New answers tagged

1

This is the typical structure of a hip-roof: As you can see, the ridge board, or ridge beam, is holding up the "jack rafters" at the top of the incline. Arguably the 4 diagonal boards - the hip rafters - are holding up the ridge board on their own, but simply for load bearing purposes, place supports under the ends of the ridge board (and possibly one in ...


1

This would depend on if you're building a dog house, shed, home or villa. You are asking for specific answers about an obscure subject. Gather your information about the project and speak with a Qualified and Licensed Engineer in the jurisdiction that you will be doing the work.


0

in my time as a project manager for a construction company in TX and CA I learned that 3 is the maximum number of layers (legally) allowed anyway. If you're near a coast with hurricanes or in tornado areas, 2 layers is the max due to length of fasteners required to hold into the wood. Time to take them down, inspect the framing / sheathing and start fresh. ...


4

The rule of thumb is three layers maximum. After that you pull them all off and start over. Half a century is about time to get a good look at the sheathing, and if any of it is bad, a good time to inspect the joists as well. I'm not saying you need a structural engineer, but you'll want someone on the squad who knows when to say, "This has all got to go." ...


0

Check with your local/state laws about moving birds/wildlife first. I know in my area its illegal to move bats during certain times of year. Now birds aren't bats but bats also make noises that could sound like a bird to an untrained ear. Even if its birds, a lot of birds are protected here in the US so similar laws may apply. For bats they make 1 way ...


6

As Michael Karas said, this happened because the previous owner was possibly lazy or too cheap to afford labor and disposal... or they may have been physically impared and living on a budget. Adding an extra layer of shingles when the first layer has met it's life expectancy can buy a few more years... maybe 5 - 10 years but the life expectancy of second ...


18

No. Layers of shingles on top of each other shorten the life of the roof due to the newest layer sitting on an uneven lower surfaces. The best life will come from removing all the old layers down to roof boards or sheathing and then laying down the new roof on a well repaired flat surface. Multiple layers of shingles happen because folks want to avoid ...


0

The gable vents are short-circuiting the ventilation. The holes appear to be adequate, but as there's a shorter path of less resistance from in the gable vents and out the ridge vents, the holes don't draw very much air. I'd temporarily cover the gable vents from the inside and see how things change. Maybe take temperature and humidity readings at ...


1

judging by the shape and cut of the wood, the method of assembly and the size of the members, i would assume you have a tile roof? either way, it looks like it was built for a very heavy roof load. the rot you are seeing is just part of the problem, it most likely extends far into the timber and may even be present in the adjacent rafters. bracing the ...


0

It works for sure,especially on metal roofs. When continiously sprinkling a metal roof the roof works like a heat exchanger. You are carrying heat away faster than it comes :)


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Because asphalt shingles are slottet and have gsaps at their ends. Those openings are covered by the solid top of the (offset) next row down. At the bottom, tho cover those spaces, you need the coverage provided by the next row down. Rather than sdpent time cutting up shingles or getting a separate product for that space, we just use an additional nrow of ...


0

Short answer: go to the hardware store, buy whatever, paint it down and watch it fail in a few years. What you do at that point depends on what you used. Or you could consider over-roofing it with EPDM rubber, using the rubber-cement-like glue to stick it down (paint both surfaces and join them). The easy made-for-wood glue won't work. Careful pricing ...


1

If there is water dripping out from underneath your shingles (on the ice & water), then there is a problem with the roof installation which probably won't be addressed by installing a drip edge. There should only be water getting under the shingles in the specific case where you have a large amount of ice buildup above the overhang of the roof (where it ...


0

When your roof is installed , typically the drip edge is installed and then the ice and water shield is over top of the drip edge. Your never gonna get that ice and water shield up without damaging your roof. What I recommend do is getting a cheap roll of aluminum coil at Home Depot, its very inexpensive. It's around 10 bucks for a decent roll. What I ...


4

It is possible that your ice & water shield will peel up cleanly depending on age, climate, current temperature, sun exposure, etc. Try that first, otherwise... Installing drip edge under the two layers of shingle that should be present will take care of 99% of the water flow. The small amount that may come down during ice dam conditions may run under ...


0

Wire brush the whole area to knock off as much loose material and surface rust as you can, don't worry about the seams because you are going to waterproof them next. Purchase 1 gal. of good quality white elastomeric roof coating and a roll of fiberglass mesh tape (you can even use fiberglass drywall tape if you have some or if it's cheaper than specialty ...


1

First: yes you need to remove all the rust before repainting, or the paint will just flake off as the rust continues. Next: you need to make sure that there's some "body" left after initial sanding/scraping of rust, or you might as well replace the sheets. You also need to verify that all rust is on the top, i.e. there's no leaking and bottom-side rust ...


2

You need at least the same flow rate out of the hose that the pressure washer uses. look at the GPM (Gallons per minute). With the hose on the roof, run the hose wide open for a minute or 2 so you will have the true flow rate. Then fill a bucket and time how long it takes divide by the size of the bucket if your unit uses 2.5 gallons per minute, a 1 gallon ...


2

How do I make clean, square cuts to the rafter (tail)? You may want to try to gently insert shims to add a little extra space between the rafter and the 1x4 roof boards. I would use a circular saw to start; you will not be able to cut all the way through (5") with a common circular saw, but it will give you a clean cut through a few inches. You'll need to ...


2

I think your staggered-joint idea is a good one. From the look of it you'll have a solid enough base to get another decade or two from that tail. I'd cut back just enough to get solid wood at the center, then notch the sides back to wherever you can comfortably fit the saw. Something like so: | | |__ __| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ...


1

I would use a combination of approaches for this. To cut away the rotten wood I would use a small door jamb saw. It's handle is offset - it will make working in that space easier. You probably won't be left with much good wood. To shore up the rotten wood, I would inject epoxy. The West system is ideal for this. It's not cheap, but it's cheaper than taking ...


1

We just had this problem and was prepared to go over what ever wouldn't come off. Suddenly it became cloudy and the temp dropped about 15 to 20 degrees. What had been a sticky mess like trying to get flys off fly paper suddenly became brittle and wanted to chip off. It was still work but working around from diffrent sides using a shingle shovel with small ...


0

Bug spray the bottoms of your shoes then wipe off. Flat rubber shoes are best also.



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