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5

The attached pieces and legs may have exacerbated the effects by not moving with the seat but a piece of pine of that size was probably destined to crack regardless. You can try to weep glue down into it (run a line of yellow glue over the crack then blow it down into the void with an air nozzle) and then clamp out the space but it probably won't be ...


3

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


2

Another traditional approach to reinforcing cracked wood is to install a "butterfly key" (also known as "bowtie key"). This is essentially an inlaid piece that acts as a pair of dovetail joints to tie the two sides together. Keys can be as larger or small as desired, in similar wood or contrasting wood ... the latter is a bit more common since the key's ...


1

Remove the whole tile, like gbronner suggests, or cut a tiny one to fit. Back-fill the hole with newspaper, or better yet something not flammable, like fiberglass insulation. Thinset the new tile in place and prop it to the wall with a broom or something so it doesn't fall out. Use tile spacers, or tooth picks, to keep it from slumping down. I'd like to hope ...


1

You've got three separate problems: You have a hole in the tile You have a hole in the sheetrock/backer board behind the tile Water may have damaged sheetrock behind other tiles. I'd start by removing the grout around the broken tile with a grout saw, and prying the tile off. Next, I'd take a look at the rest of the wall behind the tile... if it is in ...


1

You may be able to find some NOS (new old stock) pulls of the same type on eBay or Etsy. I recently did the same thing for an old writing desk that was missing one of the pulls. I couldn't find a match for the missing one, so I replaced the whole set. If you want them repaired, then they will probably need to be brazed and re-tapped. That is a job that you ...


1

If it were me I'd hit it with a dye stain first to help color the scratches but this takes a light touch and a bit of experimenting to get the tone right. If the marks disappear with a little oil you can probably just apply (after a good cleaning with Murphy's Oil Soap) a light coat of linseed or tung oil, followed by a reapplication of whatever poly was ...


1

If the base is hollow and open at the bottom, I would try making it slide around something heavy. Make a concrete block or something that will fit fairly tightly inside the base. Make it a bit shorter than the base to ensure the table goes all the way to the floor. Then when you setup the table you sit the block on the floor, lift up the table and slide ...


1

Dig out the bad/loose stuff. Fill with an epoxy based filler (such as Bondo). Redrill the holes. Reinsert the cam bolts. Product references are for illustration only and not an endorsement



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