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29

The short answer is to check with the manufacturer. That way you can be sure to stay within warranty guidelines. The longer answer is that it varies from model to model. When a refrigerator is placed in a non-standard position (for example on its side), compressor oil can run out of the compressor and up refrigerant lines. So if you don't stand it ...


13

When you short cycle the compressor like that it's the worst thing an owner can do to shorten the lifespan of it's compressor. The refrigerator compressor uses oil to lubricate the pump. This pump runs very hot. The oil becomes dirtier and dirtier as it travels through the refrigerator tubes and clogs the refrigerant paths making it impossible for the ...


12

Use a light bulb. Besides being more than capable of dissipating the power, it has the bonus of telling you when the capacitor is empty since the light will go out. The best way is to use a spare light socket and touch the two wires to the capacitor leads. Lacking a socket, some wire and electrical tape will do the trick if you're careful.


7

You should be using an insulated shorting probe to properly discharge that capacitor. There are special shorting probes made for this purpose, but the only ones I've seen online are for really large applications (like attached to a hot stick type large). When I was in the Navy we had some nice handheld sized ones for using inside equipment cabinets. ...


7

A fridge motor is controlled by a thermostat - a device that reacts to temperature inside the fridge. So fridge motor starts/stops are completely agnostic to whether the fridge is level, the only practical consequence of fridge being non-level is extra noise. The most likely reason for fridge motor running too often are the following: loose gasket around ...


6

Are you on a city water system, or a well? Do you get the film from your tap? If not, then it's something in the water line to the fridge, or in the filter. In my whirlpool fridge, the "reservoir" for the chilled water is simply a coiled up roll of the plastic tubing. Clean out the fridge, and take a look at that to see if you can see any obvious ...


6

If you're up for it, I would install a valve in the wall while you have the water shut off. When you're done, you'll have a separate shutoff for the fridge and your bathroom available again. To make it look nice, I'd go for a valve box that you mount in the wall:


6

Make sure that the pipe is inserted into the valve as far as it will go before you tighten the compression fitting - it would only slip out if not properly tightened against the ferrule. Two other recommendations: Get rid of the piercing saddle valve and install a ball valve (1/4 turn) that has either a compression fitting or is soldered in place. Scrap ...


6

An open ground is not in and of itself a problem. Grounds are there to dump excess voltage in case something goes wrong. If all our appliances worked properly all the time, there'd be no need for ground. So what you have is two problems: Your fridge has a bare wire rubbing against the frame or other electrical short, And, the safety device meant to ...


6

What about rubber furniture cups? If they are not deep enough, you could cut a channel in the center to set the fridge leg/wheel deeper.


6

Easy, cheap option would be to use shims. These are most often used to plumb door jambs, but of course have a ton of uses in construction. Once you put them in and figure out how far they have to go, mark them and then you can take them out and cut off the excess (either with a hand saw or by scoring with a knife).


5

Well, even if they find the problem they are still going to charge you 30$+parts+install time= a colossal waste of time and money. I've owned a numerous array of mini fridges and none of them last much longer than 2 years, the workmanship on these just isn't worth fixing. Unless the fix is something you can readily check, like a reset button, I'd cut you ...


5

Two thoughts from this peanut in the gallery: Make sure whatever timer you have is designed to handle the load being pulled by the refrigerator. I'm pretty sure this is one of the top power users in the house, behind any heating systems (dryer, oven, electric heaters) and probably behind a central AC system. Using a cheap timer designed for a lamp would ...


5

Here's an outside the box idea (which assumes that your main problem is that it wakes you up): Get one of those timer plugs like they have for holiday lights and let it "unplug" your fridge while you sleep. You'll need a beefy one to handle the compressor spike when it kicks on (check the ratings on the timer plugs and compare it to the max rating of your ...


