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16

While I don't use hand tools much, I certainly own a lot of hand tools. This happens when you sell them all day. Norm Abram at This Old House provides some pretty good tips on cleaning rust from tools. His tips, summarized: First, store tools in a dry drawer or toolbox. Use silica gel packets to keep this place even more dry. But once rust appears... ...


11

This stuff is sick: http://www.evaporust.com/ I used it on a drill press my buddy left out on a patio in the rain for a year. Virtually no scrubbing. I don't understand how this is not one of the most widely known products in the world. It is THAT good. I guess with the military as a client, they don't need the business from the public. Here are some ...


8

I've used this stuff; amazing. One of the most amazing products I have ever got my hands on. I had a drill press left in the rain for two years. I soaked the parts in this and restored to near brand new. The original machine marks can still be seen. http://www.evaporust.com/ Harbor Fright carries gallons for $20. You can reuse it over and over too. I ...


7

Having dealt with a bunch of door hinges that have been painted on, I've formulated a series of steps that have worked so far: Remove the paint/rust from the screw head. For paint, I've found a gel paint stripper to be effective. As you point out, naval jelly or a penetrating oil can be used on rust. You can also try using a rotary tool fitted with an ...


6

No. The rust is inconsequential and those pipes will likely outlive the gas meter equipment itself. The reason that the rust is at the threads is because the threads are not painted well on purpose; it prevents a good seal when they're putting the gas meter together. Depending on your gas company's policies, painting the gas meter could be a violation of ...


6

With one of these: Enamel Repair Kit You simply sand out any rust in the chipped enamel, then paint on a new enamel coating. The finished repair should be permanent, and if well-done nearly undetectable.


4

Silica Gel often has a color indicator, either going from blue(dry) to pink(wet), or from orange(dry) to green(wet). By heating the gel to 250 °F for 2 hours, you can restore the gel to its dry state and reuse it.


4

Those covers are usually sprayed with dry paint, that is heated and cured in an over to give the best protection. So a DIY fix will only solve it temporoary. First of all you need to get rid of the "cancer" which is not always easy. With some coarse sand paper 100/200 grit lightly loosen scratch the affected area.(lightly no need to apply great force) ...


4

I've always just used steel wool etc. and elbow grease. But if you really want to get crafty, pull rust from your tools using electrolysis. Check out ToolNut's step-by-step instructions on how to make a DIY electrolyzer for about $40 at instructables.com.


4

Use a cleaning product called CLR also known as calcium,lime and rust remover. It is available at hardware stores and home centers.


4

Is the garage door made out of steel? Here is a good article on repainting rusty steel: I think the key is to prep by washing the area and then removing as much rust as possible by scraping and then using a wire brush (or even sanding). Prime the area with Rustoleum. The topcoat should be high quality latex exterior paint.


4

I use CLR for that sort of thing. The main purpose in my house is for hardwater scale, which accumulates on everything, but it also works on rust. Handle with care, it is wicked strong.


3

I would try a wire brush first. Either a hand model or a rotary one that would fit into your power drill may do the trick. You can also get small toothbrush size wire brushes to get into the small spots. Good Luck


3

In the end I ended up using drill bits to drill out the area around the screw heads and then I was able to get enough leverage to yank the top off. We were going to replace the lamp head anyways, so this ended up working out fine.


3

They are competing products that are both advertised to do the same five things (WD-40, CRC 5-56). It's not clear that one is any better than the other.


3

Not sure about "Sure fire" but a product called CLR (Calcium, Lime, Rust remover) is a good start.


3

Oil-based enamels "key" well to metal (better than latex) and are the go-to for protecting metal from oxidation. You will first need to remove all oxidation using some wet-dry sandpaper (or in extreme cases an angle grinder). There are products that will turn rust into primer; these can SOMETIMES help but really they're usually just a "quick fix", and in all ...


3

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


3

Instead of using a rope to wrap the pipe I would use a piece of heavy chain. The technique is to wrap the chain around the pipe several times and then connect the ends up short together leaving enough of a loop to poke a timber such as a 4x4 through the loop. Use a 4x4 about 8 to 10 feet long and use it as a lever over the top of a short fulcrum post. If the ...


2

The DMV don't expect their license plates back in pristine condition, they usually get them back beat up as hell, so just pry them off with a screwdriver. If the edges of the plates are bent out of shape they will not care as they're going into the junk pile anyway.


2

ReRack from Performix (same people that make Plasti-Dip) is specially made for repairing dishwasher racks. It has decent reviews on Amazon.com.


2

This stuff https://www.google.com/search?gcx=w&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=naval+jelly is what I was told to use - have yet to try it


2

Perhaps naval jelly would (Phosphoric acid) do the trick? Or maybe electrolysis…


2

A dremmel tool with grinding or cutting attachments may be a good way to go after this guy. Sometimes you cut of the head, sometimes you cut a new screwdriver slot. Diamond tools at harbor freight are cheap and may work. An angle grinder can be used on big guys. I have normally only had to use this on really rusted material or hardened hardware. ...


2

Two thing to try for a badly rusted screw. The first is heat - get a torch and heat it up. That should also burn away any paint as well. Of course, it will also affect the area around the screw. And when a screw is completely mangled, you can always re-slot it with a dremel - take a look at this.


2

It's kind of expensive just for this purpose, but I find an impact driver works wonders on rusted screws, screws with messed up heads, stubborn screws and bolts, etc. I've been shocked at how much I use my cordless impact driver -- I use it so much that my cordless drill is now only used for drilling.


2

It's an enamel coated steel (verify with a strong magnet). There are DIY repair kits, but your rust looks pretty serious. You'd need to start by taking the sink out, using a grinding wheel to get down to bare steel, then building up epoxy/enamel repair. Yours may be a builder special of low quality: and the rust looks pretty bad. I'd recommend a new sink. ...


1

To clean old rusty tools, old shears, or even old rusty needles, soak them overnight in ketchup. Some may need a second soak. Clean them with hot water and dry them, and apply a thin coat of coconut oil or olive oil. Store in a dry tool box with silica gel; cat litter also works to keep them dry.


1

My mom taught me how to use crumpled up aluminum foil dipped in water to scrub away rust spots on chrome. The beauty of this is that the aluminum is softer than the steel, so less scratches. I won't say no scratch marks, because some of the rust particles or chrome flakes might get ground in. Obviously you need to dry your piece thoroughly after using ...


1

They make spray paint designed to go on "right over the rust". A wire brush to get off any loose flaking paint and rust, then spray away. Rustoleum is one brand, but basically if you go to the hardware store, find the paint area, then look around for shelves full of spray cans, you will hit the jackpot. Read the label to be sure, but if the word Rust is in ...



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