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11

Hand-plane before you sand. A good sharp plane and good technique produces a very nice finish. Only light sanding required after that. Don't plane after sanding, the leftover grit will dull your blade. Other than that, it's about elbow grease.


9

An advantage of the disk over the belt is that you can control how aggressive the sanding is by moving the point of contact between the edge of the disk (where the speed is highest) and the middle (where it is lowest). The downside of the disk sander (pun intended) is you can only safely use the half of the disk that is pushing the work down onto the table. ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


7

Release the paper-clamp latches. There will be one or two latches on both sides of the sander. For that model, they probably look like this (note the 2 red arrows, showing the release motion): Pull the folded-over edges, of the sandpaper, out from under the clamps. That model may use velcro paper, so expect that you might have to peel the sandpaper off ...


6

First, a quick note on technique - start with a coarse grade sandpaper on the floor sander and work down to the the finer grade. The coarse grade removes the old finish and levels out the imperfections, then the fine grade makes it nice and smooth. If you go the other way around, you'll definitely curse every time you see the grooves in the sunlight. ...


6

It might be better if you didn't stain the wood. We have varnished the floors in nearly all the rooms in our circa 1900 house and in each case we used clear Ronseal Diamond Hard varnish - it's quick drying and "does what it says on the tin" * - and with three coats it still darkens the wood quite nicely. It isn't necessary to stain before varnishing and ...


4

Belt-style floor sanders were current years ago, but more recently the best bet is a random-orbit style sander like the Varathane ezV sander. The random-orbit sanders don't have nearly the risk of grooving that the belt sanders do, and these ones also have a built-in vaccuum which collects a large portion of the dust, unlike the sanders of my childhood. ...


3

If you can get under your deck I'd try and do a test sanding just using sandpaper and some arm strength to see how easy the stamps come off. I'd be willing to bet a small orbital sander would do the trick with some fine grit paper. Orbital sanders are pretty cheap so convincing the wife shouldn't be too much trouble. Maybe hop on craigslist or ebay and see ...


2

I was curious if you could wash those off and found an article that has four different ways to wash off stamp ink: http://www.ehow.com/how_5185607_remove-ink-stamp-wood.html. Of course this is talking about stamp pad ink but I would try one of these to see if you could get the ink out first before going to sanding it (sanding could be visible if you are not ...


2

You will need: Carbide scrapers of different sizes Paint spray gun (will save you TONS of time) Several good quality brushes -- edging and flat shapes Wood hardener for any isolated rotted spots of wood Wood filler or bondo to spot-patch rotted areas Extra replacement siding Saw(s) -- circular, oscillating multitool, etc Hammer, nails (galvanized) Aluminum ...


2

While I would be lost without a belt sander and a detail sander, for most medium to fine finishing work, I would vote for a variable speed, 6" random orbit sander, with velcro pad (as opposed to PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive). Get one with 6 hole dust pickup for integration with a shop vac, such as.. What are the relative ad/disadvantages of random ...


1

Anything that sands across the grain on wood puts scratches in the growth rings that can be hard to remove. Orbital sanders are good for removing homogenous materials like paint where you don't want a pattern to the marks left by the sand paper. As you use finer paper, the random action leaves finer scratches till the surface is smooth. Finish sanding on ...


1

The holes on the discs may not line up with the ones in the base--if they don't, you'll have to be careful. As you say it will interfere with air flow, which will affect cooling, sanding, and sawdust removal. I'm not sure whether it's enough to damage the tool, unless maybe if you're sanding for hours, but the results may not be as good.. If you do use ...


1

I rented the Varathane sander as mentioned in the other post from Lowes. I also purchased the water based finish and sanding disks. There was an instruction booklet with the sander that walked you through the process. I used a handheld random orbital sander to sand in the corners. The entire process cost about $150 and took two days. I sanded down to ...


1

Rent a drum sander, but practice in an out-of-the-way area first! You can easily sand grooves into your floor. With the drum sander you should be able to get within a few inches of the baseboards, then you'll need to use some type of hand sander.


1

It looks like you're using untreated dimensional lumber for your deck. If you want that to last you really need to paint it. That would get rid of the stamps. Untreated fir like that really doesn't like to be outdoors. Even with a deck sealer you're not going to get the life out of it that you'll be happy with I think. Especially if it's uncovered as most ...



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