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10

Working on a house that you're already living in is a lot more stressful, because you're living in a construction zone. Here are a few tips: Select a part of the house to be construction-free. Your family can be comfortable in that space while other parts are in chaos. Clean up at the end of each day. This will make the construction space less stressful. ...


7

I'm not sure if this question really falls into the DIY category, but it is interesting and I'm sure shared by many inspiring DIYers. You have already committed to the project so some of this advice is not timely. I think the most important factor in DIY work is understanding the scope of the project, and the skills needed to complete them. Working on old ...


7

Safety first Make sure you wear proper safety gear. Safety goggles, appropriate gloves, hearing protection (if applicable), and a hardhat, might all be useful safety equipment. Watch out for that... Make sure you know what is inside the wall/floor, cutting through a wire or pipe can ruin your day really fast. "Did it come out yet?" It might be a good ...


6

Unless you have scrap laying around, you'll be buying a 4x8 sheet of drywall anyway (unless you can find damaged panels or the hardware store sells half sheets). So anything less than 4x8 will be about the same amount of work to patch, so cut out as much as you need. Just remember to try and end in the middle of a stud. If it's 8ft. from floor to ...


5

Check local codes -- you may not get a choice in the matter. Check the door to see if the fire rating requires it to be mounted one way or the other. Otherwise, look at convenience. Will the door open completely with the car in the garage or your workbench in place? From a security standpoint, having it swing into the basement would be more secure as the ...


5

So based on advice from ratchetfreak in comments I took his advice and went with the 'corridor' effect on the 37" wall (pic below). As the room has two doors it gave me an interesting perspective on what the 'walking into the room' vibe was. For door #1 (the bottom door in pic) I felt like the closet made the room feel smaller on entrance. For door #2 (left ...


5

Heading into a major renovation without a detailed plan, materials schedule and a clear budget can turn what should be a gratifying experience into a nightmare. Preplanning is the key to success. Take your time, if you don't have the ability to create detailed drawings of the new layout, then it may be wise to have an architect create some plans for you. ...


5

I don't think this indicates a problem. Circuit breakers have at least 2 different triggers for cutting the power: Thermal mechanism for small over-current protection, e.g. trying to draw 20 amps from a 15 amp circuit. This may take several seconds or even more than a minute, depending on how much over the rated capacity you are. Magnetic mechanism for ...


4

I would guess that your issue is that you didn't prime first. From Wikipedia: A primer or undercoat is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. Priming ensures better adhesion of paint to the surface, increases paint durability, and provides additional protection for the material being painted You buy primer from the same store you ...


3

I would not let a designer make these kind of decisions. A good architect, a builder, or a good general contractor would be your best bet. You could always bring in a city inspector and ask them for a few thoughts too. If money is no object than almost anything goes with a basement. You can basically put a wall anywhere as long as you aren't moving ...


3

99.9% of the time, an entry door from a garage into the house swings in towards the house like any other entry door. Not only does it secure the hinge pins indoors, but allows installation of a screen or storm door on the garage side. Often a door opening into a garage would interfere with a car entering or a car door opening if left open. Funny fact: ...


3

It ain't called "divorce dust" for nothing. Living with a home improvement project in the works is indeed very stressful as you can't feel "settled" in your own home, and such projects are often kindling for fights about money (the number two cause of divorce) Confine the projects to one room or area of the house at a time. Living in a completely torn-up ...


3

There are a few considerations to cost, I don't consider reliability to be a major factor in either style of roof. Dormer and shed style roofs have been used for many hundreds of years successfully. The main choice for either of these is aesthetics, and simplicity of assembly. First, if you have to deal with a large snow load it is cheaper and easier to go ...


2

One thing to consider is whether there are any steps involved. A door cannot open over steps. If you absolutely need to have it open into a stairwell, then you need to build a proper landing, big enough for a person, and the door to open. Next, prefer to have the door open inward, so that the hinges are inside. However, the main point of security should ...


2

With the shed style, you have fewer intersections to worry about so statistically you would have a lower risk of leaks. But if a quality contractor does the construction of either style, then you don't have worry about this being a problem. Depending on the construction of the roof, a shed style dormer might not be possible. It's also possible you might not ...


