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1

Remove the whole tile, like gbronner suggests, or cut a tiny one to fit. Back-fill the hole with newspaper, or better yet something not flammable, like fiberglass insulation. Thinset the new tile in place and prop it to the wall with a broom or something so it doesn't fall out. Use tile spacers, or tooth picks, to keep it from slumping down. I'd like to hope ...


1

Yank the anchor and fill with silicone caulk or epoxy. Matching color is probably impossible. If you have an extra tile from the same batch, you can carefully cut the grout lines, pry off the tile, and replace, it, but that's a lot more work.


1

You may be able to find some NOS (new old stock) pulls of the same type on eBay or Etsy. I recently did the same thing for an old writing desk that was missing one of the pulls. I couldn't find a match for the missing one, so I replaced the whole set. If you want them repaired, then they will probably need to be brazed and re-tapped. That is a job that you ...


2

Another traditional approach to reinforcing cracked wood is to install a "butterfly key" (also known as "bowtie key"). This is essentially an inlaid piece that acts as a pair of dovetail joints to tie the two sides together. Keys can be as larger or small as desired, in similar wood or contrasting wood ... the latter is a bit more common since the key's ...


0

1/4" steel flat stock, one under each end, cut to width. With counter sunk holes for short, pan-head lag screws. Fancy installations will have an area routed for this piece, making it flush to the surface. Ideally it runs under the legs, sharing two out of the four fasteners per leg. Sort of like this:


5

The attached pieces and legs may have exacerbated the effects by not moving with the seat but a piece of pine of that size was probably destined to crack regardless. You can try to weep glue down into it (run a line of yellow glue over the crack then blow it down into the void with an air nozzle) and then clamp out the space but it probably won't be ...


1

If it were me I'd hit it with a dye stain first to help color the scratches but this takes a light touch and a bit of experimenting to get the tone right. If the marks disappear with a little oil you can probably just apply (after a good cleaning with Murphy's Oil Soap) a light coat of linseed or tung oil, followed by a reapplication of whatever poly was ...


0

If your insurance company gave you money to repair a plaster ceiling with drywall - they are probably just trying to get of as cheap as possible, and hoping to get away with it. Joining the two systems together or even replacing the entire ceiling with drywall - is usually much more labor intensive, than just plastering the damaged section and blending it ...


0

Fasten it to the floor. A table designed like this really needs to be secured. Remove the table from its base and attach it to the floor joists with brackets, from the inside (find those joists or it may pull up the flooring). Unless you're going to bevel-in a removable decorative center piece (to allow access inside the pillar and a means to attach the top) ...


1

If the base is hollow and open at the bottom, I would try making it slide around something heavy. Make a concrete block or something that will fit fairly tightly inside the base. Make it a bit shorter than the base to ensure the table goes all the way to the floor. Then when you setup the table you sit the block on the floor, lift up the table and slide ...


3

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


0

Solutions in which the table cannot easily move: Make a base plate, as you suggest. But route out a section of your floor and make the base plate closely resemble the floor, then set the whole thing into the routed-out hole. Get several L-shaped brackets and use them to bolt the table to the floor. Ugly. Make the base hollow with a secretly removable ...


0

Give the area a wipe over so it's slightly damp, then with a very fine paint brush trace the circle with a very fine line of household bleach. Once the stain has faded quickly remove all of the bleach. You may then need to re oil the area.


0

Drilling out the holes is easier than it sounds if you can live with holes on the outside of your furniture. Just dry-fit the pieces together and drill new holes for the screws from the outside. Make sure you move away from the old crumbled holes. Then you can measure and drill for the cam hole, using a fat drill bit instead of a spade bit because the point ...


0

Toss the cams and use good quality wood glue. Use clamps to hold the pieces together until the glue cures and use screws with an aggressive coarse thread. You will need to drill pilot holes for the screws, and you will never be able to disassemble, but once the particle board is damaged as described it is very difficult to repair.


1

Dig out the bad/loose stuff. Fill with an epoxy based filler (such as Bondo). Redrill the holes. Reinsert the cam bolts. Product references are for illustration only and not an endorsement


1

I had the same issue with my saw and traced the problem down to the switch. Pulled it apart and found the contacts had burnt out due to over heating. $14.00 fix by replacing the switch.


1

I consider myself more than handy and I would still hire carpet guys for a new instillation (if for some reason I wanted installed carpet). You ever use one of those knee things? pfft. You are however, looking at a carpet repair. So long as you don't over cut the carpet, you can give it a go. Call guys in if you have unsatisfactory results. Consider dong ...


0

It sounds to me like you have a loose neutral wire, I would recommend turning off the main breaker followed immediately by all of the other breakers. Then call an electrician. While the electrician is on their way unplug all sensitive electronics. The reason for this near paranoia like response is that there is a possibility of devices getting a full ...


3

No that quote is too high, especially the 300 side of the quote. You are paying a company, not the installer who gets less than half of that. You should seek out an installer and be able to get that done for ~100, which is reasonable. Doing the job yourself will be a little more difficult than you might want to get involved in. First you need to get the ...


0

I suggest scraping using stripper to minimize the fallout rather than adjusting the door, especially if it's in good alinement. Old doors like where they are. Safely remove lead paint, Department of Health, Paraphrased: Be a non pregnant adult. Tarp everything. Wear an approved respirator. Clean up carefully. Do not eat, drink or smoke before you throw ...


3

In almost all cases its better to move or adjust the strike plate, the stop, or both rather than move the hinges. Here's a series of diagrams that demonstrate why (dimensions are exaggerated for effect) : This is an ideal door set up. The gap between the door and the stop is an even 1/32 to 1/16 all the way around. It is not supposed to be tight to the ...


2

Moving hinges are not an easy task. Moving the hinges 1/8 of a inch will require repairing the old screw holes first. To repair the old holes you will need to fill them with suitable filler that will hold the screws. My preference is to wood dowels and wood glue. With a thin layer of glue o the dowel, tap it in the old screw hole. Let cure (look on ...



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