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2

I have worked with Sharkbites 100s of times as I often use these for quick jobs, especially in houses that are a copper and pex hybrid. Here are the easy tips for dealing with this: To get the connector out you must press on the release collar. The tool picture above works but I have also used needle nose pliers when I didn't have the official tool ...


-1

Cut it off and replace it with a sharkbite union and a small piece of pipe. Probably not as clean as the other approaches, but I'm not sure I'd want to use that PEX end after it had been mauled by the sharkbite teeth.


4

Try pushing the pipe in a bit, before pulling it out. Sometimes the barbs dig into the pipe, so the release ring can't disengage them. Pushing the pipe in, may allow the release to completely disengage the barbs. Use the tool to compress the release ring. Push the tubing deeper into the fitting, while keeping pressure on the release tool. Pull the tubing ...


0

just NO to pretty much every answer given here. remove your popcorn in half an hour get enough plastic sheeting that you can tape it from the very top of your walls, drape over furniture, right across floor. Tape it all together so it is one big sheet, neatness does not count get a backpack water sprayer and really soak the ceiling soak it some more wait, ...


0

I don't know about code requirements, but what I have seen done with disconnected electrical wiring abandoned in the wall is: Disconnect and remove from the electrical panel. Label it. At the other end where the baseboards were, connect the hot and neutral with a wie nut, tape it on, and shove it in the wall. Shorting it like that prevents someone from ...


0

The code is more concerned with wires you can access and remove. A good example would be a drop ceiling grid. In your case if you do not have that ability then yes just snipping off the wires will suffice. As an extra precaution stager the cut ends and tape off the ends with electrical tape. Then remove them completely from the panel as to prevent any ...


1

The best support for that 10 foot tall, 2 ton (4,000 pound) column of bricks would be a column of bricks underneath it all the way down to the foundation. Wait, you already have one of those... ;-)


1

It is 'thinkable' in my opinion, BUT!... There are (among others, already pointed out) reasons to not to do so. Let me bullet this: brick weights a lot - try to compute it (well, I know that You cannotcompute ;) but at least, try to do so), so it needs a good, solid support - that makes another issues: computing the support (civil engineer ...


2

Have you the faintest clue what 10 feet of chimney weighs? "reinforce here" to WHAT exactly, that's going to hold up 10 feet of bricks? This is a bad, terrible unthinkable idea. Take it down from the top, or hire somone else to take it down from the top, or far enough from the top that you feel comfortable working on it. Don't kill yourself, or someone ...



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