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I had problems with the taste of the water as well. When the line was originally installed they used a flexible metal line....had it changed to a clear plastic line and now the water tastes just fine...


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A compression fitting will work, but these are much easier to work with. You just push the ends of the tubing into the connector and you're done. They are generally sold as push-to-connect fittings. This is likely the right part at Home Depot. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-1-4-in-Plastic-O-D-x-O-D-Coupling-PL-3000/100165880


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Most refrigerators come with either a 1/4" plastic or copper tube or a male hose thread (just like your garden hose spigot) inlet. If you are connecting 1/4" tube to 1/4" tube, you need a compression coupling: The inserts slide into the plastic tube to prevent it from collapsing when you tighten the fittings. If you have a hose thread connector you will ...


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Sounds like the valve is broken. You'll have to locate the shutoff valve, and turn it off there for now. Pull the fridge out, and look for a valve behind it. If you can't find one, you'll have to look elsewhere (basement, crawlspace, etc.). It's common for fridges to be fed using saddle valves, so you might want to start looking for that first. You ...


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The problem is the filter. After years of experiencing slow water (directly after changing filter) I took the filter out and inserted the bypass. Now a glass that took 3 mins to fill takes 3 seconds. I read somewhere that the problem can be solved by putting a dime sized washer over the head will also fix it. Apparently the filter is obstructing the ...


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Yes, air will have that effect. Other things to consider... If there is a valve that feeds the fridge, make sure it is all the way open (even if there is no need to shut it off to change the filtrr... The tenant may have done so and then not turned it all the way back on). Also, for my fridge at least, not all filters are the same. The whiz bang ...


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I had the same issue and it turned out to be air in the system. When you install a new filter, it's full of air. I took out the filter, dumped out the water out of the filter, refilled the filter in the sink, and reinstalled the filter. It took a few tries to get all of the air out of the system.


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We solved this problem by installing a small reverse osmosis filter for the ice maker as well as for cooking and drinking. Such a filter will soften the water without adding any chemicals at all. The only downside to this is expense. You will have to periodically change filter cartridges. That isn't outrageously expensive, but certainly more than salt. ...


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So, I broke down after all the verbal bashing and moved everything and was able to connect my kill-a-watt device to the OLD GE fridge and its running at a consistent rate of 300-302 Watts. So yea, I guess it's time to replace this hunk of junk for something more efficient


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'ben rudgers' is right. There's no analytic solution to your question. A 35 year old fridge is unlikely to operate anywhere near its original design's parameters. You'll have to address this experimentally. Using a Kill-A-Watt would be ideal. An alternative might be to observe the power consumption of the entire house, with the fridge turned off (turn ...


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Even if someone had the specifications (and that supposes that you had the model number), those specifications would be for the new-out-of-the-box performance, not after four decades of service. And given that the equipment is at least a decade older than Energy Star and more than two before it was expanded to general home appliances, the odds of those ...


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The filter will definitely restrict the flow, but it might be made worse if there is already a flow issue present. Many DIY waterline install kits come with self-piercing saddle valves. Compared to the 1/2" pipe they are fitted on (and even the 1/4" supply line), the hole they make is relatively small which reduces water flow to the fridge. Your best bet ...


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All water filters restrict flow to some degree. Generally, the more filtration/treatment the more flow restriction. If you are using an in-line filter, there are many types available. If you want to just filter out sediment you could switch to a simple (and cheap) particulate filter and probably see better flow. The ones that remove chlorine and some ...


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Perspective :) Look at it this way: with the filter installed, everything is okay, but without the filter, water runs extremely fast because it isn't being filtered. Better slow and safe than fast and unfiltered, I say. But seriously, unless the water you're feeding your fridge is pre-filtered and the pipes are all perfectly clean, you need that filter. ...



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