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Look into a downdraft table that you can exhaust outside. These are typically used for sanding or painting but the premise is the same. The table is perforated and sucks air down and then out to a dust collector or other exaust mechanism. You would place the printer on the table and ensure the exaust is running while you print.


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I would suggest a box (perhaps a prefab cabinet) around the printer, and a duct leading to an exhaust fan connected to the box, leading to outside (through a wall, or if renting, through a fan-plate inserted in a window opening.) I would NOT depend on any sort of filter.


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Having done 3D printing with ABS myself, I'm familiar with this challenge. You need to exhaust the fumes--that's the long and short of it. Locate the printer near a window, open the window, and have a fan blowing air out the window every time you use the printer. Crack a window on the other side of your house for make-up air purposes. Or print with PLA, ...


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Just to let you all know .I am a Oftec registered Technician and kerosene is the safest form of fuel to work with and is very unlikely to cause a fire .However precautions must be made to prevent the likely hood of a fire in close proximity by adhering to the regulations set out by Oftec. Kerosene will only ignite if it is atomised or vaporised.If you cut a ...


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Using an air compressor to provide air is solving the wrong problem. There is something else wrong with your setup, such as a significant line losses in your tubing. 2 psi is enough to raise water over 4 feet, 5 psi should give you 11 feet of head. 1 atmosphere of pressure, about 14 psi, is about 33 feet of head, which is way more than what you're dealing ...


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Would applying a safety factor to the maximum PSI in the PVC lines allow me to safely use PVC? Yes it probably would, as long as this is a personal project at your home or property. If this is in a workplace then it is likely you would be breaking the law by using unprotected PVC. I would regulate it to no more than what is necessary to provide desirable ...


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That will depend on exact details of the tube's thickness and alloy, how force is being applied at the fulcrum, ... I suggest getting expert advice on this one and buying something spec'd by forces it has to carry rather than trying to guess by size.


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In the 2008 version of National Electrical Code, replacements were not required to be TR. However, now receptacles must be replaced with TR receptacles, if TR receptacles are required in that location. As near as I can tell, nearly all dwelling unit receptacles must be TR as of 2014 code. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for ...


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The battery is too close to the motor, so if the user does something like try to bore through five feet of diorite, everything could heat up and then the battery explodes.


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Nearly all Li-Ion battery product recalls are fire risks. See Boeing 787 at the more embarrassing end of that spectrum. "Customer service peons" not knowing why is more an example of "customer service" being done by people with scripts in some other country who have never even seen the product that don't have an updated script than the company "not knowing ...


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Cap the wires (done) and simply fold them into the box. Obtain the cover plate of your choice at the nearest home center. Electrical codes to not permit permanent covering of junction boxes, but there's a qualifier: if the circuit is disconnected at the panel (wires detached from breaker) then it doesn't count as a circuit anymore. But it is unlikely that a ...


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You can leave the ground wire bare, it's fine. As long as the other wires are capped off so that no bare metal is exposed, then those are fine, too. You can bend the wires and stuff them all into the box, then put a blank faceplate on the box. You cannot cover the box with sheetrock or anything. You have to leave it accessible.



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