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You might try sanding it very lightly with 240 grit sandpaper, then staining it with a light colored stain pen Buy two or three shades and start with the lightest color. Finish it with a wipe on polyurethane (the picture looks like a satin finish) Images and links for illustration only, not an endorsement of particular goods or sources.


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I finally got the screws out, and as you can see by the picture The lockset is largely intact. The key was to prevent the offset screwdriver from slipping. As suggested, in one of the screws I had to cut an "X" and use a flat-head driver, but the other I was able to use as is. Ultimately I had to apply a lot of pressure to prevent the driver from ...


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Thes are all good solutions however I have been using an all purpose repair mixture for many years and I have not yet found an application that it didn't work in. I have even used it for crazy stuff like when I broke off a key in a boat ignition and was practically just going to have to replace the switch even though I had a backup key. I put this stuff on ...


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I would "brighten" the bleached area with an oxalic acid based cleaner/brightner, frequently the base chemical in deck cleaners. Neutralize with a base, like baking soda. Once dry, try a dye or a pigmented stain. If the color is close, seal it with a similar finish, typically a satin polyurethane.


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You might have luck using two brazing torches, like these. My concerns usually aren't about making a mess; it's getting it to work without burning holes in it and physically getting it back together after a de-solder. I'd start over, but it's worth a shot on a $20 fitting. I'd say my re-solder success rate is 50\50 without doing more work than just using ...


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Use a reciprocating saw to remove the knob. Use it as a therapeutic session to vent your frustration. If you spend 6 hours and a couple of band-aids to save yourself from buying a new $25 door knob, you're behind a lot more than $25. (Time is money). At some point you just have to bite the bullet and purchase new things and trash the old things. Not every ...


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The Evolution Rage 3 has a three-part hinged mechanism that pushes the lower blade guard clear. One part of this mechanism was bent out of shape, and straightening it fixed the problem.


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The parts list shows M1 Blade Guard and Linkage EV3BSM1 1 M2 Blade Guard Release Lever EV3BSM2 1 From which I deduce that Wayfaring Stranger's comment is a good one to follow up. Your saw has a locking lever for the blade guard. The User Guide also shows 2. Blade Guard Locking Lever So maybe that lever is jammed/clogged or not in the position ...


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I'd drill the existing screw head off, use a bit slightly larger than the shaft of the screw but smaller than the hole in the knob. The stripped out screw should keep the bit fairly centered even when used at a slight angle. Once each head is removed you can pull the knob and try a screw extractor on what's left, but there's a good chance you'll need to ...


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What you should have done, and should start by doing, is check whether this lockset will let you remove the inner knob. Cheaper ones often won't, but more expensive ones will have the same kind of release as on the outer knob -- rotate the thumbturn to the unlocked position, depress the rectangular catch below the knob shaft's surface, and pull the knob off. ...


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Attempting to put caulking to the wall under the base board with the carpet installed is very likely going to result in caulking spread out onto the carpet - also if you ever have to pull it temporarily - the parts embedded into the caulk will separate from the rest of the carpet. Unfortunately, placing the caulking under the baseboard with the carpet ...


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Where the woodpeckers have pecked through to the air space, I have found that a handful of moth balls have kept them away from the hole. It doesn't seem to effect those that are simply pecking on the surfaces.


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I solved the same problem by with t-nuts. Embed the t-nuts into the stud, or in my case a wooden brace between the studs. Then attach the bracket to the t-nut with a machine bolt. I've screwed and unscrewed the bolt repeatedly but because it is metal-to-metal it does not compromise the wood and thus does not wobble. (I agree this question is different ...


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Replace it. There is nothing to "lubricate" (it's already full of oil) and if there was it would not increase resistance. You have some sort of failure in the valving/orifices that restrict the flow of the oil inside the cylinder and convert motion to heat. They are more directly analogous to shock absorbers (as on your car) than "hydraulic cylinders" and ...


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You will need to get in the attic if you have access to it and remove as much of the insulation above the area as you can with an insulation removing vacuum or shop vac. Then do your repair and replace the blown insulation back in place. Removing the dry wall without doing this will end up with a big mess.


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I have seen auto fiberglass repair (the type used for auto body) used to repair rotten parts of wood window sills. If the marks made by the door are very deep but don't make a hole thru the surface of the door, you could try that. To keep him from chewing wood surfaces in the future your dog needs more mental stimulation and daily long walks-preferably ...


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Often times the best location to place the drain lines along a footing is on the outside of the building structure. This allows collection of the water before it enters the area under the building. It also allows trenching away from the building toward a drain field so there is a place for the collected water to go. If you do put the piping inside the ...


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When using Oxalic acid, which usually comes in a dry crystal form, mix it with hot water, as hot as you dare, reading the labels for mix ratios. I mix it a bit stronger than they say, but that is me, I do stuff like that. You are new to this I don't recommend you do that, stick to the directions. While the mix is hot, pour it on the floor the same way the ...


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I would get a thermometer and see what the temperature is reading on the gauge. You can also get a bowl of water and see if it freezes. It may be your defrost timer, relay on your compressor, etc. First things first...Need to see what temperature it is maintaining. Hope this Helped Tim


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Freezers are not really designed to freeze things (at least not an entire freezer full of unfrozen things), they're designed to keep things frozen. They're also designed to work with stuff in them, and will likely not be as effective when empty. From your question, it sounds like you're running an empty freezer, and waiting for it to get cold. This will ...


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This is just a guess because you don't have a lot of info but I am guessing your freezer plug was never undone and that you have some ice build up causing the freezing overall. I would unplug, open freezer, take out defrost plug, and leave sit for a day or two. Put drain plug back in, shut the door, and see if it freezes.


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Posting this for continuity, the results. I actually had an open hot on one leg or branch of the breaker box, that much I knew. Here is how I found out, and what I did. OK, so I finally got the old lady to rest long enough to unplug all the breakers (physically removed from breaker box). Still had low voltage on one breaker bar. We have a master breaker ...


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I ended up having to have this replaced. I got a repairman out on a 'free housecall' who quoted me a price for the parts & labor. The price was less than a replacement, but the fellow warned me no one would warranty a repair on a 15 year old unit beyond 30 or 60 days. The unit originally had a 10 year warranty and was installed in 1999 (Craftsman garage ...


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You probably have a airlock in the pipes leading to the 3rd floor. If water can come out when you are bleeding then there is enough pressure. Close all other radiators and see if that will clear it. Otherwise the return pipe is not connected properly or just clogged. That is harder to fix.


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Even if you offered me the plastic brackets to install so I could cheat and run away, I might encourage you to use something METAL that you won't call me back for, breaking again. For these types or repairs I don't bother to find the original plastic hardware. Any hardware store will have what will fix this for the life of the cabinet: (amazon.com) ...


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new-work Halo cans are adjustable to accommodate different ceiling height. Remove the reflector trim and the lamp. Then remove the three sheet metal screws from near the bottom of the can. Slowly work the can down and out. There is enough slack in the jacketed cable to let the can hang about six inches below the ceiling. Reach through the hole and unclip ...


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Interesting problem, I encountered something similar and will relate it as it might be something to look into: The client complaint was intermittent shutdown of gas burner and pilot, requiring the client to re-light the pilot light. I discovered that, occasionally, when the thermostat called for the gas valve to open gas to the main burner, the pilot flame ...


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Given "I drained the whole system" I'd suspect a trapped air bubble first and foremost. Try bleeding again. The bubble may be trapped in the pipe rather than the radiator itself - look for bleeders along the pipes. Alternatively there may be a valve you've missed, or an actual bit of debris plugging the radiator (a pretty distant third place, in my ...



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