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41

Damaged screws are extracted by drilling into the screw with a drill bit, then using a special screw extractor bit that is tapered and has threads which turn opposite to those of the screw. The extraction process should be done slowly and carefully because the extraction process is more fragile than the normal insertion of a screw. I found this to be a ...


31

You may be able to cut a notch in the screw head using a hacksaw (or similar cutting tool), then use a slotted screwdriver to remove it.


26

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


26

There is also a kit called a Pro-Grabbit that is made for stripped out or broken screws. I've used it before, using a portable drill with one tip to drill it out and fip the bit and it will extract the screw. It has worked for me on the couple times I've needed it and suggested for work when there is a need. This is the Pro Grabbit. Here are the ...


21

Twist in the proper direction Are you turning the right way? Remember, "Righty tighty, Lefty loosy" (which never made sense to me). Most screws are right-handed threads, so you'll turn them anti(counter)-clockwise to remove them. In some situations left-hand thread screws are used (usually to prevent screws from loosening due to rotational forces), so ...


15

Go to your local rental store and ask for a walk-behind stump grinder. They are easy to use, cheap ($40-50 a day). Get some instruction from the rental store. This machine is self propelled and can get into small areas. Grind out the stump to a few inches below ground grade, then build your shed right over it!!!! Good Luck


14

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


13

When I used to do a lot of these for a building/renovation company, the approach our foreman recommended was to assume the drywall will need replacing anyway and just rip it out. That would let you remove that entire panel in 45 minutes, and then you can just pop a new piece of drywall in, which is another 15 minutes. As you can see from your 45 minutes, ...


11

I never had luck with chemicals... steamer & lots of elbow grease was the only thing that worked for us :-\


11

If you really want to try to save the plank, BMitch's instructions for removal are spot on but instead of a circular saw, get yourself one of these babies: The square blade shown here will give you clean end cuts, and for your long run, this blade will be your friend: You'll get very straight, TIGHT cut lines along the seams, be practically invisible ...


11

If you have acess to Dremel or other rotary tool you can use a cutoff /abrasive wheel attachment to cut them off. They may have been inserted by a power tool that fires them in with a gunpowder charge. If this is the case prying them out will be difficult if not impossible. You could try a Sawzall but these type of fasteners are very hard and you will go ...


10

A stump grinder is a good choice, but if that won't work for you, here are some other options: Hire a stump-grinding service. Not exactly in line with this site's DIY ethic, I admit. Get a mattock, a digging bar, and a shovel, and dig it out. This will be hard work, varying with the size of the stump and the type of soil. Use an excavator to dig it out. ...


10

Use an iron! It is cheaper and less damaging to your lungs. Let the iron sit on the tile for about 30 seconds and it will pop right off, then move on to the next one. I renovate homes and have done it numerous times. I have well over 14000 sqft under my belt.


9

Lattice is really cheap stuff. It's probably easier to just get new lattice and rebuild the gate. Or, for a simple fix, get a wire stripper wheel for a power drill and take at it. Get as much off that comes off easily and then cover it all with quality primer. FYI, if a lot of the wood has been weathered for a while, it's going to be a chore to get primer ...


9

If you're okay with leaving part of the screw in the work (the shaft, not the head) you have the option of drilling out the screw without recourse to any special bits. Simply take a high-carbon (or harder) drill bit, one size smaller than the screw shaft, and apply to the center of the screw head at your drill's maximum torque setting. If you have trouble ...


9

Before you put a lot of work into removing the screw, you should try placing an elastic band between the screwdriver and the screw. Often when the screw isn't completely stripped this method works fairly well.


9

I had a very similar light, and the key was this: Any upward pressure exerted from grabbing the glass created friction that made it not turn. You want to touch as lightly as you can, near the edges, and try to apply rotational energy only, with no pushing up. Unfortunately, that is roughly impossible to do if you're reaching so high that you need to ...


9

I don't agree with any of the comments. It is impractical to move it. First unless you use big equipment the chances of it breaking are solid. But lets look past moving it and say that is "easy". Where are you moving it to? The bottom is probably all over the place meaning that unless where you are moving it to has very similar ground characteristics ...


8

This is a problem best suited to the professionals, but if you must do it yourself the number one priority is the safety of you and those around you. This can be a very hazardous task, if you do not take every precaution to contain and remove the spores properly. The first thing you'll have to think about is containment, you don't want to spread the mold ...


7

Do you have (or can you acquire) any pieces of aluminium or other non ferrous metal at all? If so you could cut small squares that will fit over the holes, screw them over the hole using self tapping screws and seal round the edges of the patch. Painting would give it an extra layer of protection. It might not look particularly pretty, but will do the job ...


7

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


7

If you have a reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") with a metal or demolition blade it should make short work of the nails. Make your cuts at both ends of the vertical studs, between the stud and the header/footer. Once the nails are cut the vertical studs should come right out. You can probably just use a pry bar to pull off the header.


7

Abrasive paste as sold in car repair shops to use when grinding in valves in cylinder heads is great for screw heads that are 'worn'. Place a small dab on the screwdriver head before trying to unscrew the item. The friction from the abrasive in the paste will help the screwdriver 'grab' the worn screw slot..


6

I don't think we can judge your estimates via the internet. Some info we don't have. your skill level. The time it takes to do a job seems to vary about 8x from novice to expert. Since you're asking this question, you're probably on the slow end of the scale. tools. Having the right tools makes the job go faster and produces better results, but buying a ...


6

As i get older and less ambitious to tackle tough jobs like your facing by hand, I take a little trip to my friendly "Rent Me" store for my favorite little Kabota backhoe/loader. Half day rates here are about $65 and I can do more in 2 or 3 hours with a good tractor than 2 men can do in a day by hand, and my back feels great afterwards! lol The other nice ...


6

Here is a little known secret, don't tell anyone!!!! "Bar Keepers Friend" powered cleaner works miracles with fogged, rain stained and calcium covered glass. It contains acyclic acid and a mirco fine abrasive. It cleans glass, head light lenses and fiberglass like crazy and give you a very smooth polished finish. you can also use it with a buffing wheel ...


6

Mineral spirits should work. If not, I would use Goof Off (or similiar). There's lots of glue solvents, and wood glue should be pretty easy for any of them to handle. I think it would dissolve right off, but I'd probably test it on any scrap red oak you have just to make sure it doesn't discolor. Cotton may work, but I wouldn't be afraid to use a fine ...


6

If the screw isn't buried all the way in, I've found a pair of vise grip pliers (maybe even regular) work great, just clamp down around the head (I will do parallel to the surface of the head, so you can use the length of the pliers for leverage, or in other words at a right angle to the length of the screw) and start turning, if its not high enough, I have ...


6

Put a bit of ajax powder on the screw driver tip mixed with your spit. It fills in and adds friction. Also, you can use fine dirt as a substitute for the ajax. I have used this method with great success for many years.



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