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40

It's not 2D, but have you considered Google Sketchup? It has a bit of a learning curve, but can be quite powerful. And of course it is free.


13

I worked as a contractor for years and there is really only one rule... There is always a buyer, if you wait long enough. Having said that, 'wet rooms' are not very common in the US at all. In the 100's of homes I've worked in I've only ever seen 3 of them. My advice here is two fold. First: If it is worth it to you do it and don't think re-sale, you ...


13

When I used to do a lot of these for a building/renovation company, the approach our foreman recommended was to assume the drywall will need replacing anyway and just rip it out. That would let you remove that entire panel in 45 minutes, and then you can just pop a new piece of drywall in, which is another 15 minutes. As you can see from your 45 minutes, ...


11

I think if you do it right, and make it look upscale, it can even be a selling feature. As you described it, I was thinking so long as there are glass walls or something, it would probably look pretty good. First search on google found a picture of exactly that: I totally agree with boxed-dinners, if you cheap out on it or don't do it properly, it'll ...


11

You shouldn't have to do anything too special, but here are a few tips from my experience: Use a treated board for the bottom of the wall where it touches the concrete. This will help to prevent rotting from any moisture that may seep up from the concreate. Build the whole wall on the ground just a bit shorter than the lowest joist/beam so you can easily ...


9

There is also Autodesk Homestyler (beta). I have not used it and it looks like a competitor to Google Sketchup (so not 100% 2D) but looks like it might give you want you want when laying out your basement.


7

Smaller tiles are less likely to crack on the tile itself, the joints will give first. But larger tiles are stronger in general. That said, you should work on increasing the strength of your floor before tiling if you are concerned about cracking. If you can access the joists, sister any weak places between two load bearing points. On the floor itself, ...


7

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


7

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


7

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


7

If you have a reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") with a metal or demolition blade it should make short work of the nails. Make your cuts at both ends of the vertical studs, between the stud and the header/footer. Once the nails are cut the vertical studs should come right out. You can probably just use a pry bar to pull off the header.


6

If in doubt, don't. It might be worth paying a structural engineer to take a look and let you know if it's safe to remove a wall. Depending on the layout and age of the house, it may not be possible to know without doing some destruction down to the studs to see for sure.


6

For solid 2D performance I've always been a fan of Microsoft Visio. I use it for everything from electrical layouts to micro electronics signal flow to civil engineering sketches. The learning curve is minimal if you've ever used any other Microsoft productivity suite. You can also download oodles of templates and design objects, as well as import images, ...


6

You'd need to get an engineer to look at it first. The biggest problems I can think of are structural -- even if the house is pier and beam, you'd need to move piers out. If it's not, you would need to dig out a new foundation. Then you have to figure out if the overhang is actually appropriate as a roof over indoor space, that moving the wall won't ...


5

Depending on the size of the space, it may end up being useful for a disabled person.


5

We tiled under the cabinets when we remodeled our kitchen. To tile up to the cabinets IMO is to stop short of finishing the floor. A good tile, installed properly, will last a long time; probably longer than the cabinets. The price difference for us between doing under the cabinets and not was negligible; couple hundred dollars. Looking at our kitchen, we ...


5

The first step is to look at the foundation that supports that the walls of the garage. If the walls have foundations separate from the garage floor slab and those foundations are similar in construction and depth to those of the main house then this is a good indicator that you are in a good position to proceed with the remodel plans. On the other hand if ...


5

The simple answer is if you are going to put down hardwood in the kitchen, it is usually better to install the entire floor before you put down the new base cabinets. It is much harder to fit hardwood to cabinets than to put the cabinets on top of the floor. If you were using vinyl sheet goods, I would advise putting down the subflooring then install the ...


4

Sweet Home 3D runs in Java on Linux, and Windows. It is very easy to use and a good tool for a quick, "90% perfect" sketch. Very good for indoor sketches. For outdoor sketches I suggest Inkscape. Sometimes I use Inkscape, because I can draw things there much faster then in any CAD program. Of course I do not have the CAD features like "calculate area" and ...


4

Graph paper. Seriously. Here is what I did to layout my kitchen (after trying sketch up): Measure the space. Outline your walls on graph paper 1 square = 1 foot. Make a few copies of this, and save the original. Make your appliances as little cutouts, or, just draw out on your draft-copies of graph paper until you like what you have. Unless you do this ...


4

It's just an ornamental wall it sounds like, so do it as cheap as you can :) Since you've got a beam in the ceiling, I'd just build a minimal frame out of 2x4s, nail it into the ceiling beams where you can, stick fiberglass insulation in the spaces between studs and then drywall over that.


4

I use the open source QCad software, which is available for several platforms. I use the Linux version (Ubuntu) but also tested the Mac OSX version which is time limited. The application is a little bit disappointing if you think in terms of line/shape primitives such as in usual vector based drawing software. Initially I think this kind of software was ...


4

I used 3D Home Architect several years ago to design my basement. I bought an older version for less than 20 bucks. It worked well. I would check out their newer version.


4

The only requirement for egress windows are in bedrooms for new construction, rental properties and second floor bedrooms without a second door and stairway. There are lots of "grandfather" rules as well. An under grade casual living space has no such requirement. I pull permits all the time for cellar rooms and no window specs are in effect in the newest ...


4

I can't speak for your local codes, but in general codes (in the US anyway) require a minimum ratio of the area of window to area of the room for it to be called "living space". There are also requirements for egress in that you should have two ways to get out of any "living space" room, usually satisfied by a door and a window. An egress window has to ...


4

Either way will work. My first impression would be to try to remove the old lino, especially since there is so little of it. If it turns out it too difficult, then simply remove all the loose lino, lay down your foam underlayment and go right over the whole mess. Good luck.


4

European buildings are mostly masonry - brick, stone and concrete. To put even small holes in masonry you must have a hammer action on the drill. The hammering action takes a great deal of power to operate together with the action of rotation, so a cordless hammer-drill will be much weaker than a corded one, and for masonry it makes a big difference. ...


4

You're best off taking everything down, remeasuring at the new location, and putting the wall back up piece by piece. You'll want to pick the lumber that requires the least cutting to fit in the new location, but if the new location happens to have a higher ceiling (concrete floors aren't level and joists can sag in the middle) then you'll need to get new ...


4

As the rest have said, its purely aesthetic. On this side of the kitchen, we took the backsplash all the way to the underside of the top cabinets to fill in the space. Using different types of tile, we made a pattern that we continued on the opposite wall On this side of the kitchen that doesn't have upper cabinets, we stopped it at the top marble bar. ...



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