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4

You are on the right track. As it comes from the store, the upper and lower sections of standard double outlets are connected by the small tab connecting the brass plates under the screws on either side. To separate those sections so that one half is constantly on and the other half is switched, break the tab on the hot side of the outlet. This is usually ...


1

The primary consideration is not the static load, but the dynamic load from a heavy, rotating load. That's why there are electrical boxes specifically designed and designated by code for ceiling fan loads. See http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/elec_box_ltg.htm#step5


0

From the hardware store, get a hard-wired timer, two appliance cords (or one long appliance cord or an extension cord), an outlet, a switch, a box and cover for the outlet, a box and cover for the switch, and 4 wire clamps that fit the knockouts on the boxes. You'll also need a bit of spare 14 or 12 gauge electrical wire and some wire nuts. Figure out how ...


0

The scope of such a project is actually possible for under $35-$50 but would require some knowledge on embedded operating systems and some circuit input/output, plus python computer programming skills. The project starts with what is called Raspberry PI and from there the fun begins. Raspberry PI Tutorial Other alternatives are available, some obsolete ...


1

You have two issues: Strength of the hickey - Some hickeys are cast from cheap pot metal and would be sketchy. Some are steel but bent in the shape of a U with one open side, also problematic. Heavier cast iron ones with support on both sides wold probably be better. Strength of the crossbar - Also an issue. consider a heavier duty type or even a full ...


2

It sounds like a light switch with a built-in programmable timer would meet your needs. Here is an example of one that turns on at preset times for under $25: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004SOZHXY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1435319450&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40&keywords=timer+switch&dpPl=1&dpID=31IbSTB9PVL&ref=plSrch. I have a similar ...


2

There probably isn't anything you can buy that does this for a residential application, but it's done all the time in industrial plants, like this: As the drawing suggests, make good and sure that you're only using ONE phase. In other words, don't put the switch on one phase and the timer on the other, wire them together, and expect them to work. ...


1

See this little tab here? Turn the power to this box off at the circuit breaker, and verify it's off. Then grab the little tab with a pair of needle nose pliers, and bend it back and forth until it breaks off. Once you restore power, half of the receptacle will be controlled by the switch, while the other will be always on. A couple other notes about ...


3

To make one outlet switched and one outlet on all the time, you need to break off that little brass tab on the outlet in between the where the black and red wires are screwed in. To make both outlets switched, you need to disconnect and cap the red wire that is screwed into the outlet and not break off that brass tab. Don't mess with the tab on the neutral ...


4

That would seem to indicate a failing neutral connection, if you get a voltage tester it will likely report something well below 120v. You'll need to trace the circuit back to find the point where the neutral first fails and then check the connections for anything loose or arcing. If you can't find any bad connections on either end, then it could be a nail ...


2

I'm gonna go with tripped GFI somewhere you're not aware of.


2

I'm picking this up from our comments. So this isn't a GFCI. Although if it's in the kitchen, and isn't protected by an upstream GFCI receptacle, and isn't protected by a GFCI circuit breaker in the panel, maybe it should be a GFCI. Did the old receptacle work at all before you removed it, or had it stopped working completely? Was the hot-side (darker ...


2

My guess is that when you pulled on the wires to get to them, the hot (red or black) wire feeding the circuit came loose. They should be pig-tied inside the j-box. Turn off the breaker for that circuit, pull apart the wires and make sure they're all secure. FWIW, the hot goes to the small side of the outlet and the neutral to the wide side (green or bare ...


0

The breaker was not tripped but I did flip all the breakers off and on a couple times to be sure. Based on this and other comments, it sounds more like an open somewhere in the circuit and not a short. The other possibility is maybe (big emphasis on maybe) a bad breaker that didn't trip for a short. Here's some good reading about this subject Half ...


1

The new breaker isn't unsafe, the old one is. The old breaker--which I presume is still powering the original circuit--is still providing electricity to a circuit which appears to have a problem hidden somewhere in one of your walls. To be completely safe, shut off the old breaker (which will, unfortunately, also shut off power to everything else that is ...


5

Definitely sounds like an open neutral. By the sounds of it, the bad/loose connection is in the box where the power strip was plugged in.


3

Read inside the box. If you install 14 AWG conductors to the new box, instead of 12 AWG conductors. You'd need at least a 22 cu.in. Box, or a 3" x 2" x 3 1/2" device box. 8 for current carrying conductors. 1 for grounding conductors. 2 for device fill. 11 total, times 2.00 cu.in. for 14 AWG conductors = 22 cu.in. However, since you're using 12 AWG, the ...


0

If the wall is currently open, or will be opened, you can also add framing between the studs and use a new-work, nail to framing, type of box. The correct solution depends on the details of your situation.


1

You can use a dry lining wall back box from any DIY store. Typical video of fitting Typical web-search result Of course, the answer may vary a bit depending on whether you live in Sheffield, Alabama Sheffield, Tasmania Sheffield, Yorkshire or not in Sheffield at all.


3

If you're installing it in a drywall wall, you'd use what's known as an old work box. They can be found on Amazon


2

If you have normal power at the outlet and the outlet tester does not trip it, then there are two options: The GFI is wired backwards. A GFI has line connections (for incoming power) and load connections (for using the GFI to protect other outlets). If the incoming power is connected to the load, you will get the behavior you describe. The GFI is ...


-1

In the main distribution panel all the neutral wires are connected to each other and to ground; they are electrically the same. If you connect an ohm meter between neutral and ground at any plug on any branch circuit, you will read close to zero. However, unless a particular circuit has a common neutral, which I hate, neutral wires should not be connected ...



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