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Your picture shows parts that are for a knob style handle. You say you changed to a lever handle which should use a cam with a rounded triangular hole rather than the pictured "slot style" cam. Also, the ball for lever handles is different than that for knobs. It has a slot in the side of the ball that engages with a small pin which protrudes from the right ...


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I am sure that this can be fixed with a thread locker material. There are products available that can be placed onto threads before assembly and then will cure into a very tight joint to keep the threaded fasteners from coming loose. You can get this at almost any auto parts store. Ask them for "loctite" thread locker. Before trying to use it clean out ...


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First I would determine how old the siding is. If made in the last 20 years it's probably covered by manufacturer warranty and replacing it with vinyl would be a step backwards. Also lap siding isn't supposed to seal on the bottom. It's supposed to allow any moisture or condensation that happens to get under the boards to drain downwards. So you should ...


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This is a tough one. Very odd to have that "cube" adjacent to the tub with a cabinet so close. The cabinet should have been pushed up against the tub and the cube/cabinet gap bridged, waterproofed, and tiled, so there would be no gap. If the problem were just aesthetic I would say use some porcelain repair, it comes in a bottle with a paintbrush type ...


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That looks suspiciously like somebody decided to cut a door through the wall and either gave up or decided it was too much work. The wall construction looks like veneer plaster, which would fit with the age of the house. Whatever method you decide to use, you're going to have to get some more framing in there. You at very least would need to replace the ...


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They chew, rather determinedly. Keeping them out when they want in is no small task, indeed. One approach with moderate success is to cover the opening with hardware cloth (heavy wire mesh) molded to fit and nailed carefully in place, and then spray foam. Board over the top if you like for appearances sake. The missing wood may well have been chewed away ...


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In addition to @Tester101's advice about clean joints, you also need tight joints. In general, most glues need to be squeezed to a very thin layer to obtain maximum strength. In many new chairs, there is cut in the end of the stretcher tenon. A very thin wooden wedge is coated with glue and is driven in that cut to expand the end of the tenon and lock it ...


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The last time you glued them, did you clean the joint and make sure all the old glue was gone? Wood glues (e.g. Elmer's) require a clean wood to wood joint, and don't bond well to old glue, stained wood, or finished wood. You might want to try a polyurethane glue (e.g. Gorilla Glue), as these will bond to a variety of surfaces. They also expand a bit, and ...


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I'd suggest searching the web for Amica maintenance instructions for your model. If there are recalibrations available at all, that's where you'll find the instructions. Normally, a service tech would just swap out the electronics and/or sensor, since if it's drifted this far there's no guarantee that it won't do other Bad Things some time soon.


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I would use a setting joint compound (maybe durabond) rather than mud because it's more durable and moisture resistant. It's more time-consuming to sand, however. Either should stick to concrete and both should get a coat of primer before painting. If have old or really glossy concrete, you can prep the surface with a little Muriatic acid to etch the ...


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I would not hesitate to skim over clean dry concrete with drywall mud. As long as the concrete NEVER has a chance to get wet.


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I decided to go ahead and buy a replacement gearbox. Testing the new gearbox before I installed it, I determined that the answer to my question is yes, my test does mean that the gearbox is bad. With the new gearbox, I was not able to spin the input shaft and hold the output shaft still at the same time. I installed the new gearbox, and now the washer ...


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Without a picture it is a little hard to say. Depending on the depth you may need to do one or both. If the depth is shallow simply sand and refinish the spot (it will not look like new and particularly in certain light you will definitely always be able to see the spot). If the scratches/gouges are deeper you will have to sand, fill, sand, then ...


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After a bit of research it turns out that washing machine gearboxes are quite the complicated beast and have vastly varying designs. Without knowledge of the internal workings, it's hard to say if this is normal behavior. Other methods for determining if a gearbox is bad include: Checking for excessive play on the input and output shafts, which would ...


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Check or replace your gas cap. Looks like it is not venting properly. Try it with the gas cap loose or adjust it occasionally while mowing.


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I see in the bottom picture, the bottom is a tilt in sash, easy to remove. The top sash CAN be made a tilt in, it is missing the ballasts that keep it from dropping. It is now held in place by a metal or plastic clip that holds it in place. Find these, remove them and the sash will drop, and therefore, able to be removed. I see a screw visible near the tilt ...


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Yes there is a rapid set thinset, big box stores have it. Fortified thinset that you have is good stuff, I used it in all my install for my bath renovations. 2 days time is not enough time for thinset to get a strong bond, enough to step on but easy to pull, any longer you would have had a tougher time. The amount of thinset you use is crucial, it has to be ...


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I would use a knife grade epoxy, activator and black dye. Probably have to order these online since stores hardly carry these things. After you are done just give it a light sanding with angle grinder and diamond flap disc.



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