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As comments disappear over time, and this might be searched in the future, I'll just copy/paste the relevant comments that led to resolution... (me) Look for a tripped GFCI in a strange place -- garage, outdoors, basement... I regularly see multiple bathrooms fed from a single gfci that's nowhere near the rooms. – Aloysius Defenestrate 16 hours ago ...


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The tab ( a little piece of metal that connects the two brass screws) on the hot side of the receptacle should be broke out of the new receptacle. (I assume when you say re-wiring you mean replacing receptacles. Then one brass screw gets an always hot wire (usually black) and the other brass screw gets the wire from the switch (could be black or red). If ...


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It sounds like you're looking to end up with something like this Notice the white wire that's been repurposed, is marked at both ends with black tape/marker/paint. And that the tab between the top and bottom receptacles, is broken on the "hot" side of the device. Also notice that a pigtail is used, instead of connecting more than one wire to a terminal on ...


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I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


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There are a couple things you can do depending on what the cause is. If the entire cover plate stands proud of the wall, then it probably means the receptacle itself is not far enough back. Make sure it is screwed all the way into the box and that the box is set at a proper depth into the wall. If it's unfeasible to adjust the box, and you're only dealing ...


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The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


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With your help I learned that the twist connector receptacle on the generator is an L5-30 and the regular 3 prong 120v outlet plug is called a 5-20. So I ended up getting this adaptor: http://www.zoro.com/power-first-cord-adapter-20a-l5-30-5-20-4fzz2/i/G0860334/


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It looks like cable C is not what you think it is, or is shorted between black and white somewhere. If your house had been wired by a sane electrician I would advise searching out the short in the C branch. Of course this is just a wild guess -- but given the context it's possible that the switch on the C branch was changed to control half of the outlet. ...


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First, your illustrations are Mad Awesome. You could illustrate electrical books. Literally. You might even talk to Mike Holt or others doing electrical docs. That said, it appears to me you are trying to stretch the limits of a little knowledge. That's a mistake. In fact it's the mistake that caused the last guy to do such terrible work. Stop doing ...


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Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


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What it sound like you may have is a 1/2 switched outlet, this is done a lot in house. You are going to need to check line C (the switch) for continuity with a meter. First turn off the breaker that controls that area. Second check the switch, with a meter or non contact voltage tester, that the power is off. Third, knowing that the power is off, turn on ...


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Just what you asked in your question. It's called a "twist lock" receptacle and accepts a twist lock plug. You will find this type of plug at the temporary power pole on job sites. They have the distinct ability once plugged and locked-in the receptacle to remain plugged-in no matter how the extension cord is pulled. This has saved many foot steps back and ...


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The old receptacle connected the wires together internally, so you'll have to do it external to the device now. Using a twist-on wire connector (or similar), connect both the whites together with a short piece of scrap wire of the same color and size. Then connect the other end of the scrap piece of wire, to the silver "neutral" terminal on the new device. ...


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In the vernacular: no, a GFCI device is not a circuit breaker unless it says it's a combination GFCI/breaker. Technically speaking: a GFCI contains circuit breaker switching guts, but replaces the normal thermal-magnetic trip with a differential trip, or adds the differential trip in the case of a combo device. Large circuit breakers (industrial/commercial ...


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I don't think the argument was that a GFCI was designed to be a circuit breaker, but that something in their construction caused them to trip due to an overload. I can say with 100% certainty that GFCI devices are not designed, nor intended to take the place of circuit breakers. However, without actually seeing the internal circuitry, or the design ...


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No. Each type of device serves a distinctly separate protective purpose. Breaker A circuit breaker detects overcurrent faults, it does not detect ground faults. A circuit breaker will stop your house catching fire when the wiring in the walls overheats from prolonged overcurrent, it wont stop you and your family being killed by electrocution. A typical ...


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Did you check the fuse box? If the fuse is not flipped, run a continuity test. Rats have been known to gnaw through wiring. Hopefully the problem is merely a tripped switch in the main fuse box. I would also shut the power off, unscrew the plate, pull out the outlet, turn the power back on and carefully use a voltmeter to see if the black wire is hot (the ...


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An outside outlet either is a GFCI receptacle or it's protected by an upstream GFCI receptacle. For instance, the outlets on the outside of my house are protected by a GFCI outlet in my garage, so they're not even near each other. Find, test and reset all the GFCI outlets in the house and see if that restores power.


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I'll split it up below into three pieces: wiring at the switch box, wiring at the above sink light (at least with it being second in line), and wiring at the fan/light unit in the ceiling. The grey wire throughout is the neutral, the yellow boxes are wire nuts (you'll need more than shown to splice the hots and grounds at each box), and the ground wires are ...


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If you're getting power on the LINE side but not the LOAD side of the GFCI, there's a few possibilities. The GFCI is not set. Make sure the reset button is pushed in all the way. The device is not wired probably. GFCIs typically will not set if they are wired incorrectly. The device is defective. Exchange it, or buy a new one. There's a ...


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This will work, as long as you don't overstuff the switch box Your proposed scheme will function, electrically speaking. However, there is one Code concern with your scheme: box fill. Single gang boxes are not hard to overfill with wires, and introducing the extra cable into your switch box makes it likely that you will do just that. The simplest fix for ...


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It's an electrical outlet cover. We had them at one of my previous places of employment. We actually had two separate sets of them offset by a few feet under the floor of office space. The second set was for our computer networks. The center plug is to keep debris out of any outlets not in use.


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I suspect you may have something called a multi-wire branch circuit, which uses one set of three wires (rather than two pairs of wires) to handle as much load as two separate circuits. Current electrical codes require that multi-wire branch circuits must be powered by a pair of breakers that are interlocked so that whenever either one is turned off or ...


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My bet would be on it being a receptacle. Typically floor boxes like this are installed raised up a little, so as to accommodate carpet or other flooring. I would also bet on it being a single outlet. Most likely the center cap is covering the outlet and the outer screws are there to hold everything on. Since we can see a shadow from the center box, I'd ...


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It's hard to say, but looks like an outlet to me. It should be safe to use an appropriately sized philips driver to open the plug in the middle and look inside. (It looks large. Don't strip it with a small driver.)


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Since you have a meter, flip the breaker off for this circuit and remove the receptacle. Keep the wires separated and safe and then flip the breaker back on. Check the voltage between the hot and neutral. If it's 120V, then replace the receptacle. If it's still 13V, then the problem is upstream of this between the walls or at another receptacle along the ...



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