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So long as the installation meets the engineered design [and the design was properly engineered], the sole reason to choose one spacing over another is cost. In some cases larger spacing will require an upgrade to supplementary structural components such as framing anchors or increased straps or additional nails. The only way to know if there is a difference ...


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The primary advantage to closer truss spacing is greater load-bearing ability, which is important if the roof will have heavy stuff on it, like shingles and snow. With 24" OC trusses and a conventional shingle roof, you may need to shovel your roof from time to time to prevent snow buildup from becoming dangerous. On the other hand, you can decrease this ...


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I would say that it depends on the drip-edge and how the fascia are laid out on the edge. Galvanized drip-edge should easily span a 5/8" gap, and will certainly be less waste than flushing up the sheathing and cutting off 15" for starter courses. It mainly depends on having the drip-edge supported on both sides and having adequate room for nailing it down. ...


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I'm not entirely sure I'm grasping all the details here but in general I would say its better to go flush to the edge. Here's how you could lay it out mathematically speaking, but I'm not sure this is the most efficient way to go about it. Also I've never heard of doing an 1/8" space on sheathing, that just seems like an invitation for leaks, not to mention ...


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I have been researching these two shingles for a few days and the picture is ugly. Here is just the tip of what I have found on the GAF but there is a load more: http://www.law360.com/articles/408007/gaf-can-t-shake-shoddy-shingle-warranty-claims http://www.yourlawyer.com/topics/overview/gaf-timberline-shingles-class-action-lawsuit-degrading-cracking I ...



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