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They chew, rather determinedly. Keeping them out when they want in is no small task, indeed. One approach with moderate success is to cover the opening with hardware cloth (heavy wire mesh) molded to fit and nailed carefully in place, and then spray foam. Board over the top if you like for appearances sake. The missing wood may well have been chewed away ...


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In addition to @Tester101's advice about clean joints, you also need tight joints. In general, most glues need to be squeezed to a very thin layer to obtain maximum strength. In many new chairs, there is cut in the end of the stretcher tenon. A very thin wooden wedge is coated with glue and is driven in that cut to expand the end of the tenon and lock it ...


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The last time you glued them, did you clean the joint and make sure all the old glue was gone? Wood glues (e.g. Elmer's) require a clean wood to wood joint, and don't bond well to old glue, stained wood, or finished wood. You might want to try a polyurethane glue (e.g. Gorilla Glue), as these will bond to a variety of surfaces. They also expand a bit, and ...


1

I'd suggest searching the web for Amica maintenance instructions for your model. If there are recalibrations available at all, that's where you'll find the instructions. Normally, a service tech would just swap out the electronics and/or sensor, since if it's drifted this far there's no guarantee that it won't do other Bad Things some time soon.


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I would use a setting joint compound (maybe durabond) rather than mud because it's more durable and moisture resistant. It's more time-consuming to sand, however. Either should stick to concrete and both should get a coat of primer before painting. If have old or really glossy concrete, you can prep the surface with a little Muriatic acid to etch the ...


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I would not hesitate to skim over clean dry concrete with drywall mud. As long as the concrete NEVER has a chance to get wet.


2

I decided to go ahead and buy a replacement gearbox. Testing the new gearbox before I installed it, I determined that the answer to my question is yes, my test does mean that the gearbox is bad. With the new gearbox, I was not able to spin the input shaft and hold the output shaft still at the same time. I installed the new gearbox, and now the washer ...


1

Without a picture it is a little hard to say. Depending on the depth you may need to do one or both. If the depth is shallow simply sand and refinish the spot (it will not look like new and particularly in certain light you will definitely always be able to see the spot). If the scratches/gouges are deeper you will have to sand, fill, sand, then ...


3

After a bit of research it turns out that washing machine gearboxes are quite the complicated beast and have vastly varying designs. Without knowledge of the internal workings, it's hard to say if this is normal behavior. Other methods for determining if a gearbox is bad include: Checking for excessive play on the input and output shafts, which would ...


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Check or replace your gas cap. Looks like it is not venting properly. Try it with the gas cap loose or adjust it occasionally while mowing.


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I see in the bottom picture, the bottom is a tilt in sash, easy to remove. The top sash CAN be made a tilt in, it is missing the ballasts that keep it from dropping. It is now held in place by a metal or plastic clip that holds it in place. Find these, remove them and the sash will drop, and therefore, able to be removed. I see a screw visible near the tilt ...


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Yes there is a rapid set thinset, big box stores have it. Fortified thinset that you have is good stuff, I used it in all my install for my bath renovations. 2 days time is not enough time for thinset to get a strong bond, enough to step on but easy to pull, any longer you would have had a tougher time. The amount of thinset you use is crucial, it has to be ...


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I would use a knife grade epoxy, activator and black dye. Probably have to order these online since stores hardly carry these things. After you are done just give it a light sanding with angle grinder and diamond flap disc.


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It looks like EIFS, Exterior Insulation Finish System, placed over a pink sheet of fiberglass foundation drain board. EIFS is not made to go at or below grade. I am not a pro of this material, but I have never seen it applied over a fiberglass sheet. There was a post I answered sometime back, about how to repair EIFS that I did not format properly and still ...


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Just had a similar problem on a similar mower, True-Value rather than Craftsman. Fixed it. Turned out the safety interlock cable (AKA driver presence control bar cable) had stretched a bit, and the switch it controls had gotten just dirty enough, that when the mower heated up, contact would be lost and the motor would die. There was no easy way to adjust ...


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Use masking tape to label the conditioner's connections to the board made w red/blue wirenuts before you take them apart. A simple 1 to 4 -> left to right will keep you from swapping around by accident. It wouldn't hurt to mark one of the plugin connectors with a sharpy either.


1

Indeed, it does look like a "Guard, Door Switch", part number 8064187. See item 336 on page 6 of this. Unfortunately, that diagram does not show how it is assembled. It does show that it goes roughly at the top of the opening, just like you suspected.


2

This is really impossible to answer without opening it up more. But basically it depends on the damage already done. What you really need to do is clean this shower (bleach) and take out any loose pieces. And let it sit for a week. Also try to keep the humidity in the room low too. If nothing grows back and your tiles are structurally bonding you can ...


2

Expanding foam such as Great Stuff would work fine.


3

First, be wary of the two big capacitors. One is the large "beer-can"-shaped component against the inside wall of the enclosure, and the other is the smaller, silver oval-shaped can right next to it. These can hold electrical charge, and could hurt you. You'll want make sure that they're discharged. Once you unplug the unit, wait a few minutes for the ...


1

It looks like all the wires have connectors on them, so nothing crazy like soldering will be required. Compare the old board and the new board to make sure that all of the connections have the same labels, and label all the wires accordingly. Just make sure the power to everything is turned off and go for it.


2

This is the same as removing any in-wall cabinet or shelving. Drywall repair really isn't a big deal. Any kind of cover panel is going to raise questions about why access is needed at that point, and "because I didn't want to deal with drywall" is probably not going to be very convincing to the prospective buyer. Frankly, if you really hate the idea of ...


1

Silicone caulk would probably work the best with moisture and temp changes. You need to figure out how to push it up on the back side.


0

Personally I would just redo the drywall there. But you can get a piece of plywood, trim to size of hole. Use some window/door casing to cover the transition from wall to plywood.


5

Just put a piece of drywall in and give it a first coat of mud and tape. Seriously this is 10 minutes and no mess. Big box sells little kits for $10 or less for stuff like this. Then when you get around to selling no one will really mind a little patchwork to do in closet.


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I just used a regular Pledge furniture oil spray, nothing special. It just wiped off nicely. Some of the color did come up but not much; it looks fine and feels clean. Try it in an inconspicuous place first, it worked great for me.



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