New answers tagged

1

Gotta love armchair quarterbacks. I live in the Caribbean. Houses are constructed of concrete block with stucco/parging covering the block. Roofs are usually terracotta tile or concrete tiles. Very few dwellings have an attic space to separate the exterior roof from the interior roof and insulation is a word that hasn't yet been defined here. Concrete stores ...


0

The real answer is: Don't do anything until you've identified the root cause. Find the leak. FLashing and sealant can be replaced a lot more easily than a whole new unit, not to mention the difference in cost and time. Similarly, if there's a leak where the glass (and frame) separates from the support frame as you open the skylight, address that ...


0

If it's a composite roof, I think it's a little more work to roof over the skylight just because of the interior sheet rock repair, but much more expensive to buy a new skylight. You don't need to do any framing to tear out the skylight, but to do it right you should remove the sheet rock from the skylight walls, and repair the hole in the ceiling. If you ...


2

Ridge vent alone should cost at most a few hundred dollars on top of the roof repair. It's a matter of ripping a channel in the roof boards, laying down a mesh or molded plastic vent, and capping it with shingles. However, if you already have other vents lower on the roof, you probably don't want to add ridge venting. Either add more box vents or close ...


-1

Remove for sure. You can replace a skylight, throw down flashing around it, caulk it up and basically do a really good install in about 1-2 hours (not accounting demo as this is all over the place with skylights) per light. If you totally remove it you are going to have to do a lot of patchwork on the roof and a lot of shingle repair. You might have cut ...


3

It looks like the answer is "probably not." If this calculator from the American Wood Council is to be believed (and if my assumptions about your materials and load are correct), the max span is about 10ft for a pine 2x6. This table agrees that 10-12ft is the max span for typical grade lumber, at typical spacings, for a 5psf dead load. While your ...


2

There might only be exposed nail heads at the end(s) of the ridge. The other nail heads should be covered by the adjacent ridge cap shingle, like this (from here): A professional would hide the last nail heads by gluing an end piece on like this: That seems like what you are describing. If so, there should be no nail heads exposed. If you paid for ...


3

The #10, #12 type numbers refer to the diameter of the screw. Larger numbers are bigger/thicker screw. Screws are sized by this diameter designation and also a length. You could take one or two out temporarily and carry them with you when you go to the store to buy the new screws. You can then easily compare to the new ones to find the correct size.



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