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7

No. The rust is inconsequential and those pipes will likely outlive the gas meter equipment itself. The reason that the rust is at the threads is because the threads are not painted well on purpose; it prevents a good seal when they're putting the gas meter together. Depending on your gas company's policies, painting the gas meter could be a violation of ...


4

If I saw that in my basement I wouldn't worry about it until the column (post) started moving. But if I did want to get proactive I'd get a jack and a 4x4 set up next to that column and jack it until that post is loose. Then put a new steel plate in there which should last the next 50 years. And since this is internet advice and might actually be ...


4

Any coating of grease or other rust inhibitor will wear off over time. The right approach is to use fasteners that are corrosion resistent either due to their material (such as stainless or brass), or are plated (with zinc, chrome, or other durable material).


4

DA01 is correct about direct contact with concrete to a point. If the steel and concrete are above ground grade and the concrete is beveled enough for any water to run off or not collect around the pipe, then serious rusting will take a very long time. As far as rust proofing the steel pipe, clean the metal very well. Sand off any paint or other materials. ...


4

Given the direct flame exposure, and that the flames are actually quite a bit hotter than BBQ paint is rated for (1950C for natural gas, 2392C for propane) I'd suggest sticking to clean, coat with vegetable oil (wipe on a thin layer) and bake. This makes a pretty good finish, and does not involve anything that's not going to happen in normal food preparation ...


4

Yes you can paint them with high heat BBQ grill paint. You can find this paint at any hardware store, walmart or lowes etc. It is rated for 1400 degrees normally. Be aware, however, that the surface in contact with your pans will wear off fairly quickly. I personally would paint the grates, then burnish the paint off where it makes contact with the pans so ...


3

The finish shown is a type of paint - "Hammerite" is either the name, or the brand name of the most popular/first version. It's presumably on mild steel. However, any automotive paint should work (think about it) - and COULD be cheap if you have a cooperative paint shop and you don't care what color it is (ie, they can spray some excess when they spray ...


3

Is the garage door made out of steel? Here is a good article on repainting rusty steel: I think the key is to prep by washing the area and then removing as much rust as possible by scraping and then using a wire brush (or even sanding). Prime the area with Rustoleum. The topcoat should be high quality latex exterior paint.


2

ReRack from Performix (same people that make Plasti-Dip) is specially made for repairing dishwasher racks. It has decent reviews on Amazon.com.


2

If it's in direct contact of the concrete, note that you may eventually have issues there (as concrete can easily wick up ground moisture).


2

Rigid conduit (which is pretty much the same thing as galvanized steel pipe) is galvanized with a considerably thicker layer than EMT - it's also stronger (emt is a bit flimsy for a railing) and more expensive (such is life.) Since you didn't specify what type of galvanized metal conduit you were considering using, what happens will vary with the type you ...


2

Typical EMT Type conduit will resist rust for a few years. It is however inevitable that it will rust. The most likely place for rust to start will be at the ends where it has been cut or along the surface where the finish has been scratched. I've used EMT type conduit for various types of outdoor things and had some deployments last for many years without ...


2

I'd go to the manufacturer of the wood glue you want to use before you get too far along. Titebond is popular and I've had great luck with it, in their FAQ they have specific instructions for gluing up cedar, before you finish it, due to the oil in cedar. I think most of them are pretty oil resistant once they cure, especially polyurethane, which is ...


2

You could try using stainless steel bolts, dip in an anti-seizing compound like "Coppaslip". Under the head use locking washer, a good option is the "Nord-Lock" it is a 2 piece device, 2 washers that have serrated edge on one side and a series of wedges on the opposite side. The serrated edges grip the bolt head and the structure, the wedge faces face each ...


2

Following Iggy's advice I would just scrape it and re-paint it with Rustoleum. It will probably outlast all of us. If you want to save the post, follow jqning's advice with the two jacks. Unless you are OCD and just can't stand the look of it. In that case just buy a standard adjustable screw-jack post (pretty cheap at the box stores) and put it right ...


1

You are of course, right to be concerned with this column. It is supporting the floor above it, and would cause significant damage to your home if it failed. It is unclear how long the current one will last if left alone. The bottom plate already has significant amounts of oxidation, and it is only a matter of time before it does fail. The replacement of ...


1

Oh finally a picture. Thank You! Yeah, you could flash over it with galvanized, aluminum, copper or stainless. But, the problem is cutting it in. You'd want to match the cut-in on the chimney all the way up the roof slope's wall. That's to do it right. But, plenty of guys cover the old with new to just caulk & screw the new stuff to the wall. It's ...


1

I work for a natural gas company. Please call the gas company & advise you need your meter inspected for rust and they will clean and paint or replace the meter. It is the gas company's responsibility!!!!


1

Bondo is good for filling dents or depressions, and will probably do fine for completely filling small holes of this size. Epoxy putty is also a choice, often found in the US with either plumbing or car repair supplies. JB Weld is one common brand name; it has metal powder mixed in it so it dries very hard and durable.


1

If you lay concrete, ensure that the concrete laid with the high point against the post. this will ensure that water pooling does not happen around the metal pole.. you will still get rust, this is one way to prevent to a degree.


1

Exactly how you would in a car. Get rust out, bondo, prime, paint. Just painting the areas well to keep the moisture out will help a lot although not a long-term fix. Could also just replace that piece of metal or add another piece on top of it.


1

Normally gym equipment is powder-coated. in your picture, they have used an electrostatic powder coating process and finished with a sort of hammertone finish.. IMO- your options are as follows: Stainless steel is the best metal in terms of durability. it will never rust, however, its more expensive and is slightly harder to drill/bend. I would recommend ...


1

The original galvanizing of the fence was in a bath of molten tin (hot dip galvanizing). Since this is not practical for the old fence, there are cold galvanizing compounds. They are zinc rich paints. They will not stop rust that has broken through the original coating. Rust must be removed, then coat the bare steel. The aerosol versions would be ...


1

This question was answered before with a good solution shown at this posting: How can I repair a rusting dishwasher tray?



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