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11

If you were framing this opening from the start, figure 1 is the way it would be done. I would go that direction so it will make sense to anyone working in this area of your home in the future. Did you consider the possibility of centering the new window horizontally in the existing opening? That may result in a better proportion. In that case I would still ...


10

I'll defer to the experts but personally, I wouldn't mix brands of chainsaw chains. I seem to recall that Stihl chain designs help reduce/prevent kick-back and binding (which presumably explains why they're more expensive). Plus, they use a green and yellow color-coding system to help you select a powerhead, bar and chain combination that complies with ...


8

Check your unit's warranty. The heat exchangers on some units are warranteed for 20 years or longer. You may be able to get at least some money from the manufacturer, or a credit toward a new unit of the same brand. They may also cover all or part of the installation labor. Find out whether there are any federal or state tax incentives that could help. A ...


8

DIY option: rent a skid steer scrape off existing driveway buy crushed rock spread with skid steer, rake rent a compacter and compact crushed rock layer bring in sand, spread, screed and level. buy concrete pavers start laying them depending on your age/health, buy lots of Advil Good luck!


7

Mixing brands of chains is no problem, provided you use compatible chains. I'm no longer able to buy "original" chains for my old Homelite so I buy it off the roll at the local mower/chainsaw dealer, who also joins it up for me. It's worth noting that this particular dealer won't sell you a chain unless you know exactly what to ask for or bring in an old one ...


7

A GFCI is a good idea because of the location of the outlet. However, I don't think that a GFCI that can simultaneously protect two circuits even exists (and I doubt one would fit into a single-gang box if it did exist), so I believe you have a couple of options: Install GFCI breakers on the dishwasher and disposal circuits, and use a regular outlet under ...


6

First, figure out the replacement cost. Based on that, figure out what you're willing to spend on keeping the old one running. Never call a technician unless it's still under warranty. Parts + Labour for one call can be up to half the price of a new machine. (This is not a slight against the technicians. They're entitled to a fair wage, and your 1 hour ...


6

Can I use an old aluminum road sign as a replacement floor for my hot water heater closet? I'm sorry, but that made me laugh. First thing you should do, is find what is causing the floor to rot and fix the leak. What is "spongy"? The floor or the joist? If the joists are rotten, you need to replace them, then put a new floor down. After you fix ...


5

Oregon (http://www.oregonchain.com/) makes chainsaw accessories, including chains that would fit my chainsaw. Stihl chains are pre-stretched, so you won't get as much initial stretch on the saw. I heard that Stihl chains are built to closer tolerances, but nothing authoritative. It looks like the Oregon chain needs a slightly different sized sharpening ...


5

Guardian is the manufacturer of the glass itself, but not the door assembly. See http://www.guardian.com/en/na/gd_002563.html I think the key to finding the proper sliding screen is going to be finding out the manufacturer of the assembly. Have you looked all around the door frame for a nameplate?


5

shirlock homes is correct. The facia boards should be underneath the drip edge and it will not be affected. I would go slow removing the facia boards in case the roofer inadvertently nailed the drip edge to the facia. The steps are simple: Remove facia using a cats paw or similar tool and a hammer. Remove all nails and/or screws that might get in the ...


5

Quick and dirty You could try some Fix-a-Flat. If nothing else, it might show you where the leak is. Finding the leak Pump the tires up and apply some soapy water to them, or hold them underwater in a large bucket. This will help you locate the leak(s). Plugging the hole If the leak is in the tread, you could try a tire repair kit like this If the ...


5

That piece looks to just be a single curve (bent in a single axis), so it's possible to do yourself, but it's not necessarily the easiest thing to do, and you can get some optical distortion depending on how evenly you flex it. If I were to do it, I'd do the following: Trace the inside contour onto a piece of wood. Make multiple wood pieces, slightly ...


5

I think your contractor is right on the money, it's way easier to approach the problem from above than below, and trying to fix it from below would be very difficult to do properly. Floors generally creak because the floor material isn't strongly connected to the joists, to when you step the joists rub against the subflooring , and the subflooring segments ...


