Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

This is amusing. No, I cannot think of how a hair dryer could be used as the key diagnostic tool in determining a refrigerant leak in a refrigerator. That said, I have used a hair dryer on several occasions to accelerate removal of ice where a "frostless" fridge had a malfunctioning defrost cycle and ice had accumulated on the coils. Certain vintage GE ...


2

If you were to cut this down, it may not only be bad for yourself, but your neighbors that are on the same sewer system (assuming this isn't for a septic tank). Your options include landscaping (plantings in the middle of the yard are common, particularly with a focal tree or flower bed), fake rocks, concealing inside of a bird bath or sundial stand, ...


4

Cutting it off is a bad idea. Aborting the "process of buying" that you're in might be worth considering if it bothers you that much. Relocating it significantly would probably require significantly relocating the septic system, which is very expensive - so you might consider it a "deal-breaker." As for the location in the center of the yard, simply change ...


0

Just for future reference. The Compressor has 2 winding's, a Run winding and a Start winding, the Common terminal is the point at which both of the compressor winding's connect, thus the "Common" designation. For example,say you read 3 ohms resistance for your Run winding (Common to Run), and you read 5 ohms resistance for your Start winding (Common to ...


0

For god's sake don't go near that stuff (draughtex). We got a couple of rolls to try it. It looks awful, takes a ton of time to out in and it gave me nightmares about being a huge fire risk so I ripped it out quickly and then went back and filled the gaps with a mix of sawdust and rubber glue and the stain that coloured the floor. Got into quite an effective ...


4

It looks like a tamper-resistant hex screw. There are specific wrenches for these. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


2

Yes, that should be either plugged, or plumbed as a secondary drain. A 3/4" MNPT plug should do the trick.


0

I second what the 1st comment said. You should contact the manufacturer to see what lubricants would be safe for your equipment. You might have plastic parts in the cylinder that require you to use silicone, but to be sure, go to the manufacturer website, or consult your manual. About one side getting relaxed, you might have a leak somewhere, you might want ...


0

The most common reason for this is a bad lid switch. The drain function is part of the spin cycle, which will not start unless the lid switch closes a circuit to indicate that the lid is closed. If you are reasonably handy you can jumper the switch to prove this out. Since you already replaced the pump (which, by the way, would be the second most common ...


2

yes. screw it back into place. Use truss-head type screws rated for exterior use. Truss screws have a round very flat head. Drill pilot holes to fasten to frame beneath. Start your repair in the center of the loosened panel; working outwards in each direction. This will decrease the chance of the panel becoming distorted. Apply 100% silicone along underside ...


0

It is possible to do this, although I think it might be easier to cut the waste line on the horizontal run and plumb up another pipe upon which to install a toilet flange after the new floor is installed. If you are installing tile, the flange should go OVER the tile, for proper height of flange to toilet seal. Secondly, I would use nails or structural ...


1

Since I can see holes in the pan that look like they were used for installation purposes - nail holes. - An absolute certainty of failure - Tear the whole shower out. Save yourself money in the long run. I have replaced showers that are only 4 or 5 years old with small penetrations in the pan which caused major water damage to structural members. If those ...


0

It should not take more than a couple of hours. If it still doesn't work, you can remove the cover off the evaporator in the back of your freezer and check to be sure. Your evaporator blower may also have stopped working, or the motor may be so weak it isn't moving air properly.


0

Had the same problem in my 1998 Whirlpool. It was a broken plastic spin switch. A new one costs $50, I was told. It sits below the hole in the lower right corner of the top of the washer. That plastic finger in the lid fits in the hole and turns on the switch when lid is down. Repairer offered to wire around the switch. Now lifting the hood, won't stop ...


5

What about if you used a screw-on hose bib anti-siphon adapter. You could screw/jam it on along with a generous amount of 2-part epoxy putty (like J.B. Weld) and have new garden hose threads... and anti-siphon protection as a bonus!


0

I have just talked to a Moen Dealer about this problem and I am going to home depot to get a full credit back today. I didn't even need a receipt they are aware of a problem from a couple of years back and have since repaired it.\


0

Leaving this as an answer with trepidation and the hope that a real tile expert will chime in. My guess is that they're limestone or travertine. If you have spares, grind/smash/pulverize them to dust, mix that with a 2 part epoxy and fill 'er up. (Same for the broken chips at the door -- glue them solidly down with granite-safe adhesive and fill the cracks ...



Top 50 recent answers are included