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4

If I saw that in my basement I wouldn't worry about it until the column (post) started moving. But if I did want to get proactive I'd get a jack and a 4x4 set up next to that column and jack it until that post is loose. Then put a new steel plate in there which should last the next 50 years. And since this is internet advice and might actually be ...


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You actually have two problems, starting with how to get the post out of the sleeve now. The first thing to try is some force, and the easiest form of force here would be a hammer. Circle the post, whacking it right above where it enters the sleeve (the harder the better, although use your judgement on avoiding damaging the post). Hopefully that will shear ...


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Following Iggy's advice I would just scrape it and re-paint it with Rustoleum. It will probably outlast all of us. If you want to save the post, follow jqning's advice with the two jacks. Unless you are OCD and just can't stand the look of it. In that case just buy a standard adjustable screw-jack post (pretty cheap at the box stores) and put it right ...


1

Remove as much of the rust as you can using any of various mechanical methods, then treat it with a chemical rust converter. The rust converter will treat the iron oxides to help prevent future corrosion and will also leave a protective water resistant coating. Try to spread the converter to overlap onto sound areas, and maybe try to use a cotton swab to ...


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If you wish to actually de-rust the tub, you have a few options, most of which are slightly destructive, to remove the rust. Wire wheels or other powered grinding/sanding devices will be quickest, but remove the most material. Hand sanding/abrading will remove less material and may allow you to shape your result more easily. Using an abrasive cleaning ...


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You are of course, right to be concerned with this column. It is supporting the floor above it, and would cause significant damage to your home if it failed. It is unclear how long the current one will last if left alone. The bottom plate already has significant amounts of oxidation, and it is only a matter of time before it does fail. The replacement of ...


1

I agree with Ed Beal. If you want them back to Like New you'll need a can or 2 of Auto Stripper from an Auto Parts store. But, you'll treat the rust the same whether you strip them or not. If the rust is light then a putty scraper to remove the paint blisters & an S.O.S. pad or steel wool will take that away to get you back to bare metal. Or, best is to ...


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that looks like just surface rust. wipe it with strong citric acid or some commercial rust remover (like CLR or Limeaway). if it all comes off, its just some rust that has dripped down from the upper port. assuming there are no current leaks, you can just wirebrush it off and seal with a rust converter (corroseal or 3m marhyde are by far the best at this ...


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I have used a wire-wheel on an electric drill to remove loose paint and rust from a radiator. It can be hard work but you can get down to bright clean steel using those tools. Your case looks extreme but I would try that to judge the effectiveness. I would aim to remove all traces of rust. If there is too much rust for this to be practical, that might be a ...


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Oh finally a picture. Thank You! Yeah, you could flash over it with galvanized, aluminum, copper or stainless. But, the problem is cutting it in. You'd want to match the cut-in on the chimney all the way up the roof slope's wall. That's to do it right. But, plenty of guys cover the old with new to just caulk & screw the new stuff to the wall. It's ...



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