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I've done it twice, in 2008 and just now. Several problems: 1) old socket is riveted; 2) tight space to rewire. I drilled the old socket out (through the rivet). Next cut off any remaining rivet bur for a smooth flat surface. Buy a replacement ceramic socket for a ceiling light. The one I bought had both black and white wires attached to the socket and ...


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There is a lot of misinformation in the answers provided, in regards to LED bulbs. The difference between PAR & BR LED bulbs is minimal, and mostly cosmetic. Basically, the PAR bulb has a flat surface, while a BR bulb has a rounded surface. Given the same lumens, the same size, the same color temperature and the same lumens per watt, it really does not ...


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If you got the halos at big box just go back and ask them to find compatible connectors and snip your LED connectors off. I would do it this way so that you can reuse for other light kits. Note: The connectors are proprietary HALO. I suggest contacting them and saying that you have messed a few up from their light kit and recessed housing. The might send ...


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I would not use caulk but rather some self-stick very thin foam tape. Cut the tape into 5 pieces (5 lines, since it doesn't come in a circle, make a hexagon with it) and tape to the can. Then press onto the ceiling. But get the thinnest, and softest (least dense) tape you can find.


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@mbeckish is correct on making sure these are all dimmable CFLs. If they are all dimmable, then you've found one of the issues with leading edge cut R and RL dimmers. The rise time is so sharp that it causes issues in the electronics, usually the dimmer is what buzzes. Adding some resistance (an incandescent bulb) to the circuit will slow the voltage ...


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I have a basement room with almost the exact dimensions. You walk in the basement from stairs and basement starts in almost a corner (3/4 basement) and then you walk almost the width of the house and it is about 14 feet wide. I have 4 cans right when you get in the basement on one switch by basement door and then a square zone of 4 in the back of the room ...


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The amount of light should be determined by the use of the space. Unwelcoming (and unused) basements are usually dungeon-like (too dark). Use multiple switches or dimmers to can control how bright the room is. Another option is to use wall sconces. Some considerations for you: The brain can easily detect small changes in pattern, so make sure that the ...


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That is a big room to be done in all recessed all on one switch. I'd break it up into switched groups or areas. Use your judgement as to how many. I would probably do more than you, like 8 or even 12, but it is your room and you need to be happy with it.



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