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1

You cannot connect there. Those wires are connected to the black and red wires of the feed from the breakers. This is probably a MWBC and these two wires have 240v across them! You need to connect to the white wire from the breaker panel, as well as either the black or red. This only goes into the junction box and then out to the furnace. Suggest that you ...


-1

I Think Line means the side FROM which power is coming as opposed to LOAD being the terminal on the power receiving side. You have a power Line coming out of wall junction. You have a load terminal on whatever device being wired. Basically means opposite ends of same circuit. Is th


2

The manufacturer of the receptacle should make this detail clear in their documentation. It might even be printed on the case of the receptacle, though perhaps in very abbreviated / "hieroglyphic" form. That said... My understanding is that aluminum wiring must be used ONLY with approved mechanical connectors specifically designed for aluminum, and of ...


1

Given that the vacuum runs with the light off, and that the light turns on and off as you move the vacuum plug in the receptacle part of this outlet, I don't think there's an external loose connection. - If there was, the vacuum would stop, too. So, I think you have a defective "Outlet and NightLight in one device", with the defect/loose connection ...


3

Those symptoms scream loose connection to me. Turn off power, pull the unit out of the wall slightly, and tighten the connections. My expectation is that during that you will find the underlying problem. If not, exchange it for another one.


1

Telephone wire. The red things are crimp splices.


5

Those are telephone wires. Looks like the cabling is CAT3, but I can't quite tell from the picture. The "red sensor" things aren't sensors, they are just splicers that are connecting two runs together. Google for "red telephone splicer" and you'll get tons of pictures of similar ones, as well as instructions on how to use them.


3

Your friend is out of his league here A GFCI outlet has two sets of terminals on it -- LINE terminals for the power IN as well as LOAD terminals that connect to the GFCI's protected hot and neutral in addition to that protected hot and neutral being provided to the GFCI's face receptacles. Hardwired applications can use what's called a "faceless" GFCI ...


3

To save $ we daisy chain outlets, 1 GCI outlet can cover others. If the first outlet in a string is protected and correctly wired,. All the outlets on the load side are just as safe, and will trip. With a cheap outlet tester with the GFCI test function you can test this out!! This is a case where you now know more than ha does!!!


4

I would hazard a guess that the boxes are not aligned perfectly. This isn't uncommon, and often the metal flanges of the outlet will need to be slightly, deliberately twisted to get the face of the outlet to match the plane of the plate (which will pretty much always conform to the wall). Another factor, as mentioned by @Tyson, is the force of the wires ...


1

This is most likely easily fixed by swapping the box out with a different style (Old Work Box) or simply running some screws into the side of the existing box if it's against a stud, depending on the situation. Pictures will help. Either way, it's unlikely that you will have to cut into the wall. a) Here is how to remove an broken electrical box: ...


2

Use pigtailing here -- the Code doesn't charge for pigtails in the Article 314 box fill accounting. However, by Article 314, your box is already overflowing -- so put an extension ring/box on it while you are at it. (You need to get the box's rated volume up to 18 in^3 to fit everything in, or 20 in^3 with internal clamps)


-1

I was thinking the same as user19141. You can have more than one GFCI on a single branch circuit. But only if they are wired correctly. If we pretend we are electrons traveling down your circuit, It would leave the panel and go to your first GFCI at some point. If than at that first GFCI you leave that box on the load screws on your GFCI and run to a couple ...



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