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5

Breaking the tab on the neutral side does exactly the same as the hot side: it separates one terminal and neutral outlet from the other terminal and outlet. I can't imagine a scenario where only the neutral would be cut. The neutral should be cut where the corresponding hots are cut and come with their own neutral. For example, if the two halves of the ...


1

OK, first of all, plainly this is a mess. The fact that there is a white wire hooked up to a black wire without any recolouring of it alone says that (1) there's some amateurish stuff going on here, and (2) you cannot trust any of the white wires to actually be neutral until you prove that they are. So proceed cautiously, and take notes as you go. There ...


0

Short Answer: Yes, you're totally fine. The GCFI receptacle will "protect" every subsequent outlet, switch, or fixture on the same circuit. Example: On the same circuit, listed from breaker, you have (1) Hallway outlet, (2) Hallway light switch, (3) *Bathroom GFCI, (4) Bathroom light switch, (5) Bathroom fan switch, (6) Bedroom light switch, (7) Bedroom ...


16

If wired correctly, this is fine. GFCI outlets typically have line terminals (power input) and load terminals (power to other outlets, which will be protected by the GFCI.) Your contractor will have wired the outlet in the second bathroom to the load terminals of the GFCI in the main bathroom. There should also be a sticker on the outlet stating that it is ...


1

The OP is probably fine with Ben's answer, HOWEVER, you should only nut the wires together if you are sure that they were previously connected, E.g, had taped-off the same outlet (that still had its linking bar intact). Two blacks and two whites could mean there is multiple circuits present. If turning off one single pole breaker killed all the power in ...


3

Yes, if you have your heart set on removing them, then after you remove the outlet, tie the two black wires together with a wirenut, and tie the two white wires together. That way, you will still have power going to wherever the next electrical box is. For the ground, you can either screw it to the box, if it is a metal box and you can find a place to do ...


0

As a renter, you need to know that verbal agreements are not binding in matters of real estate. In other words, inform your landlord in WRITING that the receptacle is not up to code. Make sure to communicate in writing.


0

You have an incorrect receptacle installed at your apartment. Some genius just replaced the existing 30A dryer receptacle with the incorrect 50A range receptacle for some reason rather than doing it right. You only real option is to get the landlord/super/etc to have the receptacle replaced with the proper 30A dryer receptacle. The cord you have on the ...


1

I don't know too much about replacing outlets, only what I've read online or through YouTube videos. That's a good start but I would strongly recommend that you learn more before you make potentially safety-impacting changes in your electrical wiring. In particular if you cannot immediately state the relationships between amps, volts and watts, if they ...


0

There are only 2 correct and safe ways to add a 3-prong outlet where formerly there was only a 2-prong one*: Safe way #1: run a new cable with an appropriately sized ground all the way back to the breaker panel. Safe way #2: Use a GFCI outlet (with the "test" and "reset" buttons), which will cut off power to the outlet if it senses an imbalance of current. ...


0

The only time metal sheathed cable can be used as a grounding conductor is if it has a thin aluminum bonding strip. You MUST assure this is your kind of cable before re-installing grounding type receptacles. Image ©Mike Holt:


0

First off, I would get approval from your landlord before making any wiring changes to your apartment. You never know, he might be friendly enough that he would hire an electrician to make the changes you want. I would first attempt to figure out how the receptacles are wired to the switch. If there is a way to separate them, then I would do that. If not, ...


0

If you only have two wires one white and one black the white connects to the silver LINE terminal and the black connects to the brass LINE terminal the LOAD terminals are only needed for protecting other outlets downstream from that one . If you have a green or bare wire it needs to connect to the green screw and the box if it is metal.


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Line is the side of the device where the wires from the panel (or other equipment feeding the device) are connected. Load is where any devices that are to be protected by the GFCI device are connected. Most "newer" GFCI devices will not reset if they are not connected probably. GFCI devices use a current transformer (CT), to detect any current ...


1

There is no problem connecting wires to both the "back stab", and screw terminals of a receptacle. As long as the terminals are rated for the size of wire being attached. For example. Most "back stab" terminals are rated for 14 AWG solid copper wire, whereas screw terminals are usually 12 or 14 AWG solid or stranded copper. With that said... It sounds ...


2

I recommend that you not use the back stab wire technique. There are numerous problems with these things - both long term and short term. More often that one would like these connections lead to intermittent connections. I would remove all the wires from the sides and back stab holes of the old outlet. Connect the two existing hot wires with your third ...



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