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62

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


25

I think you will just waste a lot of water compared to the cooling effect that you get. A better way to cool the roof is to change its color. A roof with a clean, smooth bright white surface can reflect about 85% of incident sunlight and emit thermal radiation with 90% efficiency. This surface will be only 9°F warmer than the outside air on a typical ...


19

I'm a contractor in Maine and we certainly have a lot of experience with ice dams. An ice dam can be the quickest way to force water under the roof shingles even on a roof in good shape. I have had mixed results with heat tapes. When they are used properly, they can be somewhat effective. Most folks expect to see a nice bare zig zag pattern along the edge ...


19

Given the choice, I'd put the ladder 2-3' to the side of the downspout. That should allow you to safely reach the downspout and a majority of the problem area without getting off the ladder. Using a stabilizer bar so that you aren't resting on the gutter helps: This also minimizes wear and tear on the shingles. If you do need to walk on the roof, stay ...


18

It turns out people have consumed rainwater for millions of years. So there's some precedent. This is very well covered online, so grab a search engine and get reading. Here's a summary of concerns. In the US, it may be illegal (look up "water rights") but for individual home use, that is usually ignored. You'll get a lot of water from your roof really ...


18

No. Layers of shingles on top of each other shorten the life of the roof due to the newest layer sitting on an uneven lower surfaces. The best life will come from removing all the old layers down to roof boards or sheathing and then laying down the new roof on a well repaired flat surface. Multiple layers of shingles happen because folks want to avoid ...


17

Trying to brace the roof from the outside as you illustrated will not add any significant structural reinforcement. Without the metal bands, the front and back walls carry the brunt of the lateral load that the roof places on the side walls. Adding straps that encircle the exterior will primarily reinforce the ends, and do little towards stabilizing the rest ...


17

Replace it now. Like TODAY. That's BAD. With that kind of bad shingle wear, your shingles are likely to create ice dams which will cause water to back up and leak through the roof, causing interior damage, compounding the cost. In the summer, the roof won't hold the water because it can't freeze, so the curls will only grab a very little water before ...


16

Sounds like you need a chimney cap These come in a variety of sizes and shapes. They keep out most rain and snow and, most importantly, animals. You should attach any cap with stainless screws and lead anchors. Sealant is not a big issue, since there is no need for air or water tight joints. While sealant might hold in most conditions, strong winds ...


15

You lose more heat through ceilings than through other surfaces (because the warm air is touching it, and because of good convection currents). The insulation value of glass is very low. To put it in USA terms, a single pane of glass is R-1, while many house walls are R-20 and ceilings R-30. I've seen superinsulated roofs at R-60. Even triple-pane glass is ...


14

It is common to lay up to three layers (at least in my area), but if the roof has lifting shingles laying another layer will just lift the new shingles. If the roof is bad, it is better and probably cheaper in the long run to remove the old shingles and lay the new ones fresh. If the roof is not that bad a second layer can definitely save money, just make ...


13

On shingles, look for shingles that might be broken, cracked, or missing, that are curled (no longer flat), and any that have lost their stone coating. The last two are important; this is the first sign of an impending roof failure and that your entire roof will shortly need to be replaced. If you have rubber seals around your vent stacks (between the ...


13

It could be that they are trying to slow down a fire from spreading. The material at the edges might be more fire resistant, so the fire will spread to adjacent buildings more slowly, allowing the occupants more time to escape. You might be able to verify this by checking the local fire codes for conjoined (not sure this is the right term) buildings. See ...


13

A If you choose B you will dimple the steel, ruining the look while creating a penetration point for water because expansion and contraction of the metal due to heating and cooling will create an open access point for water to enter, and a big opening behind it to receive it. A, however, will give you a tight seal against the wood, wood-steel-screw in a ...


