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1

I had an electric shock as a teenager - I grabbed the cable of a plug-in light, and the rubber insulation turned out to be broken exactly where my fingers were. My fingers bent involuntarily, making the grip stronger and I am still alive only because my mum managed to pull the plug out. It is unforgettable experience, so I always shut off the entire ...


0

I use a multimeter and check all three pairs (live-neutral, live-ground, and neutral-ground) before doing anything. This lets me catch bad wiring, as well as things like a leak to ground that may not have a high enough voltage to trigger an NCV or other yes/no tester.


8

1. Test. 2. Confirm. 3. Do work. 4. Check your work. Always test the tester. (Preferably with a different tester.) NCV's should only be used to confirm an outlet should work, NOT that it is dead. They are also nice for locating CBs if you want to play the flip on/off game, though not to be used for confirmation of that either. Item 4, the ...


3

Unlucky to have come across a dodgy installation. What follows is a US experience, same voltage. We lived in a house dating from "Rural Electrification" so that might give you an idea of the age of the fuse panel. There was this coiled bit of Romex hanging off a nail in the eaves, bare clipped off ends, that was hot. After pulling all the fuses and the Range ...


12

The paranoid way to use a non contact voltage tester is: Test that outlet shows as live Flip breaker test that outlet shows as dead Test a different outlet that should still be live The last step is what would have saved you a shock here - its to check that your tester didn't die while you were flipping the breaker, and that you haven't done anything ...


2

Always verify the non-contact voltage tester is working properly, before trusting it (this is true for any tool, I guess). Aside from that, it just sounds like you were unlucky. This is why it's important to know what you're doing, before attempting any DIY project. The person before you obviously did not, and the end result could have been your death ...


2

In the United States, most building codes require a minimum dimension for wood studs in bearing walls is 2x4(nominal). The number of jack-studs varies with the size of building, the width of the opening, and the ground snow load from 1 to many. It is common for building codes to allow the use of approved framing anchors, in lieu of jack studs when only one ...


3

Have him re-frame it, as it almost certainly won't pass inspection. Not sure what the code specifies in you area, but the International Residential Code is really specific as to the requirements: R603.7 Jack and king studs. The number of jack and king studs installed on each side of a header shall comply with Table R603.7(1). King, jack and ...


1

There's another option that's a good compromise between the overkill of a powerful band saw and the slowness of hand tools that others have suggested. A band saw is going to be fast and offer you nice straight cuts but come on... Even after safety, consider how many separate cuts you're going to have to make on these little guys. Personally I'd opt for ...


8

Actually, the way the manufacturer probably makes these is to run them through a moulding die so you get one long meeple, then you cut the meeples off at the thickness you want them. You could emulate the moulding die by make the cuts I labelled above using a table saw with the blade tilted (you can then use a push-stick to push your stock through safely), ...


15

Create a jig to hold the pieces in position for the various cuts. The jig will allow to maintain a safe distance from the blade and if designed well will give you a secure grip on the piece being cut. Also try to design your cuts for mass production. For example cut the gap between the legs and around the heads while all the pieces are still one long piece ...


3

Hand tools are definitely the way to go. A Dremel type tool or hand router may be used for fine work. If you need to do larger quantities, find a laser or water jet cutter in your neighbourhood.


5

Do not use a band saw. It will not come out well. You could consider a scroll saw, but I would not use that either if it was me. The proper technique: Draw or print the figure on paper, cut it out Paste paper on a stiff piece of sheet metal Use tin snips to cut out the metal template Use a mill file to smooth the edges of the metal template Cut square ...


15

Don't. Use a coping saw with a very low profile or spiral blade. Woodworking small enough pieces to worry about your fingers means it'd be just as easy with a hand saw. Doresoom's edit about routing is most likely how they are factory produced.


13

For cutting meeples, I would not use a band saw. I would use a scroll saw. Unless you have an insanely narrow bandsaw blade you won't be able to navigate the turns. An option is to use a drill press to bore out the armpit and crotch area of the meeples. You could probably use the bandsaw to remove the rest of the waste. If you insist on using the bandsaw, ...


5

If your fingers are getting too close to a tool, it's time for a jig. If I was going to try to do this with a bandsaw, I'd consider putting the piece I was working in a screw clamp. That would give you a larger object to manipulate, keeping your fingers away from the workpiece... and if you cut into the screw clamp that's not a disaster; they're wood so they ...


25

Do not wear gloves while using a bandsaw (or any powered saw, drill press, or planer for that matter). The gloves will give you a false sense of security and do very little to protect your hands. In fact, they may end up getting your fingers pulled into the blade if the material catches. Which would you prefer: a cut fingertip, or a mangled hand? The best ...


1

I would protect my fingers by keeping them away from the blade. when I use my chop saw, I hold the piece I'm cutting by keeping it long and only cutting off the far end. It might call for sacrificing a little material since the last 4–5 inches is too short to safely cut that way. For example, to cut squares for a checkerboard or chessboard, let's ...


0

Youtube is a surprisingly good teaching tool, and any book on the subject will probably be worth reading but if you're serious the best and safest way to learn is to work with somebody that already knows what they're doing. The master/apprentice relationship helps you learn in three ways, 1. Direct Communication: "do it this way". 2. Critical Communication: ...



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