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14

Read the instructions on the can. See what the manufacturer recommends. Sandpaper is fairly useless on polyurethane because the heat generated by the friction causes the polyurethane to melt and block up the grit. And the finer the grit, the faster it gets blocked up. I have been using polyurethane for more than 30 years. Here is my routine to achieve a ...


14

I use 220 grit. You sand polyurethane to (a) remove any dust bumps in the lower coat, and (b) cut the surface of the lower coat so that the upper coat has more surface area to bond to. You don't need the lower coat to be super-smooth because the upper coat will cover the roughness from sanding anyway. For application, I use a china bristle brush. I've ...


13

The short ends you pictured are the cross grains of the board. What I see is that you have used a too course sandpaper on these edges. This should be easy to fix. You need to step down the grit of the sand paper. any final sanding should be done with 220 or 320 paper. On these end details, use fine paper, break it's (paper's) back so it is flexible, and ...


13

A typical spindle sander rotates at between 100 and 2,000 RPM, where a router is much faster 8,000 to 35,000 RPM. So I would say this is probably not the best idea, and could lead to damage to the equipment, injury, and death.


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


11

Hand-plane before you sand. A good sharp plane and good technique produces a very nice finish. Only light sanding required after that. Don't plane after sanding, the leftover grit will dull your blade. Other than that, it's about elbow grease.


10

If you don't have a lot of material to remove, you could use a belt or palm sander to gently sand it down. Be very careful not to press too hard so you don't damage the wood, if you take your time it should work just fine. If you have to remove a bit more material you could use a circular saw, just make sure you get a saw blade with lots of teeth. For ...


10

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


9

When you say you can see the brush marks, do you mean that they're actually irregularly surfaced? I mean - are we talking just a visual effect or an actual difference in the depth of the paint? If the latter, do a skim coat with lightweight joint compound and when it dries, either lightly sand OR smooth with a large, slightly damp sponge, then apply ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


8

If you're talking about tools like this, then you can use them vertically. The manual for the tool I linked to doesn't have any mention of the words horizontal, vertical, level, flat or upright, so if they don't warn you not to, you can assume it's OK to do it. One thing to note is that to sand a vertical surface, you're going to have to hold the tool ...


7

A cheap and easy solution would be to strap an air filter to a box fan and run it in the room for awhile. I've seen several variations of the basic concept. Here is one example: Build a do-it-yourself air purifier for about $25


7

Release the paper-clamp latches. There will be one or two latches on both sides of the sander. For that model, they probably look like this (note the 2 red arrows, showing the release motion): Pull the folded-over edges, of the sandpaper, out from under the clamps. That model may use velcro paper, so expect that you might have to peel the sandpaper off ...


6

As 'cheap' is one of the requirements -- I'd probably go with a random orbit or even just a vibrating palm sander. You can get some decent models for $50-60. I would recommending one of the 1/4 sheet models, where you can use any sand paper that you cut down to size, rather than the fancy shapes that require you to specifically buy sand paper made for that ...


6

If you don't want to use electric tools, you could wrap sandpaper around a block of wood or a sponge and try to sand the top down so that it fits. If this is to be a permanent installation, you could also try to remove part of the ceiling. If it is drywall it will probably possible to cut with a razer knife. If it's plaster, you are probably better off ...


6

I really think a palm sander is the wrong tool for this job. Palm sanders are great for finishing with finer grits but lack the power to remove layers of paint quickly. The siding job you are starting would go a lot faster with a 5 or 6 inch dual action (DA) sander with prepunched velcro backed sandpaper disks. There are several nice ones for under $100 and ...


5

There's a fascinating article in Fine Homebuilding # 221, pg. 73, where they torture test various brands of sandpaper discs and find that there's a HUGE gap in performance between the stuff that you can buy at Lowe's (Gator) and the stuff you can find only at good woodworking/tool stores or online (Mirka and Klingspor). I've typically used Mirka when I can ...


5

Here's how I cut laminated particle board: Put heavy masking tape over the general area that you're going to cut. This will help (at least a little bit) to keep the laminate from chipping on the edges. Mark the final cut line right on the masking tape. Get a fine-toothed blade for whatever saw you prefer. For a circular saw, 60 or more teeth should work ...


5

You really want cheap? Get one of those rubber disks in a shaft that you can put into an electric drill and fit it with sandpaper, suitable disks of which are usually sold at the same place. It shouldn't cost more than a few dollars all up. Perhaps surprisingly, this is likely to cause less tear-out than things like belt or orbital sanders because it's ...


5

Belt sander to remove old finish, and all the dents and dings. Hand sander with medium grit paper, followed by light grit paper. Then the table should be ready for whatever finish you want to apply. I know most people don't have a workshop like Norm, but... If you have access to a large planer (and can remove the legs and what-not), you could run it ...


5

Sanding is best done after the floor is laid. This enables you to get a flat finish across all the boards which would be difficult if not impossible to achieve by sanding prior to installation. If you have any particularly rough boards then you might want to sand them first - but it's not essential. You should be able to hire a drum sander and an edge ...


5

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was ...


4

If you can scrape the wax off first (handscraper, etc..) I believe that will add some life to your belt.


4

If the holes are already patched and all your are doing is sanding it down to a smooth finish before you prime, it will be way less than 5 minutes per patch. Personally I would do it myself but how valuable your time is something only you can answer. If you get the sand paper made specifically for sanding joint compound (like this it will go really fast. ...


4

I'd give it a once-over with 180 or 220 grit. I've made the mistake of assuming surfaces were smooth enough to paint/stain and found rough spots while in the process of finishing. Nothing will make you want to kick yourself more than realizing that first coat of paint/stain you just applied needs to be sanded back off so you can properly prep the surface. ...


4

HEPA air purifiers are like low-pressure, high-volume shop vacs and are great for this. They average about $150 and you can find them at just about any large store. Very useful for clearing allergens and dust particles.


4

Orbit diameter is related to how aggressively the sander removes material; the larger the orbit, the quicker it removes material (all else held equal). This article on American Woodworker's site seems to agree. It also mentions that larger orbits leave more visible swirl marks. However, orbit size is not the only determining factor in how quickly material ...


4

Wet Sanding If you want a smooth surface, you could try wet sanding it. Purchase a drywall sanding sponge (~$4.00 at any home improvement store), and use that for the final sanding pass. Fill a bucket with water. Dunk the sponge in the water, and then wring it out to remove as much excess water as possible. Using a light circular motion, buff the ...


4

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...



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