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Alternate opinion here. People do not use hot water continuously. They have moments of activity when they shower, wash clothes or do dishes. The rest of the time, the water in the pipes cools off. You know the drill: How long the hot water takes to get hot, depends on the inventory (volume) of water in the pipe. Pipe volume is the square of diameter. ...


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You can move the water heater to just about anywhere that would be convenient. However, it is not a good idea to reduce the size down from 3/4" to 1/2" directly off of the tank. You will likely run into issues with water pressure. In branch plumbing, it is best to keep the size of the pipe at its maximum until it branches off to a specific fixture. Most ...


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You don't have to do anything. Most laminate installs have a soft spot somewhere. I also don't think the soft spot will change. You either accept it or fix it. I am not saying you had a "great" install but it is what it is. If you are going to pull it up - you need to do a big enough area where it can be properly leveled. For issues like this we use a ...


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I'm Mike by the way, relax... it's going to be an improvement whatever steps you decide to take. I'm sure after reviewing all the opinions on how one might combat a situated vintage home, you'll make the right choice. I've done a lot of reconstruction/remodeling of historic houses in the nation's oldest city "St.Augustine" and first thing we look for are ...


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A non-code issue is: Best not to put panels behind locked interior doors. Someone may see an emerging electrical fire, and stop it immediately by shutting off the breaker NOW. People can self-help with routine trips - for instance whoops, the break-room toaster and microwave shouldn't be run together. You don't want to pay an electrician to twiddle ...


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That brace is almost certainly not needed. Diagonal lumber braces are an outdated method from back when walls were sheathed with individual boards, and not with modern structural sheet goods. Also, modern, sheathed and engineered truss roofs provide substantial diagonal bracing where it didn't exist with hand-framed rafter and board roofs. You don't say what ...



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