


5

I've used the single wheel version of this before, and it works fine. Pros: Simple design. Just like using a utility knife to score a line, you cut your circle out on both sides, and then punch out the hole. Perfectly round holes. Cons: Slower. To make the cuts at the same place, you drill a small hole in the center and then align the cutout tool on ...


4

As far as brands go, I trust DeWalt, Milwaukee, and Skil. There are probably more, but those are the ones I've had experience with. Are you going for a cordless saw, that can be more portable, and good for the occasional plywood cutting project, or a corded one? Usually the corded ones have more power, and a higher duty cycle.


4

For cutting porcelain or ceramic tile, standard practice is to use: A wet saw with a diamond blade A manual tile cutter (a carbide wheel slides along a rail to score the tile, then you snap on the line. Tile nippers for complex shapes You can use a diamond blade with a hacksaw to cut holes, but it won't be very efficient. If you have mostly straight ...


4

You could probably rent a saw like this from your local hardware store. They will usually have a diamond tipped masonry blade. You'll also want to make sure it's a wet saw or you keep the stones wet as you cut, as the dust from cutting concrete can make a real mess and be harmful to your health. You may also be able to find a splitter like this. The ...


4

For such little use, you might want to consider getting a cordless circular saw. If you don't already own a cordless drill (which is a must have), then you can buy a kit for less the the cost of the DeWalt that comes with a cordless drill, circular saw, and a few other pieces. I bought a cheap Ryobi kit at Home depot for $69 for a gift and it works great ...


3

I bought a cheap circular saw and had terrible trouble making 45 degree cuts on old hardwood, with the blade binding and smoking and blackening the wood. It went OK with 90 degree cuts, but I guess that when rotated the blade was not properly aligned. I replaced it with a Makita ($140) and it works beautifully. I wish I had done it sooner. I have cheap ...


3

I watched the vid on Utube, very interesting. I don't use a slide chop saw for 2X4's (I use a 12" fixed) but that technique looks good to me. I think the reason is that taking two shallow passes is just as fast and doesn't load down the saw as much as a single pass. Since the angle of contact using a slide saw is much different than a fixed I can see why the ...


3

From a "size - only" standpoint two critical dimensions of a bandsaw are the throat capacity and the maximum cutting height. Throat capacity is the size of the opening between the blade and the frame. You need your workpiece to be able to fit through this opening as you push it through the blade. Max cutting height is the maximum amount of blade that ...


3

Sorry I am going to disagree somewhat with "shirlock homes" answer. Given the choice between a 24T & 48T saw blade to perform the task (cross-cutting oak floorboards), I would most definitely go with the 48T blade, you will get a much cleaner cut (& less tear-out on the underside). I would use the 24T blade on softwood (especially framing timber), ...



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