Hot answers tagged

5

Don't laugh, this may work as I have used it on stuck or cross-threaded bolts and locks. Remember that heat makes metals expand, while cold makes metals contract. Looks like the usual 5-pin tumbler lock. I do not know how the key is stuck, but brass is a soft metal. After long term use the surface can becomes rounded and not move the tumblers correctly. The ...


3

Coil Life I'm not sure if how long they "should last" matches most home owners experiences. Looking at many consumer complaint websites showed many users with failure between 5 and 7 years. Recommended Maintenance Didn't Save Me You should always do the recommended maintenance, but in my case maintenance wasn't the problem. I have a 14.5 SEER, 2.5 Ton ...


3

best thing to do is install 3/8 threaded rods immediately below each rung. just drill a 3/8 hole through each stringer such that you can put a threaded rod directly under and touching the bottom of each rung (as close as possible). run the rod through each stringer and then put a large fender washer and nylock nut on the outside of each stringer. the ...


3

The right way to fix this is to have a local engineer size a LVL (laminated veneer lumber) beam for you (solid wood lumber won't meet modern standards for a span that long). It'll likely be taller than your current beam. You'll need to temporarily support all the rafters with a framed wall on each side, using double top plates. Keep them a few feet away from ...


3

It doesn't matter where the break is. You cannot repair the element without shortening it, which will reduce its resistance, causing it to burn hotter than it is designed to do. If you are very lucky it will just burn out again right away before setting your clothes on fire. Of course the appliance designer allowed some safety margin in the specs, because ...


2

Steel wool and a wire brush with a lot of elbow grease will get the rust off. Once cleaned you can apply a spray can of high heat black paint. The kind I find and buy doesn't have a gloss to it though so getting that shine might require a high heat enamel paint which I'm not aware of being in a spray can at my local stores.


2

clean the holes out well with vinegar and water. then put epoxy dough in the gaps, smooth and point as well as you can. once cured, drill new holes, but larger diameter and deeper. then use anchoring epoxy (like redhead a7 or c6) to mount threaded rods. attach your gates with nuts and washers and you are done.


2

Should I be concerned? It's good to be concerned, as many decks are poorly built. Fortunately, most 'cracking' of support columns doesn't affect the integrity at all. This type of cracking is called 'checking' and happens as the wood slowly dries out. Code typically is accommodating of this...hence the 6x6 (as opposed to a 4x4). If you visit an old ...


2

Graphite lube is better than WD-40 for locks... try a product called lock-ease. Use a rubber mallet and whack it hard many times while turning and jiggling the key. Don't hit the key, when hammering. Keep turning-pressure on the key while hammering and jiggling. Edit- You can use WD-40 in a pinch, if you don't have graphite, but you should then use ...


2

The vast amount of stress on vertical (and steeply angled) members is compression, and splits are very common without significant degradation of structural integrity, especially in cedar. Having said that, the break does go pretty far along a notched area, so I would consider reinforcing the piece. I would probably skip the glue and drive a few stainless ...


1

I find that a urethane caulk works wonders in cases like this. It bonds like no other caulk I've used, can be had in a huge variety of custom colors, doesn't shrink much, remains very flexible, and is paintable. I'm most familiar with OSI Quad. Be warned, it's extremely sticky--you won't get it off your clothes, and you'll have to wear it off your skin. It ...


1

(can't see the images as I am at work) I had a key get stuck in a lock half rotated once. I forget exactly what happed. I believe it has something to do with ability to set the lock for a different key, one of the pieces got jammed. I ended up disassembling the entire lock and reassembling.


1

You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such ...


1

It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


1

It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...


1

In lieu of expensive underpinning or buttressing, you could use tie-bars and plates. This method is commonly used to strengthen old brick (or other masonry) structures in areas prone to seismic activity. You would drill through the foundation walls below floor level and run several iron tie-bars all the way through, with gusset plates on the outside. On ...


1

Normally,the frame of a prehung door is a bit smaller than the opening. When it is installed, that space allows you to use shims to fine-tune the frame's poisition so it is straight and level snd square even if the opening isn't. Mounting screws are then driven through the shims and into the structural framing to hold the door in that position. Gaps ...


1

In general, it is not worth taking apart tools such as a handheld circular saw or drill. There is not much in the way of user-serviceable parts, and doing so may void any warranty you have with the manufacturer. First, I recommend looking up if there are any "consumable" parts such as fuses which are user-serviceable. This may be a quick and easy fix. Your ...



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