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1

Even if you offered me the plastic brackets to install so I could cheat and run away, I might encourage you to use something METAL that you won't call me back for, breaking again. For these types or repairs I don't bother to find the original plastic hardware. Any hardware store will have what will fix this for the life of the cabinet: (amazon.com) ...


1

You may be able to find metal replacement boots from the manufacturer but it might be easiest to add some blocking as suggested by RedGrittyBrick. If that's the path you take I would suggest creating a vertical standard as opposed to horizontal applied blocking because it bears the weight of the drawer down into the floor of the cabinet instead of relying on ...


1

new-work Halo cans are adjustable to accommodate different ceiling height. Remove the reflector trim and the lamp. Then remove the three sheet metal screws from near the bottom of the can. Slowly work the can down and out. There is enough slack in the jacketed cable to let the can hang about six inches below the ceiling. Reach through the hole and unclip ...


0

Interesting problem, I encountered something similar and will relate it as it might be something to look into: The client complaint was intermittent shutdown of gas burner and pilot, requiring the client to re-light the pilot light. I discovered that, occasionally, when the thermostat called for the gas valve to open gas to the main burner, the pilot flame ...


1

Given "I drained the whole system" I'd suspect a trapped air bubble first and foremost. Try bleeding again. The bubble may be trapped in the pipe rather than the radiator itself - look for bleeders along the pipes. Alternatively there may be a valve you've missed, or an actual bit of debris plugging the radiator (a pretty distant third place, in my ...


1

Frankly, replacing one horizontal run like that probably isn't worth the effort, unless there will be lots of rain in the future. It may well be sufficient to strip, putty the gaps, caulk the edges, and paint. Otherwise, you'll have to replace the siding panel. Remove the bench and wall. Remove the siding, and renew. The tools and materials are ...


0

It also could be as simple as the door safety switch.


0

First thing is to try and remedy the situation. Adding finish to one side has caused an imbalance in the woods ability to absorb and release ambient moisture, causing it to twist. If at all possible pull up the offending members and oil the underside as well to help mitigate this affect. Once that's done reset your base moulding by shooting finish nails ...


1

Bring in an engineer. The termite inspector's job is to tell you that there is damage and where. The engineer's job is to tell you how that affects the building and what can be done about it. (A home inspector likewise is generally tasked with pointing out what's an issue rather than telling you how big an issue it is, though you can sometimes read between ...


1

Before I suggest how to investigate your problem, my guess is that one (or more) of the concrete blocks with a post/pier that is supporting a joist or beam has settled. The solution to this can range from removing the flooring in a small section and resetting the block, to realizing that all of the blocks are out of whack and maybe the ground the building is ...


0

You can rip up the subfloor and replace it all, or you can use a leveling compound (Similar to concrete) to get your floor much more level. Neither option requires getting under the structure, but both will involve floor destruction.


0

Purchase 14" x 6' length of shower liners. It comes in 6' widths so you have to buy the 6' but it only takes 14" to wrap around the pipe. If the section of the damage is smaller than 14", then you could buy a smaller piece. At my plumbing store it is sold by the square ft. for $2. So, for the piece that I stated at the beginning, it cost me $7. Then ...


1

FYI: A neighbor (in the physical world) wondered by and had the perfect tool. Expanded details: https://ello.co/cwhii/post/W6vBG5nnYlOSFK6ciW0SBw


2

Mazura's answer describes the best solutions. But if there really is only 0.33" inside the pipe and part of the broken pipe remnant is protruding from the intact pipe, you might be able to manage without special tools if you take a slim metal-cutting hacksaw blade and carefully saw a channel all the way through the wall of the pipe fragment, parallel to ...


4

Screw Extractor: (cromwell.co.uk, #3 is what you need, I think. Finding them at a real store and comparing actual sizes might help) For larger sizes, use an Internal Pipe Wrench: (plumbingsupply.com)


0

I don't know about their cut-out method being bunk, but don't try to call them 6 years from now and complain, either. If ceramic tile and a porcelain tub were part of the $3500 quote we may have something there. Correctly installed, it will last the rest of your life. What's the rush? If you live there (and plan to for the foreseeable future) don't you ...


2

I know nothing about this concrete thing, but I don't see how that would be an improvement over just cutting away the bulge and then dropping in the insert... and if you're concerned about what's supporting the tub, I'd suggest the right answer is to pull the whole thing, examine/reconstruct that appropriately, and put a new tub in. STRONG recommendation to ...


1

$3500 sounds like a lot to pull out a fiber glass tub surround (assuming there's no structural damage), you can get a replacement shell for about $500 and it's a days work to replace tops (plus paint touch up if any). In fact, now that I think about it, my mother just had a tub/shower unit replaced in one of her rentals and it cost $2200 and that involved ...


-1

Sounds like the magnetron is faulty. Remove it and use a multimeter to test between one pin and the body and then also test from the second pin to the body of the magnetron. If there is resistance , change it. They are cheap on eBay . The fuse from the large capacitor to the large transformer is usually blown as well. Good luck


0

Applying heat directly to silicone caulking will soften it up and could cause it to lose its adherence to the surface. Heating silicone aids in removal.


0

My daughter in law had the same problem and it was that her dry well was full of lint from years of use. We installed a sump to the town sewer line instead.



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