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Last time our hot water sprang a leak, the plumber wisely put in a cutoff valve right in front of the replacement water heater. We always turn it off when we go out of town (and the washing machine hose lines too), and never had an issue. As others noted, it would be safest to cut the power to the water heater if turned off for an extended period.


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Normally but also depending on the age of the home there is a cold water shutoff behind the tub/shower handle assembly. Remove the handle usually a Phillip screw holds it on. Next remove round lock ring which is threaded on using channel lock pliers being careful not to deform the ring. Remove large round silver plate. You will see a round shutoff that has a ...


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I have shocked myself touching one of the pins on a USA NEMA connector. My finger just slipped around the end at the wrong moment. So, this is anecdotal, but yes, it is a concern. What do to about it - I think it is a matter of awareness. Perhaps NEMA users have adopted hand postures which normally reduce this risk. This seems to be a risky approach - ...


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I've been working as a service tech.for the last 20 yrs & in my opinion I would install it right under your thermostat, assuming that IT'S installed at the correct height which would be about 5 & a half ft.from the floor or about eye or face level, reason being is that carbon monoxide enters your blood stream by way of the air you breathe.If it's a ...


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Offgassing has never really been a concern with treated lumber. Direct skin contact and ingestion were concerns with CCA treatment, and to a lesser degree with the products that have replaced it. As long as you're not spending a lot of time in contact with wet wood, and as long as your pets and family members aren't gnawing on it, I wouldn't be concerned.


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Calcium chloride works best for deicing (down to -25 °F) and it releases heat as it dissolves. So, using less means having fewer problems. In terms of usage rates, calcium chloride is less toxic or corrosive than sodium, potassium, or magnesium chloride. Sodium chloride only works down to +20 °F Potassium chloride only works down to +25 °F Magnesium ...


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I'd look at hinge stops, and use them in pairs (or even triples). They apply a large force to the hinge screws and the door skin, so using multiples distributes the load. For reference only. If your doors are very heavy, consider a closer as recommended by Ed Beal.


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I would use a door closer that can hold open like this. A bit expensive but it may solve your problem without creating a trip hazard. Other than this a rubber wedge type stop would be useful, but it sounds like you want something better than a wedge.


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How can NEMA [1-15, IEC Type A] electric plug [in Japan] be safe? Nothing is safe. There are only degrees of safety. European plugs incorporate more safety features, which makes them safer. But they also work with higher voltages, which are slightly more dangerous (230 instead of 120 in US or 100 in Japan). UK Plugs and outlets have many more safety ...


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That space is pretty small and it's hard to get a finger in there. If it's far enough out that you could, then it's not far enough in to make electrical contact. So yes there can be a 1/4" gap, but your kid would have to get imaginative with paper clips to get to it. Also, the voltage is half the Euro/APac voltage. And, if you are at current code, you ...



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