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18

No, in general, you don't need to prime existing paint. To prepare for repainting: wash the wall to remove any grease. fill any holes and cracks with suitable filler, possibly using flexible filler for cracks. sand and prime the filled areas - priming will seal the filler and keep it in place. You might want to sand and reprime the whole wall to avoid a ...


9

Good question Nick. I manage several rental units and have dealt with the same situations. Originally, flat paints were used in most of the rentals and almost every couple of years they needed repainting especially if kids were in the unit. Flat paint is hard to wash and very susceptible to marring and finger prints etc. The newer flat enamels are better, ...


8

If we're talking a cast iron radiator, it's a good process. First you need to remove the old finish. You can get it sandblasted, or you can get in there with some sandpaper for a few hours. A wire wheel on an angle grinder can get out a good bit, or you might have luck with chemicals to strip them. If you do use chemicals, you'll have to wait for them to ...


8

Neither! Your door should be painted the same color as the trim, which is usually in a glossier finish than the walls. Semi gloss or gloss is typical for trim and doors. The best finish is achieved when you remove the door, lay it flat and paint it with a good soft bristle brush. If it is a raised panel style door, start by painting the inner most details ...


8

Painting with a roller leaves an "orange peel" type texture that you can't match exactly with a brush. When you brushed your new paint on, the orange peel texture in the unsanded areas just telegraphed through your new brushed paint, but the smoothly sanded parts had no such base texture so they look visibly smoother. To fix this I'd go over your patches ...


8

Sand them LIGHTLY with 120 and then 220 grit on an random orbital sander, taking care not to burn through the paint that's already on, and then re-spray. When spraying, lay the doors flat. Apply a THIN coat of paint. The doors can be stood up once the paint has flashed. Try to do it in a place that's out of the sun and preferably out of any blowing dust. ...


7

Shirlock gave you a great answer but I'll share my experience from being an apartment painter as well. The reason almost every rental unit is painted flat is because every unit is painted between every tenant. The reason for this is that you can never trust a tenant to keep the walls in perfect condition. It's not a blame/finger pointer, it's just a fact ...


7

If you want a really nice job, get a drywall pole sander and give the wall a quick going over with 200-250 grit paper before priming, and before your final colour coat. Remember to wipe with a damp rag (use the pole sander if you like) before applying any paint/primer.


6

Most likely, you tried to cover too much area between dunks of the roller in the paint. The later strokes have less paint, so you're seeing some of the underlying color come through, whether it's primer or another layer of paint. Some tips that might help: go back to the roller tray more often. FWIW, I generally do four to five strokes with the roller ...


6

I really think a palm sander is the wrong tool for this job. Palm sanders are great for finishing with finer grits but lack the power to remove layers of paint quickly. The siding job you are starting would go a lot faster with a 5 or 6 inch dual action (DA) sander with prepunched velcro backed sandpaper disks. There are several nice ones for under $100 and ...


5

I know you're removing the carpets, but shampooing them will get rid of a lot of the lingering smell. You may need to do it more than once; if so, make sure to let them dry completely in between. After they're dry, vacuum them with a HEPA filter to remove dust or smoke particles that you might have dislodged while shampooing. Smoke will have settled on ...


5

Do I need to sand or is a good wash down enough? Or maybe a liquid sander? A good wash, followed by a thorough drying, followed by a light sanding with fine grit sand paper to rough up the existing surface. Sanding ensures the new paint will get a good grip on the old paint. Do I need to prime, or is the old paint (cleaned a bit) good enough? ...


5

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


4

I wouldn't try to scrape off the messed up area while it's wet because you'll leave ridges at the edges of the area, which will look even worse. Leave the area to dry before trying to fix it. To get it to dry quickly, higher temperatures and low humidity are your friends. I've used a space heater and an oscillating fan when I needed paint dried quickly: ...


4

As we always advise, the secret to a good paint job is proper preparation. It can be a pain, but you must remove all loose and peeling paint, wash the surface and Spackle holes and cracks before priming and painting. Often a light sanding is a good idea, especially on any glossy finishes. Be aware of lead hazards on any paint applied before 1978. The actual ...


4

If the present paint on the doors is indeed sticking very well and the surface finish is conducive to overcoating then I would recommend a process to fill in the peeled out areas with a spackle or drywall mud. Apply one of these materials with a putty knife, let it dry and then lightly sand to get a smooth even surface. Sometimes it is necessary to apply a ...


4

Yes you can paint them with high heat BBQ grill paint. You can find this paint at any hardware store, walmart or lowes etc. It is rated for 1400 degrees normally. Be aware, however, that the surface in contact with your pans will wear off fairly quickly. I personally would paint the grates, then burnish the paint off where it makes contact with the pans so ...


4

Given the direct flame exposure, and that the flames are actually quite a bit hotter than BBQ paint is rated for (1950C for natural gas, 2392C for propane) I'd suggest sticking to clean, coat with vegetable oil (wipe on a thin layer) and bake. This makes a pretty good finish, and does not involve anything that's not going to happen in normal food preparation ...


3

Karl Katzke is absolutely right with his advise. I'll add a couple more observations. Since you mentioned the paint was still tacky days after applying, that is an indication that way too much paint was applied and/or humidity is high slowing the drying process. Second observation: Never back brush with a 3/8 roller if you want a smooth finish. By ...


3

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


3

Priming is best. If you have to do two coats of paint to cover the old color, why not use a good primer or primer/sealer and one coat of a good paint? Most people will say otherwise, but primer will stick to old paint a lot better than new paint will. I recommend wiping the walls down with a damp cloth first, but it's a lot of work, and I've never done it ...


3

More coats of primer might have done the trick. Paints have different levels of coverage/opacity. If you wanted to even out the texture, that is harder; maybe some sort of skim coat over the entire wall, to unify it? Or pre-paint/joint compound/etc. over just the areas that were chipped. I don't know whether you can add additional layers over your ...


3

The difference in the texture is because a roller was used originally and then you are painting the patch with a brush. Use a roller on the second coat and you will notice the texture will match exactly. That is one of the reasons why you are told to cut in on the edges with a brush first and then roll out the rest of the wall... because if you do it the ...


3

The foul smell is from the volatile organic compounds in the paint decaying. Could very well have mold spores living in it. Whatever you are smelling its going straight into your lungs because smells are particular. If it was me I would get rid of it like it was a plague. My suggestion is get a heavy duty respirator with the proper filters and a boat load of ...


3

Whatever generates the least dust. Hand wash (least dust) Hand scraping Hand sanding (wet if possible) Power sanding (most dust) (should be connected to HEPA vac Murphy oil soap (trademark for soap recommended for wood) on the dirty sections. Prime with the best, most tenacious primer. Pros must follow the EPAs RRP rules: mask off work areas, put ...


3

To me, it looks like you have a very old Zinc coated gate, which has many areas which have been touched up with a grey paint (I may be completely wrong).. Typically the galvanization is done when the clean metal fence is dipped into molten zinc and effectively coated in a corrosive resistant zinc shell. if you would like to return the fence to original ...


2

First advise is not to use any "sealer" on window frames. Paint won't normally adhere well to wood sealers. If possible, I like oil based exterior primer, even two coats so your frames are well covered. The you can use any good latex exterior trim paint. Remember, prep is very important, and you cannot use oil based primer over any latex, so if you have ...


2

Try some very fine steel wool, #0000 should do it. Confine it to the paint spots only, as best you can. You may try using small amounts of the spirit you tried with that. If the wool dulls the shine of the floor finish test an area first and apply wax over the treated area when done to restore the luster. You could also try automotive scratch removing ...


2

It looks like your wall is white, so this may not apply to you, but I've had great luck taking chips of wall (large flakes, pieces of trim) to paint stores and having them do a computerized color-match. I've done this at least four times, and have been happy (surprised!) with the results each time. Generally it's the finish (flat/egg-shell/semi-gloss/glossy) ...



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