Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Rip the walls open. Unless someone had the sense (they almost certainly did not) to run the network cables in conduit, that's generally the only practical method to replace wires thoughout a house. It's messy and tedious and involves a lot of cleanup. Might be a lot less hassle to check for connector issues first - a 2007 house would almost certainly be ...


5

I agree that the best solution here is tell your landlord, provided you have a reasonable one. What does your lease say about routine maintenance? Chances are if you weren't doing chinups on it, you shouldn't be charged. However, if you've had a previous experience with this landlord in which they've proved to be unreasonable, you could attempt to fix it ...


3

I see that you have posted two questions about this situation. I fear you have to address a couple of problems here. First and foremost is to try to route water away from this area. We can address this in another segment with more info on the area in question. As far as the immediate problem, I am pretty sure you will have to remove the damaged sections of ...


2

Remove the tank, re-dope the pipe or wrap it in teflon tape, and reconnect the tank. You'll want to shut the water off first as gregmac aptly suggested; ideally there is a shutoff valve on both sides of the tank, otherwise the water in your house will drain out at low pressure. If you only have one, you'll want to relieve the downstream pipes of water ...


2

Sad to say, the pot-metal piece attached to the wall broke, and it's likely hard to find the right replacement part. The proper person to call in a case like this is your landlord. If it broke without unreasonable force, you should not be charged. The landlord owns the property and has the right to choose the time and manner of repair (she/he may not want ...


2

Outside of naturally occurring activities like earth quakes, sink holes, etc., I'd say the current condition relative to the age is a good indication of what's to come. There's no real answer to this without inspecting the foundation. An old, well built foundation that has never had problems and shows little sign of damage (cracks, crumbling, staining, ...


1

I am really trying to put myself in your shoes. I buy old houses and what do I look for: quality of materials used for foundation condition of materials condition of any repairs (if they can't tell me then I get very skeptical) the joists on the first floor - if the foundation has sunk then often they would change the joist angles to flatten first floor ...


1

What I have done on my 1909 house (I am in the U.S.) in the same exact situation is clear a wider area of the lath and plaster and replace it with drywall. To do that, you will need to add some padding over the studs because the lath&plaster is thicker than 1/2" -- what I did was pad it with 3/8" plywood, then drywall over plywood to achieve ...


1

Shirlock's advice is good but I want to add a few things: You need to regrade plus move spout out. However I think you have more than a standing water problem. The water damage is pretty high up and it is pointing me to thinking that your gutters are not functioning . I think your flashing may not be tucked over the gutters or something else. We don't ...


1

I am going to guess this picture is taken looking down onto the top of the lower sash of a double hung window? The wood I see at the bottom of the picture is the wood flooring a number of feet lower? If so you can drill out the pop rivets on both halves of the sash lock and replace both halves with a new unit that resembles yours as close a possible. They ...


1

First I would not paint it unless you start noticing a little rust. Better to give it an inspection every once in a while. If you do paint it, I would go with an automotive engine enamel. (it requires a long dry time)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible