Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

There's two ways off hand that I've used in the past -- knock it off with a chipping hammer, or grind it off using an angle grinder and disk. The chipping hammer is actually easiest because you don't spend time fighting the tool or securing the work piece. Have a stiff wire brush on hand to remove the final bits and pieces that the chipping hammer doesn't ...


8

Sorry to disagree with KeithS, however there are many companies that rebuild NiCad battery packs. I'm not saying it is a great deal financially, however most common brands can be rebuilt. NiCad packs, for example, are made of several 1.5Vdc cells. the cells themselves are usually pretty uniform in size, however can differ in quality. Putting more in series ...


6

Technically, yes you can, but in reality the results might not be great: Carpet is measured and cut to fit a house's floorplan: individual pieces are cut from a carpet roll to fit around the tricky bits in your house (door openings, inside closets, etc.) and then taped and ironed together on site. Unless you have the exact same floorplan, you're going to ...


6

Standard answer: No, not really. These proprietary battery packs often contain non-standard cells in order to cram as much power into as small a package as possible. As a result, trying to tamper with the pack could expose you to caustic, toxic chemicals, and with certain battery chemistries can even cause a fire. Do not try to disassemble a battery unless ...


4

While I cant think of any DIY project, you may wish to call or research as to whether that particular filter vendor provides recycling. If you have any friends or family with a fireplace or wood stove I bet they burn well. Barring both of those, all I can suggest is to buy washable filters in the future. You will pay a higher premium up front but it should ...


3

In theory I can't see why you shouldn't be able to re-use carpet. Things you might want to check would include: Size and shape of the room (obviously) Why is it being replaced? You mention people going for hardwood floors, but you'd want to make sure that there wasn't another reason like spillage, infestations and the like. How was it removed? If it was ...


3

Standing stagnant water can harbor legionnaire's disease, be a mosquito breeding ground, etc. And as @mike says, regional hazards vary, check with your local health authority, what works here in Oregon might not work for example, in Florida, etc.


2

Batteries plus will do a rebuild. I had them rebuild an electric razor for me and know they can do cordless tools.


2

This does not help you with your stockpile of used filters that you have right now, but for the future you could try switching to a biodegradable furnace filter (there's a few when you search Google) or you could try using a reusable furnace filter so that you do not produce as much waste. Keep in mind if you switch to a reusable filter then you need to ...


2

Typically the biggest risks from these type of tanks is an increase in mosquitos. The very young mosquitos that emerge from the water may be small enough to get through some screens or seals.


1

Not on topic, and no, too much bark. Debark them and there's nothing left. Feel free to invent a debarker that will work on tiny trees, and then find out that tiny trees are still an insignificant fiber source, with excessive handling costs associated. Grinding them up for mulch is about the best thing you can do with them, other than not getting a ...


1

You could try X'Crete which is advertized as suited to removing concrete from forms. It dissolves the concrete into a slush you can rinse away. There's probably other similar products. Or a more hard-core approach would be to use Muriatic Acid; apparently that's what masons use to clean their stuff. Downside being it's dangerous. A more tool-oriented ...


1

Get a small axe and using the thick end, hold the brick and just tap it. The mortar will come off in one go on that side. Hold the brick though, don't rest it on the ground. This way took me less than a hour to do all my old bricks.


1

Let's think about this one Tester. What can we do with a dust, pollen, allergen, mite, dander, pet hair contaminated paper product?????? Recycle it with other paper waste??? Not trying to be mean, actually just a bit tongue in cheek. Maybe a sawdust filter for a shop vac exhaust system???


1

as in paper? ... hope not :) but there are websites that can be helpful in reusing stuff we already have / receive from others http://www.ikeahackers.net/ is one of them.


1

I just made a replacement filter for my shop-vac using a 20X20X1 standard furnace filter. First I cut off the cardboard edge & separated the cloth part from the chicken wire. Then I cut the cloth in a circle using the old filter cloth as a guide. I tested the strength when wet as we're talking about a wet-dry vac. The new filter I made seems more ...


1

If you use 20x20 furnace filters, they work fine in front of 20" box fans (available cheaply) as room and work-area filters. Smaller, larger, and more rectangular filters can also be used, but they don't match the fan quite as well. No need for a frame - the fan's suction will hold the filter to the fan well enough when placed on the floor or another ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible