Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

No, in general, you don't need to prime existing paint. To prepare for repainting: wash the wall to remove any grease. fill any holes and cracks with suitable filler, possibly using flexible filler for cracks. sand and prime the filled areas - priming will seal the filler and keep it in place. You might want to sand and reprime the whole wall to avoid a ...


18

Take off outlet face plates, unscrew light fixtures, etc. Tape over the outlets and switches. Bag the light fixtures. I've seen a lot of painted-over receptacles. There's no reason to do that, since it's so easy to do it right. I've seen edged-in face plates and light fixtures. Again, easy to do it right.


14

Don't wash brushes out between coats, and don't leave them sitting in thinner. Wrap them in a plastic ziploc bag. If they'll fit in the bag, then great. If not just bunch the bag around the handle and tighten a cable-tie around it.


14

The key to getting a good finish is preparation. Make sure that the surface you are painting is clean and dry, free from any loose flakes of old paint. Fill any cracks with a suitable filler and prime this before applying the colour. Sand the surface first, then wash and finally brush.


13

Keep a damp rag in your pocket for the odd drop here and there. Damp it with the right solvent for the type of paint you are using.


10

For crisp lines: after taping, paint along the tape with the color that is under the tape and let it dry. Some will leak under the tape (which is ok, because it's the same color) and seal it. Then paint the new color.


9

Good question Nick. I manage several rental units and have dealt with the same situations. Originally, flat paints were used in most of the rentals and almost every couple of years they needed repainting especially if kids were in the unit. Flat paint is hard to wash and very susceptible to marring and finger prints etc. The newer flat enamels are better, ...


8

Painting with a roller leaves an "orange peel" type texture that you can't match exactly with a brush. When you brushed your new paint on, the orange peel texture in the unsanded areas just telegraphed through your new brushed paint, but the smoothly sanded parts had no such base texture so they look visibly smoother. To fix this I'd go over your patches ...


8

Sand them LIGHTLY with 120 and then 220 grit on an random orbital sander, taking care not to burn through the paint that's already on, and then re-spray. When spraying, lay the doors flat. Apply a THIN coat of paint. The doors can be stood up once the paint has flashed. Try to do it in a place that's out of the sun and preferably out of any blowing dust. ...


8

Neither! Your door should be painted the same color as the trim, which is usually in a glossier finish than the walls. Semi gloss or gloss is typical for trim and doors. The best finish is achieved when you remove the door, lay it flat and paint it with a good soft bristle brush. If it is a raised panel style door, start by painting the inner most details ...


8

If we're talking a cast iron radiator, it's a good process. First you need to remove the old finish. You can get it sandblasted, or you can get in there with some sandpaper for a few hours. A wire wheel on an angle grinder can get out a good bit, or you might have luck with chemicals to strip them. If you do use chemicals, you'll have to wait for them to ...


7

Shirlock gave you a great answer but I'll share my experience from being an apartment painter as well. The reason almost every rental unit is painted flat is because every unit is painted between every tenant. The reason for this is that you can never trust a tenant to keep the walls in perfect condition. It's not a blame/finger pointer, it's just a fact ...


7

Whenever possible, try to work into a wet edge. Don't cut in edges too far ahead before rolling. Painting over a dried area produces overlap stripes!


7

If you want a really nice job, get a drywall pole sander and give the wall a quick going over with 200-250 grit paper before priming, and before your final colour coat. Remember to wipe with a damp rag (use the pole sander if you like) before applying any paint/primer.


6

Most likely, you tried to cover too much area between dunks of the roller in the paint. The later strokes have less paint, so you're seeing some of the underlying color come through, whether it's primer or another layer of paint. Some tips that might help: go back to the roller tray more often. FWIW, I generally do four to five strokes with the roller ...


6

Use quality materials and professional grade brushes and roller covers. Use the right brush or cover for the job and type of paint you are using. Add in a knowledge of proper techniques, and you will get a good paint job.


6

I really think a palm sander is the wrong tool for this job. Palm sanders are great for finishing with finer grits but lack the power to remove layers of paint quickly. The siding job you are starting would go a lot faster with a 5 or 6 inch dual action (DA) sander with prepunched velcro backed sandpaper disks. There are several nice ones for under $100 and ...


6

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


5

Get a good sash brush and practice edging without tape. (For me) it's faster and there's no chance of it bleeding past the tape edge.


5

Where carpet meets baseboard, run 2" masking tape along the edge of the carpet. Then use a broad scraper (or something similar) to push the tape down right where the carpet meets the baseboard. This compresses the edge of the carpet, keeping it well out of the way. When you paint the baseboard, there's no chance of a) getting paint on the carpet, b) ...


5

Use TSP. You can get it at HD/Lowes. Follow the precautions!


5

I know you're removing the carpets, but shampooing them will get rid of a lot of the lingering smell. You may need to do it more than once; if so, make sure to let them dry completely in between. After they're dry, vacuum them with a HEPA filter to remove dust or smoke particles that you might have dislodged while shampooing. Smoke will have settled on ...


5

Do I need to sand or is a good wash down enough? Or maybe a liquid sander? A good wash, followed by a thorough drying, followed by a light sanding with fine grit sand paper to rough up the existing surface. Sanding ensures the new paint will get a good grip on the old paint. Do I need to prime, or is the old paint (cleaned a bit) good enough? ...


5

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


5

Your best shot at that would have been to take a large enough chip from the damaged portion of the wall before it was repaired, take it to a paint store to have it computer color matched. There would have been only a chance it would been an exact match still. Your best bet if it is close enough, is to paint the wall corner to corner, at least it would not be ...


4

I wouldn't try to scrape off the messed up area while it's wet because you'll leave ridges at the edges of the area, which will look even worse. Leave the area to dry before trying to fix it. To get it to dry quickly, higher temperatures and low humidity are your friends. I've used a space heater and an oscillating fan when I needed paint dried quickly: ...


4

Priming is best. If you have to do two coats of paint to cover the old color, why not use a good primer or primer/sealer and one coat of a good paint? Most people will say otherwise, but primer will stick to old paint a lot better than new paint will. I recommend wiping the walls down with a damp cloth first, but it's a lot of work, and I've never done it ...


4

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


4

Brush and roller care: If you're doing a lot of painting, get a brush spinner. The spinner both grips brushes by the handle, and can have roller sleeves slid over it as well. That way, when you wash out a brush, you can spin it dry, then wrap the bristle in kitchen roll. When the brush dries out fully, it's kept its shape rather than splayed out all over ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible