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0

Go to www.provisiontools.com, I think this would be a much safer option. Plus the PiViT Ladder Tool has 8 functions and is a must own for anyone who uses a ladder on a regular basis.


1

You say "that room". Circuits are not nearly always designated to one room or area. Many, many times a room will have some devices on one circuit while others on another circuit. It is pretty rare that rooms are strictly wired so that one circuit distinctly feeds one room. Also, panel directories are not always extremely accurate. So something that says the ...


4

And here is why you check it before hand, even though you have turned off that room. People get into Junction boxes and re-wire - joining two separate circuits into one - in that case one circuit in the house can be fed from two breakers (as long as they are on the same phase). Always check with testor - and NOT JUST a proximity induction testor - but an ...


1

Yes. Once you shut off the room fuse, no electricity will be going to that room. However it is important to test all connections before working on them so you are positive that they are not powered.


-3

Fresh water is nowhere near as conductive as many people believe (salt water is). I used to have a plug for an outdoor sump pump that was frequently completely submerged. Pump ran fine, no one got electrocuted (including the cat), breaker never tripped. So, unless you plan to use the plug (meaning: insert and remove cords) during a major storm i wouldn't ...


19

Yes, there is a risk. Even a properly installed and protected electrical system can fail to protect you, either because of unforeseen situations or component failure. There are two types of flaps. One is watertight only when not in use and closed. This is probably what you have. This type of outlet is only meant to be used temporarily when exposure to ...


0

There are direct-vent boilers designed for installation in habitable space -- the one I've got is in the basement, but was designed so it could be installed in a closet as an auxilliary, and is certified for direct contact with combustibles like wood and paper. Theoretically it's safe from the carbon monoxide or heat points of view, as long as it's properly ...


0

I don't know whether you own the property or not but there are these devices that you plug into the outlet that have a color code to let you know if you have any faults with that outlet (as in problems with the wiring). See if this will help, otherwise call an electrician. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Tools-GCFI-Receptacle-Tester-RT200/203195019 The ...


0

I wonder if the voltage in your house is too high and causing the toaster ovens to burn out. You can check the voltage with a multimeter or a device like a Kill-a-watt meter, which is also useful for checking power consumption. In the US, the nominal voltage is 120V, give or take some tolerance. I would say anything over 125V is probably worth looking into ...


2

No. A toaster oven is (mostly) just a resister. You'd have to see a large surge to kill a toaster oven. I don't think any other electrical malfunction would kill it. Your outlet is probably fine, and I think you're suffering from bad luck.


4

Since you're working with other minors, at a very minimum, you should follow OSHA guidelines: Skin Irritation: Wet portland cement can cause caustic burns, sometimes referred to as cement burns. Cement burns may result in blisters, dead or hardened skin, or black or green skin. In severe cases, these burns may extend to the bone and cause disfiguring ...


4

Considering how little exposure you will get to the mortar for your small project, you're probably fine with just your work gloves. Wearing latex gloves under your work gloves will provide additional protection. I would suggest that for the people who will be working directly with the mortar. Big picture, more important than gloves is breathing protection. ...


0

I'm guessing that your water heater has a draft hood, and is not sealed combustion. When your whole-house fan is operating, it drops the pressure in the house, and probably in the basement also. If so, it can easily reverse the draft on your water heater even with a perfect venting system. This is not an immediate problem if the combustion is clean, which it ...


0

I have recently had your dilemma. It wasn't pretty. My solution was to cut two one inch discs from the end of the tree trunk. In my case these were discarded in the garage. I used these discs as shims/wedges between the screws of the stand. It made the tree more secure and so far the tree has held firm. By the way I only placed the discs/wedges on either ...


3

Yes, it's good possibility that if you don't purposefully depressurize the lines first, you will get spray. But this is easy to do. Turn off the hot water heater. If it's electric, there is usually an off position on the knob on the front, or turn it off at the breaker panel. If it's gas, just turn the knob to pilot. Turn off the cold water supply to the ...


2

You could leave the switch as-is but then install one of various types of switch guards to prevent accidental switch setting changes. Here are a few examples...


1

1) Not necessarily; depends on local codes. NYC code circa 2008 required it, and as a result I have one. 2c) 'It is fine as it is'. You can put some tape over the switch to discourage people from whacking it in the dark if you need to, and you can change the faceplate to indicate that it is now a 'Gas Burner Emergency Shutdown Switch'



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