Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

To get a perfect finish sand with 120 grit then 180. Apply whatever stain,varnish, you wish leave till properly dry then final sand with Lubrisil 400 grit then smooth with a damp white spirit cloth.( Damp NOT WET) Re apply stain/varnish lubrisil again wipe with spirit cloth and leave to dry finally buff with a soft rag.


6

As @Nick2253 commented, sanding between coats promotes better adhesion of the next coat. This occurs because a rougher surface has more area and "features" for the next coat to grab onto. That's why it's easier to scrape paint off of a smooth surface like glass than a relatively rough one like wood. Sanding also helps remove any bumps from dust that's ...


3

Don't sand, that puts lead dust all over the place. Get some medium plastic and taped it to the wall and extend it out 6-12 feet to catch all the chips. Scrape it carefully so all the chips fall on the plastic. When done, roll up the plastic to trap the chips and dust, tape it closed, and dispose in the trash. (I don't like that step, but last I heard, ...


3

Wear a mask while sanding or scraping. Clean up with towels and a wet solvent. Don't eat the lead chips.


1

The answer is yes, but not as effectively as a purposefully designed tool. Take a look at buffing and sanding tools' RPM. It's significantly higher than that of a power drill: 8,000 - 15,000 for an air powered palm sander vs 300-1,500 RPM for a standard variable speed drill. Other aspects depend upon the modular design of the particular tool you're ...


0

Can you clarify what you mean by fixed speed powerdrill? There's hammer drills and then there's rotary hammers. Most hammer drills use chucks, much like any a regular drill (albiet they have an additional means to be tightened. Rotary hammers use SDS bits, differing slightly from one another based on the brand. You can use a chuck adapter for a rotary hammer ...


2

Silica becomes a hazard with long term exposure. Wear a mask, face shield and gloves while blasting. Clean up and you are fine afterwards. A small amount of exposure will not affect the vast majority of people. If you have asthma you might want to be a little more aggressive on the clean up.


0

Looks like a felt tip pen to me. Most inks are partially water soluble (good news) but they usually have acid in them (bad news). You can probably remove some of the ink by water or other solvent, but no matter what some of it will stay in the wood because it is acid-etched into the wood. So, basically you will have to sand deeply into the wood to eradicate ...


0

I find that lacquer thinner really removes a lot of different types of marks off wood. In your case, it will most likely remove the finish, since most commercial furniture finishes are lacquer based. Try a soft lint free rag dampened with lacquer thinner first to see if it removes any ink, AFTER you bring the footboard outside where there is lots of fresh ...


1

Before you go at this with trying to sand it.....I would try using paint and finish stripper. This will take off a huge percentage of the finish with a lot less work than sanding it off. The first part of the stripping can be done by scraping off the bubbled surface. The secondary applications of stripper can be done with steel wool. Do wear GOOD rubber ...


1

unlikely, since ball-point pen will also have dented the surface so the pen mark is lower that the rest of the wood stain. Paint-thinner will dissolve some pen-inks, but of course it'll also remove the finish on the wood. how about a covering? Pick some interesting fabric, a think layer of batting, and upholster it??


0

If the difference isn't very great, you could sand them down with a belt sander. This is probably best if your wall is a bit uneven and you need a very slight taper. Otherwise, you may want to use shims behind the thinner piece to make it flush at the surface. Then fill the edge of the slight void behind the beam or stile with caulk. A third solution would ...



Top 50 recent answers are included