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I just paid $120 for an electrician to replace two receptacle outlets in my house. The house circuit to two rooms kept intermittently losing power. The circuit breaker was not tripped but resetting would sometimes work, but not always. The power would be off in the evening and when I decided to call an electrician the next morning the power was ...


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You will need to have to provide proper strain relief of the flexible cord that drops down: (from the NEC) *368.56(B) Cord and Cable Assemblies. Suitable cord and cable assemblies approved for extra-hard usage or hard usage and listed bus drop cable shall be permitted as branches from busways for the connection of portable equipment or the connection ...


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You should open the switch box, take out the switch, and wire-nut the wires together. It is not the most intricate or "proper" (if you will) solution, but it is simple and guaranteed to work, and could end up saving you a lot of hassle and guess work! Your alternative is to get a voltmeter and station someone out at the breaker box, because you will need to ...


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It would have been simpler to just connect the bottom outlet's live (the black) to the top outlet live on each pair. The switched live wire (red normally) should be connected through to the end and labeled in each spot (this allows the next guy to restore some outlets to the switched setup).


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I would not put a 3-socket outlet on a 2-socket system, even though a lot of electricians do it. The neutral and ground are not the same thing. Neutral is part of the circuit and has electricity flowing through it. Ground does not have electricity flowing through it, unless there is a short. There is already a topic on why you should not connect the ground ...


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No. In fact, GFI protection is a safe and legal way to install 3-prong receptacles on non-grounded wiring. You are likely reading a ground in some area because armored cable will show a ground with a tester but it is NOT a safe or acceptable means of ground in all cases. Only one type of AC cable will provide an acceptable ground.


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Several possibilities - the tabs may (also) be broken on the neutral side, in which case the "dead" side may have 120V in, but without neutral it's not a circuit. If you have a multimeter, you should be able to check from the "hot" (small) blade on the "dead" receptacle to the "neutral" (wide) blade on the working receptacle to check that possibility. The ...


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Usually, a red and black wire connected to an outlet with a broken off tab indicates that one of the outlets is controlled by a wall switch somewhere. Typically this is used to control a light from the switch next to the door to the room. However, this is an unusual configuration for a counter-top outlet in the kitchen since usually the lighting is ceiling ...


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If you had intended for the outlet to be switched then the outlet should have been wired to the red switched wire going to the "hot" side of the outlet. The "neutral" side of the outlet would have been connected to the white wire. In this case the black wire in the outlet box should have been simply wire nutted to cover its end and pushed to the back of the ...


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You forgot to break the tab off on the outlet. You want the red line to control one half the duplex? And the Black to feed the other continuously? There's a little copper tab between the hot screws that you remove to do this.


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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


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There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


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GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


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Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...



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