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thanks for the suggestion but I think i'm going to give replastering a shot with the mix i have and some metal lath. i'm looking at getting into a bunch of plaster work as i go room by room and i might as well dig in and see how it turns out.


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I highly recommend not attempting to repair the drill yourself. These are expensive, complex devices that are easy to break if you are not trained in how to repair them. Look up authorized repair centers for your brand of drill (Bosch, in this case) and ask for a quote. From there you will need to decide if it is better to repair or to replace the drill: ...


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I've had this same problem before and found it difficult to find replacement material that matches. In Texas it rains heavy and the high humidity keeps these surfaces wet. If the rot is low enough to the floor, run a chalk line across horizontally. Cut of the rot with a circular saw,(adjust the depth of the blade so it doesn't cut the 2x4 wall behind) then ...


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First I would not paint it unless you start noticing a little rust. Better to give it an inspection every once in a while. If you do paint it, I would go with an automotive engine enamel. (it requires a long dry time)


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What I have done on my 1909 house (I am in the U.S.) in the same exact situation is clear a wider area of the lath and plaster and replace it with drywall. To do that, you will need to add some padding over the studs because the lath&plaster is thicker than 1/2" -- what I did was pad it with 3/8" plywood, then drywall over plywood to achieve ...


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after replastering the damaged wall, you can use water-proof paint to protect the plaster. The items and materials used in bathroom and kitchen should be anti-moisture.


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Most anything can be repaired with enough time, money, materials and skill. Sheetrock, however, is one of the cheapest building materials we use, so when it comes to repairing wall and ceiling surfaces, typically the cheapest/easiest solution is to just re-sheetrock.


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I have a similar problem, but worse. I think im going to put concrete backer board, like what they use to tile bathrooms, on the outside of the edge of the porch, then cover it up with the morter you see covering the edge of your concrete already. To attach it, ill drill holes and use anchor nails or screws and adhesive.


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I agree that the best solution here is tell your landlord, provided you have a reasonable one. What does your lease say about routine maintenance? Chances are if you weren't doing chinups on it, you shouldn't be charged. However, if you've had a previous experience with this landlord in which they've proved to be unreasonable, you could attempt to fix it ...


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Sad to say, the pot-metal piece attached to the wall broke, and it's likely hard to find the right replacement part. The proper person to call in a case like this is your landlord. If it broke without unreasonable force, you should not be charged. The landlord owns the property and has the right to choose the time and manner of repair (she/he may not want ...


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Shirlock's advice is good but I want to add a few things: You need to regrade plus move spout out. However I think you have more than a standing water problem. The water damage is pretty high up and it is pointing me to thinking that your gutters are not functioning . I think your flashing may not be tucked over the gutters or something else. We don't ...


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I am going to guess this picture is taken looking down onto the top of the lower sash of a double hung window? The wood I see at the bottom of the picture is the wood flooring a number of feet lower? If so you can drill out the pop rivets on both halves of the sash lock and replace both halves with a new unit that resembles yours as close a possible. They ...


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I see that you have posted two questions about this situation. I fear you have to address a couple of problems here. First and foremost is to try to route water away from this area. We can address this in another segment with more info on the area in question. As far as the immediate problem, I am pretty sure you will have to remove the damaged sections of ...


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Hi There is also a rubber tube type floor filler that will expand and contract as your floor moves in the different temperatures of the seasons http://www.draughtex.co.uk/ It is in the UK but they ship world wide.


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Remove the tank, re-dope the pipe or wrap it in teflon tape, and reconnect the tank. You'll want to shut the water off first as gregmac aptly suggested; ideally there is a shutoff valve on both sides of the tank, otherwise the water in your house will drain out at low pressure. If you only have one, you'll want to relieve the downstream pipes of water ...


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How about replacing the strips of hardwood you removed? This is an easy project for any finishing carpenter and most general handymen. You could either try to match the rest of the flooring—which isn't that hard. Or us a dark wood, maybe dark stained wood for some contrast.


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As a home inspector, I can tell you that sheer existence of those damaged joists are going to be a RED FLAG at any time you decide to sell and move on. If they are badly burned, they are not structurally sound and should be removed. Install a few temp supports on ends of adjacent joists, then remove and replace them one or two at a time. Use proper joist ...


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Fine if you leave them just consider covering burner or smoked wood with a kilz primer for no after smell or effects.


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Easy fix AND very permanent would be using a longer screw in one or two holes or the stripped holes. Fine thread #8 3" long with Phillips head. Drive through Hinge hole completely through jamb into the framing. Do not over tighten paint screw head to match if necessary.


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Buy a small bag of concrete floor patch: it mixes like pancake batter and sets a light gray. This is what you fill that gap with. It gets hard as concrete and will adhere to the existing stone. If you don't want it to stick to the wood then mask off the wood before. It also helps to protect the top of the wood with masking tape. If you need more of a curb ...


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That spring is definitely broken. It sits in the square bracket and pushes against the lever above it. Do you have another working handle that you can disassemble to compare to?


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I'd use veneer plaster. Your instinct about joint compound and spackling is on target, and you might get Plaster of Paris to work if you get the mix perfect - but why bother. My guess is that the people you've been talking to at hardware stores either don't have a clue what you are looking for or want to direct you to something in stock. I'd check at a ...


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I managed to get it looking good by filling the holes with paint and passing the brush over it a couple of times after it was painted, while drying. The fiberglass glued to the wall. Hope it helps someone!


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The location of the drywall cracks would be important relative to the removed wall and the foundation cracking. Structural walls are often removed in remodels but with a load bearing beam of some type spanning the new open space and transferring the load to either side. That is one good reason to look at permits with the county or city to see if there was a ...


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The relevant professional are structural engineer or civil engineer. Internet advice cannot suffice for a complex matter like cracking or settling, especially if there is a chance a structural wall was removed in a multistory home. You should start by getting a copy of all relevant permits at the building department and taking photos to document the ...



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