5

You can get the smaller refrigerator, and use the extra space to create shelves for bootles. this way you could have refrigerated wine and not refrigerator next to each other. The shelves would be made to hold individual bottles. Like this:


5

I don't see the harm in adding the ground wire. All neutral wires end up going to the neutral bar in the main panel that is mounted directly on the metal box just like ground wires are mounted directly a ground bar that is mounted to the box. Sub-panels are different having an isolated neutral bar but everything goes back to the main. House panels here in ...


5

You will need a compression fitting for both ends if you don't already have them. Often the fridges will come with a plastic supply line but I always like to replace it with a copper one as they last longer and are less prone to damage. You might also want to verify the valve works correctly. If it is a piercing-type valve, the often fail and should be ...


5

The water line to the fridge is most likely 1/4" OD tube (either copper to plastic). It would connect to the fridge with a 1/4" Compression by 3/8" Male Iron Pipe Thread adaptor. If this is the case, when you go to remove the line from the fridge, loosen the compression nut until the tube can be removed from the adaptor fitting. The unscrew the adaptor ...


4

There's a lot of good advice here on cleaning the inside of the fridge. One thing I'd like to add: Don't forget to periodically clean the fridge's coils. The coils are typically found underneath or on the back of the fridge, and are meant to dissipate the heat. The coils will, over time, get blocked with dust etc. and the fridge runs less efficiently as a ...


4

This may be normal. According to the manual.


4

Yes, add a ground wire and wire it to the chassis, and ideally to any metal surfaces accessible on the outside of the appliance. This is a safety feature that reduces the danger of the chassis becoming electrified (e.g. due to failure of insulation). More recent appliances with a metal chassis are grounded for this reason.


4

Usually there's a fan that moves air from the freezer to the fridge. It could be that the frost is preventing the fan from spinning and/or blocking the air chase between the two. Would probably take a week or so to build up to that point. If the defrosters not working, which, if that's the back of the interior of your freezer, it looks like it isn't, ...


4

Find the next outlet downstream from the GFCI behind the refrigerator. Then (with the power off) swap the receptacle devices between those boxes, taking care to be sure the GFCI now in the "2nd box on the circuit" is correctly wired. The refrigerator will NOT be GFCI protected this way. You can find which outlets are downstream of the refrigerator outlet ...


4

Some additional reasons a fridge may be running too much, beyond what sharptooth posted:: Thermostat may be set very low: check recommended temperature level for the kinds of food you want to store. Thermostat or temperature sensor may be damaged or in need of maintenance. Also, I know it's recommended for a fridge to have a certain amount if clearance ...


4

Congratulations, you've just stumbled upon the secret self-destruct feature that all manufacturers design into their appliances... NOT! (^-^) There is no setting of a refrigerator's controls that will "overload" a refrigerator (barring extremely abnormal operating conditions). It would certainly not flicker like that. Believe it or not, manufacturers don't ...


4

This is a 20amp outlet, but before you go drawing 16amps/80% of that, you should verify that there is a 20amp breaker/fuse on the other end as well as 12 gauge wiring (thicker than the standard 14 gauge you find on most 15amp circuits). If there is only a 15amp breaker, then the max you can draw from that outlet is 12amp (80% of 15amps). You mentioned your ...


4

It is a pretty strange design to have that fan inside the fridge. But it is needed to circulate the cold air properly within the compartments it self.. it helps avoid mould growth, humidity build up and other horrible things. -- Fans go out sooner or later.. but they usually start to make horrible noises after 12 months.. I would suggest finding a ...


4

I like Gunner's idea, but if your fridge doesn't have those legs, how about a rubber door stop? Slip it under the fridge and, if necessary, cut it off so it can (with friction) fit under the fridge and out of sight. That doesn't give a ton of contact area with the fridge, but it may be enough depending on the Herculean force you exert when opening the door.


4

You should check the specifications for your fridge and freezer, specifically the section that discusses required clearances. If you provided enough clearance, then the heat is likely not an issue as the fridge/freezer is designed to dissipate heat given the specified clearances. If your clearances are too small then there is a good chance the device will ...



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