2

Yes you can set drywall directly to the block wall. If it intersects with an exterior wall that is exposed to the weather, I would place a layer of poly of out of the intersecting corner, if accessible, out no more than 2', 18" would probably be better, vertically to prevent any moisture coming through the block and getting into the sheetrock. Use drywall ...


2

You might as well just remove the stud and small section of plate that contacts the wall. this will allow you to completely insulate the wall and the stud can be re-installed outside the insulation and screwed into the upper and lower plates if you cut them correctly. This will also come in handy when you go to put walls against the insulated concrete. The ...


1

The weight of the roof will be so little in that area, that if you have a fascia board, that will hold it together in a straight line for the short time while you are adding the header. If you have aluminum wrapped fascia, you will most likely have 2X material for a sub fascia, that's even better, unless it is a cover over an existing 1X fascia. Even if it ...


1

Based on your description of the loading, I wouldn't be too concerned about supporting it at all unless you're going to leave the framing out for any significant period of time (days for example). If anything it might sag a fraction of an inch, but you'll true it up when the new header goes in. You'll want to remove the old one first and re-frame that ...


1

To get the floorspace and some light, I guess you could paint the attic section brilliant white, or mirror-line it (the light-pipe idea without restricting the size to the size of the light-pipes - perhaps using builders aluminum foil) put a "skylight" on it in the upper bathroom ceiling and put floor-load and fire-rated glass panels in the bathroom floors. ...


1

If you live in a cold climate I would sacrifice a couple square feet of living space and add 2x4 studded walls in front of block wall. This way you can get proper insulation and use electrical boxes. If you are getting permits you may be required to do this to insulate the walls up to R21 depending on climate zone


1

Any decent contractor will be able to help you with that. When you are ready to get the work done call a couple to come out to give a design and quote. You can pretty much put a wall where ever you want. But obviously there is better places than others. If you are adding a bedroom there needs to be an egress window in that room but other than that there ...


1

You did not supply actual dimensions for the new door size, new frame rough opening size, or the old frame internal dimensions. As such it is difficult to give specific advice. That said here are some basic suggestions. 1) Before fitting the new frame within the old frame do remove the doorstop molding from the old frame. 2) Remove any and all casing from ...


1

I would look into renting a bull float and pulling one of the resurfacing cement products that have plasticizers in them. They can be troweled to knife edge thinness. If the floor has been sealed (does a drop of water bead up or absorb?), you may have to abrade the sealing off, to allow the new cement to bind. Latex admixtures are usually used to promote ...


1

A floor drain is no problem in a bathroom, in fact that's a bonus! Just don't let it dry up. As for where to start, here is a general guideline: Tear out all the drywall and to expose any rotten areas. Replace rotten studs, one at a time (full-length, don't patch). You don't won't to remove a whole wall at once, it may be load-bearing. Put in temporary ...


1

The biggest reason for me a garage door should open INTO the home...full arms make it easier to open the door when the door PUSHES rather than PULLS. If your hands are full of grocery bags and you are trying to pull the door toward you to open it, it is much more awkward than just pushing on the door once the handle latch is released (also for this reason, ...


1

Take a look at the Ikea closets. They are pretty functional and are designed to look built in. Also I don't think there's any actual law requiring a closet in the bedroom. So you can call any room a bedroom as long as it has appropriate egress, door and your septic tank is big enough.


1

I agree with what has already been said, and I empathize with you - DIY renovation is a pain. When I had to do some renovation to a condo I was living in (with 3 small children), my wife and I could only designated a couple hours each night after the kids were asleep to get done as much as we could. My only advice is that sometimes it's actually worth the ...


1

Do smaller projects before you attempt a full remodeling so that both you and your spouse can calibrate your expectations for how long things take, and so that you are sure that you enjoy the process. If the project is large and you only have evenings and weekends available, only do it if your spouse is also taking part in the work (even if it is to a ...


1

How did I survive my 3 year home Reno ? The only thing I thought of each morning was "do not quit" even when I prayed for an act of god to swipe this soul sucking, money grabbing, dust producing pile of wood/ stucco and granite off the face of the earth I would just focus on the house being finished and have persistence to see it through. Oh. And I drank ...



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