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1

Depends how they are wired - "star" wiring (where each outlet has its own wire leading back to a junction box) will give the described result, but is unusual. Then again, as implied in comments, a "pigtailed" circuit where each outlet is connected to a short wire that connects (typically with a wirenut in the box) to the wires leading to the source of power ...


0

First, those outlet testers are a mess in a dress. Not the tester, that's simple enough, it's just 3 lights across the 3 pins. But the legend, and all the silly things it says, is about as helpful as a magic 8-ball. The light labeled "open ground" measures across the power blades. The other yellow light measures between hot and ground. The red is ...


3

In a switched outlet, the following is correct: Switch on = normal (2 yellow lights) Switch off = "open hot" (no lights at all) The yellow light that comes on for "open ground" indicates whether an appliance will have power in that outlet. As you might guess, it is connected between hot and neutral. The other yellow light is connected between hot ...


2

The tester should read open hot when the switch is off, as switches always go in the hot wire -- it most certainly shouldn't read open ground with the switch off! This means that Outlet 1 is quite dodgy in some fashion or another, while Outlet 2 likely either lacks a ground or doesn't have it hooked up.


1

The ground issue is a red herring. The issue is that one of the sockets (probably the one in the cheater) is not clamping the plug blades very well. Either it is cheap junk, or lost its "spring". As it started to heat up, it lost more spring - vicious cycle. Current was flowing, but only by arcing inside the cheater, and microwaves take a lot of current ...


3

The proper solution is to replace the outlet with a 3 prong GFCI one, and label it "No Equipment Ground". You are allowed to replace an ungrounded outlet with a GFCI. Then just plug your microwave in. Or run new wire and ground it properly, but that is a much bigger job.


2

This is not the fault of the adapter: if you'd shorted the ground wire to hot (for example), a fuse would have blown. It's almost certain that you did not plug the microwave firmly into the adapter, or the adapter firmly into the socket. As a result, there was a weak connection inside the adapter, leading to either significant ohmic load or local arcing, ...


2

There is a type of device (receptacle, switch, ...) that is called "self-grounding" that is used in these applications -- there is a spring clip on each end that is pressed firmly against the box wall by the mounting screw at that end. It appears that your receptacle lacks that -- which means either a bare ground pigtail from the green screw to a 10-32 ...


6

Have confidence in that. Metallic conduit is a higher standard, used in most commercial installations. Ground is the conduit itself - you don't see many green or bare wires in conduit work. However - the outlet screws as the only ground path is not OK. Pigtail a ground wire from the junction box. Most boxes have have one hole tapped 10-32, for a ground ...


2

Metallic conduit can act as a ground path to the box, and the outlet is then grounded because it is in contact with the box(and held in firm contact by its mounting bolts). Traditional, conforms to code. I'm personally not as happy with it as I would be with a real ground wire and have tended to install GFCI outlets in these locations when I notice them on ...


4

Approved Installations The NEC often states "Approved method" of installation, which in other words is what the manufacture instructs. In the case of the non metallic NM wire connector, Halex© offers an online manual. Other Items That Should Be Fixed The metal stud looks to be 3.5" inch and Code requires no less than 1.25" from the edge of the stud. In ...


0

It may not be higher load levels but a problem with GFCI's and motor loads, my state exemption for GFCI's includes refrigerator and freezers. If the refrigerator is the first outlet in your kitchen small appliance branch circuit a GFCI outlet can be added to the next outlet and be legal with NEC2014 code. I am out of town and do not have my code book but ...


3

It sounds like your air conditioner plug has a built in circuit breaker. If so, the breaker probably needs constant current to remain set, even when the unit is nominally off (a small trickle current is being used by the breaker and its light). If that is so, the timer would prevent the breaker plug from getting current for its standby state. It then might ...


2

If the power enters at the first receptacle outlet, then you can wire it as follows: At the receptacle outlet box 14/2 feed into the receptacle outlet box. 14/3 between the receptacle outlet box and the other outlet box. Connect white wire from 14/2 feed to the silver screw on the receptacle, and the white wire from the 14/3 cable going to the other box. ...


1

[much better answer by Tester101. Will delete this answer tomorrow once OP has a chance to see redirection]



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