4

You might want to look into some 3rd party retractable screen doors - there are a number of different manufacturers, and you can probably pick up a universal fit at your local home improvement store. I've seen a couple of these installed, and the good quality ones are pretty slick, and will handle kids & dogs - when hit, they simply retract. You should ...


4

I found this place on the net that has a lot of vintage plumbing. They had some green sinks and soap dishes and a pink toilet. I didn't see a green toilet, but it looks like they do a lot of salvage work and their inventory changes frequently. Might be worthwhile to drop them an e-mail and have them notify you if one comes in. Historic House Parts Also, ...


4

Dirty filters not only make the HVAC equipment not last as long, but the low air flow makes them less energy efficient. A dirty furnace does not conduct heat into the air as well and the dirt sticks to the fan blades making it not last as long or spin as easily. There are two main types of air filters: The 1" thick ones that look like this: And the 6" ...


4

Honestly, It can be a giant pain in the butt. You start with covering it with a thick blanket or two and smashing it with a sledgehammer to bust it up into pieces (yeah, that's really how it's done). The blanket is to prevent getting yourself cut up by flying pieces of cast iron and porcelain. You might also have to bust out the tile/brickwork as well, ...


4

I'm assuming here that they're not going to replace the ducts in the wall; if I'm wrong I'll adjust my answer accordingly. Cut three or four pieces of 2x4's long enough to fit between the studs at the sides of the hole. Toe nail or screw one in horizontally near the top of the hole, one at the bottom and the other one or two in the middle. Provided your ...


4

You say you'll be removing the old lock, so why not replace the mortise locks and if you buy 5 or 7 lever ones they'll be more secure than the bored cylindrical lock. Make sure you buy one with the handle spindle in the same position as the old lock. When it comes to the door jamb, a lot of mortise locks have a "box keep" rather than just a plate defining ...


4

I had basically the same situation in my 70's-built house, the closet doors went all the way to the roof, and were horrible looking bi-folds. Basically what I did is framed in a header to bring the opening to 81" (remember to account for 1/2" drywall while framing): Then some drywall and paint (note I didn't yet repaint the ceiling in this picture): ...


4

Ah, the wonders of carpet ... The answer is that you would be able to replace the carpet in that area, typically seamlessly, if you have more of the same carpet, such as remnants that the installers left in your attic or garage. If you don't have more of the SAME carpet -- as in, same batch, same manufacturing date, same everything -- then you will end up ...


4

You're probably fine with the larger diameter (I wouldn't go smaller), but I would install a damper where you tie into the main trunk and then have someone come and rebalance the system using flow meters. That way a professional can optimize your entire house so that the air entering each room is the same relative to it's size and heat load, and the house ...


4

That unit is already 18 years old which means it's approaching its end of life. Even if you did repair the heat exchanger, you'd likely have to replace it soon anyways. With old stuff, it just always seems to be one thing after another. Assuming its not covered by warranty, then yes I think the contractors advice to replace it with a new unit is correct. ...


4

Pretty much anyone can demo a roof. Now it might take you a ton of time if you don't have the right tools but its not rocket science. There is a lot of trash so you need to get a dumpster. Laying new felt or paper is pretty easy too. But at the same time this isn't something you would get charged a ton of money for and if a crew was doing your roof ...


3

We have several "ReStore"s in my area that have old building materials that people have donated. I always see old turquoise, coral, powder blue, ... sinks, toilets, etc. there. I imagine you can find something similar in your area to browse.


3

I would suggest you use the method in figure 1. It is conventional, easier and uses less material.


3

The rule of thumb is every 3 months but it does depend on the filter and your air quality. And yes, if you don't keep the filter clean it will shorten the life of your unit and could cause other problems like a frozen coil (where the air handler coil freezes because there isn't enough airflow). I like to use the cheap air filters as they allow the best ...


3

My wife restored an old clawfoot tub in our 130 year old home. It's beautiful, and as tub experiences go, we wouldn't dream of replacing it with a "modern" shallow plastic or acryllic excuse for a tub. These tubs are irreplaceable. Try changing your perspective, find the beauty in the thing, and maybe, just maybe, you'll spare yourself a whole bunch of ...



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