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0

The OSB these days has way better glues/resins than ten years ago. OSB, especially subfloor, holds up to moisture better than CDX. Advantech is one of the best and it is an OSB product! I wish people would get over their unbased biases and chill out!


2

You have a redundant roof drain. If one of them were to fail (clog) the other would (hopefully) continue to allow water to drain from the roof. If you were to cap one of them And the only drain were to become clogged water would accumulate on your roof to possibly it failed (or found a new route to the inside). as for it leaking: it would be easiest to open ...


0

In the UK we fit all our chimneys with a 'cage' or 'balloon' made from strong wire formed into a ball (other decorative shapes are available) with long stiff legs that are pushed into the chimney pot to hold it in place. The ball shape prevents large birds from building nests on top of the warm flues, ironic since most folks around here call them 'bird ...


1

Since it will be a conditioned space you will want to use as much insulation as possible to increase the R- value. If you intend to cover each bay (space between rafters) with drywall it would be wise to leave at least a 1 inch space between the bottom of the roof planks and the insulation to allow water vapor from the inside a way to dissipate to the ...


16

Sounds like you need a chimney cap These come in a variety of sizes and shapes. They keep out most rain and snow and, most importantly, animals. You should attach any cap with stainless screws and lead anchors. Sealant is not a big issue, since there is no need for air or water tight joints. While sealant might hold in most conditions, strong winds ...


-1

Do not allow squirrels or any animals access to roof by eliminating trees which are less than 6 feet away.


0

There is no way to waterproof your roof without removing the deck. And if you remove the deck to waterproof the roof, re-attaching the deck in the same manner would create new holes where you drive the new fasteners, or puncture the waterproofing if you drive them through the same holes. This building assembly is fundamentally, fatally flawed and cannot be ...


0

when I installed the roofing on my house I did the same thing and in hind sight I could have used shorter nails , but the building code in my area wants the roof nails to penetrate at least 3/4 inches into the sheathing. Anyway... my solution was to cover the roof eaves by screwing 3/8" rough sawn siding to the rafters bottom edge enclosing each bay and ...


1

I'd recommend Not using any petroleum-based sealant on any surface subject to heat (it will soften and melt). For a positive and weatherproof seal use any 100% silicone caulking (Dap, Owen-Corning, etc.). For an even better and longer lasting seal against water go with any exterior Urethane caulking. Well worth the slight cost increase, but is U.V resistant ...


1

I don't have enough rep to comment, so in the form of an answer: I fully agree with Tester101. You need to protect the lower roof from a large flow of water in a narrow space and incorporate the elbow at the end to bring it into the gutter. I have a copper tile roof and did something similar to protect it. The differences in my approach were: I used an ...


1

I had a similar problem caused by the lower gutter being overhung by the roof too much. There was only actually about 1/3 of the gutter 'visible' for rain from the roof to fall into. It was resolved by repositioning the guttering. (In our case that was relatively trivial as the guttering was mounted on extendible brackets fitted to the rafter feet).


2

Skip sheathing for shake roofs used to be really common around my area of the country and I've never removed it (or seen anybody else remove it for that matter). OSB or plywood over skip sheathing makes for a much stiffer roof deck, resists problems with expansion better, and obviously doesn't require all the hassle of removing it. After you strip the ...


0

The only skip sheathing I've ever encountered is that installed to support a tin roof. What I found, was that the sheathing was not a consistent thickness which made laying osb or plywood on top quite difficult. Granted, these were in rural areas where the roof decking seemed to be made of the materials at hand, and not by a professional roofer, but before ...


53

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


5

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


0

I have taken these or these to alleviate a similar problem. You would just be tweaking your gutter on your own. You can push up on the gutter and put the screw or bracket in. The hope is that you would be able to do this enough so that the angle of the roof points straight into the wall of the gutter rather than over it. Though my first go would be a 90 ...


7

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd ...


7

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


0

It turns out that moisture was the problem. The water beaded on the ceiling and dripped down. The shed needed additional ventilation.



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