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1

I am partial to Arlington BE box extenders for such applications. The 1-gang version is the BE-1. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00303FYHS/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687542&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000GAQE9A&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0XH4QSEWDXPFGKCN0ZEJ


0

Another option is simply to remove the existing box and install a new one at the correct depth. Most of the time, electrical boxes are secured with nails in the back, these are easy to cut through with a hack saw blade.


4

There are box extenders which can be screwed onto the existing box. They can be screwed directly on top of the old box. Just do a search for "electrical box extenders" and you will find plenty.


2

If you failed an inspection they must tell you why. As Alt asked above, do you not have a receptacle at all, or is there one there but not GFI protected? Under codes going back to the 70's bathroom receptacles must be GFI protected. Before that there was no GFI protection so an earlier installation could very well have a non-GFI protected receptacle and ...


1

Yes. Bathroom receptacles must be GFCI protected. That's not to say there must be a GFCI receptacle, just that they must be GFCI protected. The protection can be provided via a GFCI breaker or other device.


0

The breaker with the green test button is an AFCI, or arc-fault, breaker, and it IS tripped. A carpet cleaner, much like a vacuum, can have a very "dirty" running motor. Meaning the brushes tend to spark a lot. This is a classic culprit in nuisance tripping AFCI breakers.


1

The breaker on right side (Second to bottom) is tripped. I am not sure if the green is a sticker on it or a little notification window, but regardless, take note on how it is in the center position. This means that it has tripped. If you try to slide it to the left, it will just pop back to the center again. To reset the breaker, slide it to the right ...


4

The breaker on the bottom right (with the green tab on it) looks tripped. They will move to center position without doing much else. Turn it all the way off and then all the way back on. If that does not work: turn ALL your breakers all the way off and then all the way on to make sure all are reset. Then look for gfci receptacles and make sure to reset all ...


0

I had to call an electrician after trying what has been proposed in the thread (thanks to all). It turned out to be an error with how the wires were installed in the electrical panel. Took just a few minutes to repair.


0

Also might it be good practice to have the alarm on a often used (lighting) circuit thereby confirming the alarm has power when lights are used. Sort of a check engine light idea.


1

If there is no GFCI on the outside outlet it likely is chained off of a GFCI outlet inside. The first thing to look for would be any other outlets inside, probably but not necessarily near where the outside wire enters the building. There may instead be just a GFCI (without the outlets) somewhere inside.


0

Wire from the panel to the closest outlet. Use Ratchet Freak's recommendation of using a GFCI since this has a potential to become a wet location. Put the GFCI at the first outlet location and wire the line/feed side of the outlet to the wire running from the panel. Add a second wire that will chain the second outlet to this outlet. On the GFCI, the ...


0

Not only that, but a 5% drop in voltage at any point from the panel is "recommended" as the maximum voltage drop. When I had my previous house built in 1996, the apprentice ran so much wire up and down the walls, that i hat a 15% drop in my bedroom. I threatened to call the state wiring inspector if it wasn't fixed. It was. Push in contacts can also lead to ...


1

There were/are two sizes of BS547 round-pin sockets. small 5A sockets for lighting, larger 15A sockets for appliances. It would be wrong to replace a small 5A BS547 socket with a 13A BS1363 socket. The wiring would not be safe for 13A and simply changing the fuse/MCB at the consumer-unit(fusebox) to a higher rating would be dangerous. In the UK I expect ...


0

The biggest problem in services is the client. Imagine you've wired whole house with push-ins but then the client decides he/she wants the light switch on the other side of the door, or the sockets in different color. With screw connections, you can disassemble and reassemble the installation. Without screws - you're screwed.


0

Code requires the wire to be 14 gauge copper when back-stabbed into a device. People buy them because stores sell them and they're easy to install. Personally, I blame 14 AWG; I only run 12 with 20A breakers. What is a nuisance trip? ;) What should I do with wires that are too large for back-stab terminals on a receptacles?


19

The sockets I've been using for the last 15 years have standard screw connection, holes behind that location where the screw pulls a plate against straight stripped wires and the push-in holes. After you've encountered a few burnt sockets from using the push-in connection in the first couple outlets in a daisy chain, you start to realize something. The ...


5

It's not that we are afraid of anything. It's that it makes poor business sense to use such a failure prone connection. Thing is, they are just unreliable. It's not that they are unsafe.


2

Yes, unreliable devices are allowed by electrical codes. Further than that, unreliable devices are sometimes MANDATED by the electrical codes: AFCI circuit breakers, for instance. The fact that the manufacturers of these devices have a great deal of influence in the bodies that create the codes may explain this situation.


1

There should be no problems with extending the circuit as you suggest. Install another box where you need it, run the cable between the boxes, and hook everything up. I'd contact the local building department, and ask them if they would consider cable run on top of cabinets to be "subject to physical damage". I wouldn't think so, but not all jurisdictions ...


0

Update - I called Home Depot and a DC extension cord will not work with this system. He said there is no way to extend this product. This leaves me with installing a second outlet which I think is still my cheapest option since I already own extra 12/2 wire.


0

I just paid $120 for an electrician to replace two receptacle outlets in my house. The house circuit to two rooms kept intermittently losing power. The circuit breaker was not tripped but resetting would sometimes work, but not always. The power would be off in the evening and when I decided to call an electrician the next morning the power was ...



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