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48

With the power off at the breaker, and verified with a non-contact tester, I've always just used a pair of needle nose pliers to grip the rim of the bulb base and turn it to remove. If the bulb is really stuck you might try spraying some WD40 around it. A similar alternative, as others have mentioned in the comments, is to expand a pair of pliers inside of ...


30

Take a piece of duct tape and wrap it in the shape of an "O", with the sticky side of the tape on the outside. Stick the loop of tape to the face of the light bulb such that it is secure. Put your hand (four fingers) inside the loop and twist counterclockwise to loosen the bulb. Credit: https://youtu.be/NNGyhRu7c0I?t=2m


29

In a pinch, if you lack a bulb remover, you can use a potato to remove a broken light bulb. Essentually, you just cut it to a size that'll fit into the socket, but engage with whatever's left of the broken bulb, then twist. This youtube video illustrates the technique.


18

Get a light bulb changer pole at your local home improvement store or your favorite hardware store. The ones with suction cups are best for flood lights, where the face of the bulb is a little flatter, but might have a tougher time gripping smaller, rounder light bulbs where you need something that can fit up inside the fixture and grip the sides of the bulb....


12

I've never been all that comfortable with @Steven's solution, as it's hard to be sure the power to the light is off when the bulb is broken so you can check, unless you shut off the whole house (or the circuits are actually really well labeled.) Pull-chain switched lights and 3-way switched lights are particularly difficult in this regard. So I bought a ...


12

National Electrical Code is pretty clear on this, at least as of the 2014 version. It says that if the fixture is above the tub or shower, and within 8 ft. vertically from the top of the bathtub rim or shower threshold, the fixture must be rated for damp locations. If the fixture may be subject to shower spray, it has to be rated for wet locations. If it ...


11

Due to the lack of adequate answers, I decided to research the differences myself and provide an answer to the benefit of the community. PAR Type Lamps From a build quality and light control standpoint, PAR type lamps are generally considered superior. The explicit parabolic nature of the reflector means light is more precisely reflected directly out of ...


10

Unless there are other restrictions such as clearance to framing members or insulation or open space above them you can use them. "New construction" is when the framing is open and not covered by drywall*; the fixture is typically attached to a framing member. As opposed to "old work" which is where it's closed on both sides and you're going through a ...


10

According to this site: R20 bulbs have reflectors that direct light forward and produce more narrow soft-edged beam that is less precise than PAR20 bulbs. R20 bulbs also produce less shadow than PAR20 bulbs. PAR20 bulbs control light more precisely and produce more concentrated light than R20. Source: http://www.agreensupply.com/difference-between-...


9

You need to consider many factors. Beam angle: spot (narrow) vs flood (wide), and everything in between The wider the angle, the farther apart the spacing can be without creating dark spots on the wall Direct vs indirect light: is the light facing the wall, so the room is actually lit by light reflecting off the wall, or are the lights directly lighting ...


9

PAR = Parabolic Aluminized Reflector. The number is the diameter of the bulb times 8, so divide by 8 to get its diameter. Thus, a PAR30 is a 3.75" diameter bulb. Our last house had PAR30 floods in track lighting in the living room (a style that was all the rage when the house was built in the 1980s). You can use them indoors. The quality of light you get ...


9

There's a company that makes suction cup hooks/hangers. You put the suction cup on an object and swing the hook. I'll bet you could attach one of these to the glass and use it to unscrew the bulb. I found this on Amazon. Edit: if the bottom of the bulb is highly curved, this won't work. The surface has to be flat or only slightly curved.


9

Another trick is to pull the trim out with the bulb but not all trims connect the same. Some use springs, some clip into a socket, while others are sealed. But usually works for me because I do it all the time.


7

I have those exact cans and they are adjustable. Take out the bulb and remove the trim. Inside you will see two or three wing nuts. Loosen these and raise the level of base to the desired location. If the base is raised all the way up, then indeed your bulbs are too long for the trim you have selected. Also note that every trim adds a different depth as ...


7

IC or Insulated Ceiling or Insulation Contact are required for can lights that touch the insulation. You cannot use a non-IC can by moving or cutting the insulation back the 3 inches required to use a non-IC can. Inspectors see insulation and they expect to see the silver cans, which is what an IC can would look like. The airtight cans are designed to use ...


7

The 3" clearance clause is referring to clearance to insulation. However, no inspector will OK these if they are near insulation, even if you were to push it 3" away. If you are installing in an insulated space you must use IC (insulation-contact) rated cans. I've done this a couple times now (installed about 35 pots in my house) and it still takes me ...


7

Use oven mitts with silicone grips Works like magic for opening light fixtures, changing light bulbs, opening jars, and so on. If you don't have silicone oven mitts, you can try a silicone baking mat. Just push the mat against the face of the light bulb and unscrew it.


7

If you search this on the internet you will find the fixture can be disassembled and the j-box can be accessed through the hole that the fixture is in. Therefore the joints are still accessible. Like here. If you bury a box under drywall it does not meet the definition of accessible according the Code since you would have to remove a portion of the building ...


6

If you've got insulation in the ceiling, you'll need to get IC (insulation contact) rated fixtures -- they're also known as closed-can. I have a small soffet built over my sink; if yours is similar, make sure that the fixture you select will fit. Other than that, don't exceed the wattage for the fixture and you'll be OK. EDIT: On second thoughts, use an ...


6

There are a number of variables you need to consider in order to space them correctly. First, how much light do you want? Brighter rooms require more lights. Related to this is the max wattage of your cans. You will need more 35W lights to achieve the same brightness you'd get with 50W cans. What type of spread (angle of light ) do the bulbs you plan on ...


5

Good question. Yes, it's likely that you have to replace everything. This is one of the downsides of recessed lighting... most of the time the wires from the service tie-in are contained inside a housing or inside of a conduit. It's not weird at all to have it be like that... there are very few can light fixtures where this is not the case (due to fire ...


5

You've got it. Just make sure that in the light fixtures you use all black in one connector, all white in the second and all bare wire in the third (from your hand-drawn wiring, it looks like that's how you plan to do it). That way, the lights are wired in parallel so that they both get the full mains voltage across them when you turn on the switch. Also ...


5

There really isn't any downside that I'm aware of. Bulbs are a concern, although that applies to any type of light: are they readily available? Can you get them from your local big box store, or do you have to resort to a speciality lighting store, though special order, or from some obscure site on the internet? Regardless of light size, providing the ...


5

I personally would abandon them for something with better requirements - there's a reason that IKEA stuff is low in price, and that reason is compromises. For instance, the GORM shelving units are strong and flexible, but take a while to assemble and are kinda ugly. In this case it looks like the compromise is the required spacing. My guess is that the heat ...


5

Cove or crown molding that is below (free from) the ceiling by 2-4 Inches will give a subdued look. I would place the strip on the wall just below the aperture of the molding (that slit exposed by lowering the molding). Some installations I've seen use a separate wall trim that angles the light strip up..IE attach a wooden strip behind and below the crown, ...


5

No, you should not have to replace both of the existing switches on each circuit. You won't be able to dim from both ends, of course. You just need a "3-Way LED Dimmer" and follow the appropriate wiring. Replace one of the switches (on each set of lights that have two switches) with the dimmer - the other switch will turn them on or off, at wherever the ...


5

Four inch and six inch recessed fixtures consist of two main parts - the can and the trim. They need to match. The first issue will be getting the old can out. If it is old-work style, it may be held in just by pressure clips on the sides, fairly easy to remove. If it is new-work style, it will be attached to framing members, either directly or with a brace ...


5

You can trim the rails so they will fit in a tighter space. Look close there are usually indents in the metal to help with cutting and snapping the rail to a shorter length. This is part of a normal install.


5

Scenario #4 I would just remove all the old drywall and use new construction fixtures. It may seem like a lot of work but all these other problems go away. Plus my "drywall guy" would throw a hissy fit trying to finish a layer over another layer with a texture. The drywall won't lay flat like it should and finishing will cost you more money or it won't look ...


4

Does the lighting have to be on the ceiling? I'm thinking you might want to go with wall sconces.



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