12

As I mentioned in a comment to Jay's post, rainwater collecting may be illegal, dependent on your State. Western states, which get less rain, generally employ the doctrine of "prior appropriation"; an entity can claim the rights to water that will enter a waterway even if it hasn't arrived there yet. This means that by collecting rainwater into a cistern, ...


12

You have either, too flat of a pitch in your roof or installed your roof tiles incorrectly. Just accept it and move on. It's going to have to be redone. You would be wisest to tear it all out, then get someone who knows how to do it correctly in to do it. If you half-ass it now, it will just come back later, usually after causing structural damage for ...


11

I live in south texas, last week we had a terrible heat wave, temperatures outside where in the 110F-115F range, I installed a wireless thermometer on the attic and it read 130F on the hottest days. Ac would not cut off when set at 77. Went to home depot, got a set of 3 sprinklers that you can connect in series, I had an extra 24v solenoid water valve around ...


11

You could be risking damage to the foundation. It depends if the bed is properly graded or not. If the bed is graded properly, the water will run away from the house and the foundation. If not, the water could run towards the house. After a heavy rainfall, see if the foundation concrete close to the dirt looks wet. If it stays wet looking for long after the ...


11

Plywood absorbs water and is not a sealing material, period. You can use it as base for ruberoid roof, but not as the layer exposed to the rain. When exposed to rain, wind and sun plywood will cycle through absorbing water and drying out and this will wear out the most outer layer in no time so that it cracks and the damage then proceeds to the next layer ...


10

Twofold theory: Perhaps OSB is cheaper at the moment for this builder than ply and wants to use OSB as much as they can. OSB and Ply are apparently seen as the same in terms of performance and code see: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publications/by-title/choosing-between-oriented-strandboard-and-plywood/ However, OSB, when cut, is more susceptible to water ...


10

The same policy goes for roof sheathing as for hanging drywall, you get more strength by spanning more rafters/joists/studs and offsetting the joints. This solves two points of weakness. The main one is the structure turning into a parallelogram where the studs are no longer perpendicular to the ground. When you think of using a diagonal brace to support a ...


10

I wouldn't worry too much about it. The plywood is not typically supporting a load of more than the paper and asphalt shingles that were placed, even more so if you have a considerable pitch on your roof to where it would be difficult or impossible for a person to walk on. It basically serves so that you have something to nail the shingles down securely. ...


10

The best way is to go around the roof, not through it. As soon as you have a hole, you are providing a path for water. You can seal it, but it's always going to be a weak spot. Additionally, if you ever need to redo the roof, it will be a pain to deal with the wires that are now in the way. Better to come out of wall, then go up to the roof. You still ...


10

I would give your business to one of the "is good and stays dry" roofers who are not blatantly trying to fleece you. Now, the other two may be working from the assumption that if you bothered to call a roofer, you have leaks. But they strike me a lying scammers if they are selling you new plywood with no idea if the roof deck is rotten or solid. Plywood ...


9

Definitely replace the gutter. Not only are you risking damage to the foundation, but if there's any wind when it rains your walls and windows will receive much more water than they should. This can cause all sorts of other problems like rot, seepage, and suchlike.


9

You may have condensation running down the vent pipes into the fans; given how a vent pipe attaches to the back of a fan, the condensation will tend to run to the side(s) of the fan fixtures. Are the vent pipes uninsulated and in a cold space? Could condensation have frozen inside of the pipe, and then melted at the same time as the snow? Would the snow ...


9

It makes complete sense to replace your water heater early, because the failure mode for most of the older ones is "break and drain all over the inside of your house" -- and the 'drip pan' can only catch so much. You don't say where you're from, so I can't give you any climate or region-specific suggestions on what to replace and what not to replace. I ...


9

From somebody who has done this many times, occasionally for money Get help. You can set this up to look rock solid, but no matter how secure you think it is when climbing one wrong move and you're learning to fly in milliseconds. Having a trusted friend or family member hold the ladder at all times is the only way to make this as safe as possible. ...



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