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However, there's a foot and a half of insulation over this ceiling. Knocking it down to install new drywall is not an option. It's an option, just one you're too lazy to do.


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One coat of base coat Durabond 90 and one coat of regular 90 mud. First you have to knock down the high spots with a scraper. The 90 is a mud you have to mix yourself; it's made by Sheetrock brand.


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If you saturate toilet paper with the remover and slap it on your vertical surface it will stick there and hold it against the caulking. Practice a couple times with water to get a feel for the appropriate amount of moisture. Scrape off as much as possible before you start in with the remover though. Just to clarify, you should be using a plastic blade in ...


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Pull the outlet cover and verify that that you've got sheetrock on top of sheetrock first. Assuming that is the case, you should be able to remove the extra sheetrock layer with a chisel and screwdriver. Then patch the inevitable damage and sand the whole thing. If it were me, I'd keep the granite and add tile or metal to the bottom of the cabinet.


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Something else to try might be to place backer board over the whole area. Shim the stucco area out in a few places ( ideally at studs) to support the backer board and provide a sturdy mounting surface. You'd lose a little depth but you wouldn't have to worry about joining tiles to granite or removing stucco; you'll have a nice uniform surface. You may want ...


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I just went through the process of removing a broken-off fence post without removing the concrete pier. Tough job! I expected it would only take a couple of hours, and that replacing just the post would be easier than digging out and breaking out the old pier, disposing of the concrete, and pouring a new pier. Maybe not, though, especially if the old post ...


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As long as you disconnect the wiring to them, nothing says that they can't just stay in the ceiling. I'd try reaching through the hole with a flatbar to detach them from the framing, disconnect any wiring, and then just push them out of the way.


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I'd widen the hole as big as you need to get the job done right, remove the cans, and patch the drywall when you're done. Alternatively, you can hide the hole (or a sloppy drywall patch) with a ceiling medallion and mount your pendents to that.


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I have a quality steel Japanese made version of this style that is much thinner and sharper on the leverage end (right). The thin cross-section allows it to slide behind just about any molding without damaging the edges while the width of the blade spreads the force so it doesn't readily split the wood.


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I would guess it is similar to this one. The finial on the bottom should unscrew and allow the glass to drop. It's possible that you'll find a nut inside someplace (or that some part of the finial trim is just stuck). I have occasionally run into fixtures where the threaded pipe is one piece that goes all the way through from finial to mounting bar, but if ...


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It turns out that the previous owner had 3 100 watt bulbs in a fixture only rated for 60 watt bulbs. This caused the paint on the metal to peel/adhere to the glass. It eventually fell off on its own since I left the bottom screw off. One of the sockets was blackened from the heat, so all 3 of these things in my house are getting replaced ASAP.



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