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1

Spray foam is fine here. Hire it out, don't try yourself. You won't save much if any money and this stuff is better installed by pros. Make sure the roof decking is bone-dry on the day they install it. Determine what kind of R-value you want, too. The stuff is so expensive that installers will often try to convince you that 2 to 4 inches is sufficient for a ...


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The tongue-and-groove wood planks conceal insulation above then, probably fiberglass batts between the rafters. As you've observed, they are clearly insufficient, because the room is too hot. There are two safe ways to improve the situation: Add more insulation underneath the existing ceiling wood, then install a vapor retarder (retarder, not barrier. A ...


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It doesn't make sense to do the inside before the roof has been replaced. The drywall will most likely end up getting damaged when the roof is being demoed and new sheathing is installed. The contractors may inadvertently step on the backside of the drywall and cave it in. There is also a big chance of some water damage. Keeping the original lathe for the ...


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It really depends on a lot of factors...namely your climate and how much space you have in the ceiling rafters. Ideally, you'd insulate with spray foam. That will give you the best r-value and act as a vapor barrier. You should be able to do it separate from the new roof but it may be a lot easier to just do it all at once. (It's a lot easier to toss lathe ...


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When it comes to what comes first both ways are acceptable but would be better if you do it all at once. Now when we speak about new roof cover material and procedures depend on type of covering material and there are so many options. But to put it in one word just apply standard procedures (if you use tiles go with the lathe etc.).Now once you cover the ...


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Look up RainHandler.com. These are non-gutter vanes that attach to the soffit, and spread water away from the edge of the roof. You can dismount them for the winter months.


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Before investing in active elements (electrical pumps), why not try out a passive installation? Simply building a second roof above the first -leaving an air-gap between the two- will help reduce incoming heat. The higher roof doesn't even need to be very strong, since it only has to handle its own weight (and perhaps also some wind). This used to be a ...


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Won't work. The insulation is sufficient to reduce the heat loss from your apartment at 25c to the snow or ice at -15c to a reasonably low value. Misters or evaporative coolers only reduce the temperature by a few degrees C, and most of the heat absorbed would come from the surrounding air, not your house. I'd suggest awnings over the windows, ...


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When the upper and lower rafters are of equal size, the static load balance requires that the slope of the lower rafter S2 should be 3 times more than the slope of the upper rafter S1. Then the force of the upper rafter pushing the joint point outward will be exactly equal to the force of the lower rafter pushing the joint inward. This is the case of 30 ...


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I also want to point out that "Aluminum does NOT hold heat" Aluminum is often used as a heat sink because it's a great conductor of heat. Meaning it absorbs and looses heat at a very high rate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_sink The best Heatsinks are made of 70% silver and 30% copper but these are so expensive and so far and few between it's really ...


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Yes, I would repair it with the same, or similar underlayment if I could. I would create small round patches, about 4 - 5 inches in diameter and then glue them down with a caulk that can stand up to those temperatures. Most roofing caulks would work well. Just be sure to make the job as smooth as possible; wipe away any excess caulk.



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