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7

Well, you really only need to punch one or two holes in the drywall to get it started, then you can simply pull it down with your bare hands. Assuming it's really just drywall and not something heavier. Sawing lines won't really help, however, as properly installed drywall has screws ALL OVER it - so just go with "punch hole and start pulling"...


5

We ended up using Krud Kutter Adhesive Remover, several pots of boiling water combined with a sturdy long handled floor scraper (& elbo grease) followed by a large orbital sander with 60 grit sanding screens. This still didn't get all of the adhesive off :( but we have enough off and it's smooth enough for us to paint the floor, based on what I've been ...


5

Tool rental places probably rent concrete grinders for big jobs like refinishing concrete floors and then you can use a sander that get get into corners. Floor Grinder Concrete Sander You can probably rent one or both of these, depending on the amount of glue. If it's just spotty you can probably use the hand sander. Like I said, these are for ...


3

Yes, if you have your heart set on removing them, then after you remove the outlet, tie the two black wires together with a wirenut, and tie the two white wires together. That way, you will still have power going to wherever the next electrical box is. For the ground, you can either screw it to the box, if it is a metal box and you can find a place to do ...


3

Instead of using a rope to wrap the pipe I would use a piece of heavy chain. The technique is to wrap the chain around the pipe several times and then connect the ends up short together leaving enough of a loop to poke a timber such as a 4x4 through the loop. Use a 4x4 about 8 to 10 feet long and use it as a lever over the top of a short fulcrum post. If the ...


3

Sawing drywall is pretty loud. The drywall acts like an amplifier for the sound. I would not recommend it as a quiet method. You can use a utility knife to cut the drywall. It would take several passes but it will work. Once a piece is cut you can pull it free. This might work for a small piece but would be a lot of work for a whole wall or room. You ...


2

Do you have sufficient variance between the house and your property line to allow for the addition of this shed there? Is there a zoning or housing code you need to check? Are you getting a permit for this? Most parts of the country require a building permit for anything that attaches to the residence. Having it permitted protects your future resale ...


1

The OP is probably fine with Ben's answer, HOWEVER, you should only nut the wires together if you are sure that they were previously connected, E.g, had taped-off the same outlet (that still had its linking bar intact). Two blacks and two whites could mean there is multiple circuits present. If turning off one single pole breaker killed all the power in ...


1

I think: No, it is not a good idea. You can expect all the difficulties of renovation, new construction, and building relocation, combined. Perhaps also conflicts with land use regulations as well. Without tying the roof to the adjacent structure, expect water damage to both the shed and the home. Support for the shed should be suitable for the soil and ...


1

Sticking to item 1 : what difficulties might you expect: Practically speaking, cutting it in half and moving it will be a problem (or a "challenge" as the folk who like to pretend that problems don't exist like to euphemize.) Moving a shed is awkward enough when it's a complete structure. Once you cut it in half you'll lose a good deal of what structure it ...


1

Here is an idea to consider. If the tile comes off the cement board fairly easy, you could leave the cement board, scrape off the thinset and lay your foam and laminate over the cement board. Just a thought depending on the overall thickness you need to achieve.


1

If it was installed correctly, the cement between cementboard and wood will be thinset and it will break off the wood fairly easily - it's put there to fill the space well, not to actually bond it particularly. If it was glued down with construction adhesive you might be in for a more miserable time. Safety glasses, gloves, and a sledgehammer to get started. ...


1

If you don't care about the existing granite, a hammer strike near a corner should split the slab and make it easy to wiggle a large flat blade screwdriver to "separate and lift". To minimize munging the cabinet, place a smallish piece of broken granite beside the next victim and use the former as a fulcrum.


1

You'll have to get it started somewhere, but a thin wire wrapped on a handle at each end (as for cutting cheese) will normally cut things off if glued with something reasonable (ie, silicone or similar.) If they epoxied it in place, it's going to be much more difficult. Heat would be my first approach in that case, hoping the stuff softens, or turns out to ...


1

I have repaired the issue I had with this tile. I did not take the advice given above and looked around for an alternative as the risk of damaging the tile-warmer element was too high (and expensive). I spent a few hours and carefully dug out the grout around the tile and surrounding tiles - this was very tedious as I didn't want to damage the heating ...



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