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8

You've already let out the magic smoke (refrigerant). It's not enough to just fix the tubing, you have to replace the refrigerant. This isn't something you can do yourself. You'll have to call a refrigerator repair service that is qualified to work with refrigerant. Note that the cost of repair may exceed the replacement cost of the freezer.


0

Flip it, drill new holes for hinges and hanging and then patch ,sand,and stain the damaged side so looks good as the face to ur cabinet. Then it will at least durable not delicate ? => idk just a thought thank you


0

Tap a plastic wall plug into the hole, the sort you'd normally use in brick or concrete walls, or a screw in wall plug if it's a cavity wall.


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I used the plastic wall plugs you'd normally use for brick or concrete walls, it worked perfectly, you need quite a small size so it fits into the existing hole, tap them in lightly with a hammer then screw hinge back on, they expand so should keep the hole plugged securely, You could put a drop of glue in the hole first, but I thought about that afterwards ...


-1

It is not much more work nor much more expensive to purchase a new door w/door knob hole and the hinge reliefs routed. If your measurements are accurate and precise, and the fabrication of the new door is true to the demensions of the existing door, maybe $45 for the cheapest hollow door to $175 for a solid wood one, and all hinges are prwciarly set so that ...


2

It looks like it will press right back into place, so it really comes down to what type of glue to use, and how to clamp. Here's what I would do: Choose a glue: Any normal PVA ("wood glue") should be fine. Superglue might be quicker, but it can be fussy, so practice with it on another piece of wood if you go that route, so you know what to expect. ...


2

As @jphi618 indicates in his comment, glass or sheet acrylic would be thin, fairly strong and fairly cheap, then painted to match the door. There is also sheet steel, which would be much heavier and expensive, but similar in thickness. There are other materials, such as sheet MDF and plywood that are available in 1/4 inch thickness and hardboard that is ...


1

The molding that holds the glass in place probably is held in place with small nails. Just gently pry up the molding with a wide (1" or even wider) wood chisel or screwdriver. Try not to dent the molding so you can reuse it. The wider the tip of the tool you use to pry it up, the less likely it is that you will damage the molding. Remove the old glass and ...


1

Many garburator a do NOT have the screw underneath. I fixed mine that way but my neighbour had a Waste King (you have to free blades from top with wooden spoon or broom handle). I used a ball of silly putty to get the small pieces and freed the blades then pushed reset


0

Sometimes you can use a soldering iron to weld the parts back together


2

If it's polystyrene, you'll probably get the best bond with modelling glue - it's as close to a weld as you can get with that type of plastic. You'll want to get all of the epoxy off first though - otherwise you won't get a decent weld. Since it is obviously a high stress part, I'd drill and pin it with piano wire in at least a couple places. That said, I ...


4

Forget trying to glue it, repair it some other way. "McGyver" it. Like maybe buy a lock hasp of appropriate size and use the staple, which is the piece that the lock shackle would go through (see picture). Sorry I could not find a picture of just the staple. Screw the staple to the speaker body and the staple hole would rest in the base, aligned with the ...


4

The key to a mortise and tennon joint is the glue surface. Often, in a manufacturing environment, when the joint is assembled, they will shoot a nail into to hold the joint until the glue dries instead of putting it into a clamp and waiting for it to dry. This speeds up production and takes up less space. There is nothing wrong with that method, but it ...


1

This is a simple repair that should only take a bit of time. The repair shouldn't be rushed so that the result is a patch that is hard to detect. Here is what you should do: CAUTION must be used when working near electric wires and devices. It would be wise to shut off the breaker at the panel before attempting this repair! Remove loose plaster sections ...


0

Water pressure at the ground level is the issue here as your pipes go up you lose pressure at .445 pounds per foot 5 stories up ~50’ your pressure would be ~22 psi less this may not be enough pressure to open the valve to the tank. If you are on a well you can increase the cut out pressure on your pump. If on a city water system contact them about the low ...


0

Clear flakes are probably some type of varnish. I would sand the surface to remove the loose flakes and to make the surface as flat as possible, then refinish with a similar varnish. I would follow the instructions on the container very carefully. Preparation is important for a good result. You can buy tack-cloths to remove dust before applying varnish. ...


1

This should work for your situation: http://www.quikrete.com/AtHome/Video-Thin-Repairs.asp


2

PC-Concrete is a brand I have used especially if you are going to paint over it. It is a good idea to acid wash the area (10% muriatic and water) then rinse. Once dry fill the area and let cure. Remember if you use Acid to add the acid to water.


2

Was there originally a piece of molding along the bottom of that cabinet? It looks like there was, and it also looks like the "crack" is actually just the joint where two separate pieces of wood were put together to form the side of the cabinet. If this is true, I would presume that the molding along the bottom used to help hold the side pieces together. ...


0

There really is no repair once hardboard starts to decay. You could paint it to prevent some future moisture intrusion, but it won't make the siding more solid. A good quality latex paint will add a bit of life to it. Whether that's worth the cost and effort is debatable. I'd replace any seriously rotten boards and ignore the rest until you re-side.


0

The circled part is known as the bottom rail; the vertical part is a stile; the assembled rails and stiles are the face frame. The stile could be joined to the rail with a simple butt joint, or pocket screws, or a mortise-and-tenon joint, etc.


1

First of all, if anything is rotted, there's a water problem. Make sure that's fixed first. As for the piece that's circled, if that is rotted, then I'm wondering if the water problem is bigger than we think. How's the floor in that area? As for replacing that one piece, there's no easy way to do that as it's likely screwed/nailed and glued. You can ...


0

If your cabinets are already painted (not stained), then I would absolutely recommend to just sand it and repaint it. Use an outdoor rated paint to resist water damage in the future.


3

Have you tried looking for a secondhand part? Or a similar model dead from pump failure etc. Our plastic handle/fascia broke. £70 for new one. Taped it up then put a search on a well known auction site. After a few months the part turned up for £15 all in.


0

It appears the switch pushes the plastic piece until it makes a PC board microswitch behind it. You need to figure out a way to attach something to the switch that would make the microswitch when you push the button. OR Attach something to the platic case that will bend like the plastic to make the switch. Good Luck!



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