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Similar things exist, but they usually replace the switch, not connect to the switched outlet. Googling "wall mount wireless outlet switch" brings up several relevant products. To make this work you would turn off the power. Then remove the existing light switch. Depending on how it is wired you may need to connect some of the existing wires or just cap ...


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Several possibilities - the tabs may (also) be broken on the neutral side, in which case the "dead" side may have 120V in, but without neutral it's not a circuit. If you have a multimeter, you should be able to check from the "hot" (small) blade on the "dead" receptacle to the "neutral" (wide) blade on the working receptacle to check that possibility. The ...


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Usually, a red and black wire connected to an outlet with a broken off tab indicates that one of the outlets is controlled by a wall switch somewhere. Typically this is used to control a light from the switch next to the door to the room. However, this is an unusual configuration for a counter-top outlet in the kitchen since usually the lighting is ceiling ...


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If you had intended for the outlet to be switched then the outlet should have been wired to the red switched wire going to the "hot" side of the outlet. The "neutral" side of the outlet would have been connected to the white wire. In this case the black wire in the outlet box should have been simply wire nutted to cover its end and pushed to the back of the ...


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You forgot to break the tab off on the outlet. You want the red line to control one half the duplex? And the Black to feed the other continuously? There's a little copper tab between the hot screws that you remove to do this.


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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


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There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


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GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


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Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...


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Unless there is already wiring to allow the separation of the fan and light from the same switch (ie. L/F===|sw|==[+]--), then no - you will need to run a second [+] wire from the switch to the fan or light because the current circuit would look like L/F>---|sw|---[+]--. If the circuit is like my first pictorial, then yes - it's just a matter of finding ...


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Breaking the tab on the neutral side does exactly the same as the hot side: it separates one terminal and neutral outlet from the other terminal and outlet. I can't imagine a scenario where only the neutral would be cut. The neutral should be cut where the corresponding hots are cut and come with their own neutral. For example, if the two halves of the ...


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OK, first of all, plainly this is a mess. The fact that there is a white wire hooked up to a black wire without any recolouring of it alone says that (1) there's some amateurish stuff going on here, and (2) you cannot trust any of the white wires to actually be neutral until you prove that they are. So proceed cautiously, and take notes as you go. There ...


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If wired correctly, this is fine. GFCI outlets typically have line terminals (power input) and load terminals (power to other outlets, which will be protected by the GFCI.) Your contractor will have wired the outlet in the second bathroom to the load terminals of the GFCI in the main bathroom. There should also be a sticker on the outlet stating that it is ...


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The OP is probably fine with Ben's answer, HOWEVER, you should only nut the wires together if you are sure that they were previously connected, E.g, had taped-off the same outlet (that still had its linking bar intact). Two blacks and two whites could mean there is multiple circuits present. If turning off one single pole breaker killed all the power in ...


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Yes, if you have your heart set on removing them, then after you remove the outlet, tie the two black wires together with a wirenut, and tie the two white wires together. That way, you will still have power going to wherever the next electrical box is. For the ground, you can either screw it to the box, if it is a metal box and you can find a place to do ...


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As a renter, you need to know that verbal agreements are not binding in matters of real estate. In other words, inform your landlord in WRITING that the receptacle is not up to code. Make sure to communicate in writing.


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You have an incorrect receptacle installed at your apartment. Some genius just replaced the existing 30A dryer receptacle with the incorrect 50A range receptacle for some reason rather than doing it right. You only real option is to get the landlord/super/etc to have the receptacle replaced with the proper 30A dryer receptacle. The cord you have on the ...


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I don't know too much about replacing outlets, only what I've read online or through YouTube videos. That's a good start but I would strongly recommend that you learn more before you make potentially safety-impacting changes in your electrical wiring. In particular if you cannot immediately state the relationships between amps, volts and watts, if they ...


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There are only 2 correct and safe ways to add a 3-prong outlet where formerly there was only a 2-prong one*: Safe way #1: run a new cable with an appropriately sized ground all the way back to the breaker panel. Safe way #2: Use a GFCI outlet (with the "test" and "reset" buttons), which will cut off power to the outlet if it senses an imbalance of current. ...


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The only time metal sheathed cable can be used as a grounding conductor is if it has a thin aluminum bonding strip. You MUST assure this is your kind of cable before re-installing grounding type receptacles. Image ©Mike Holt:


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First off, I would get approval from your landlord before making any wiring changes to your apartment. You never know, he might be friendly enough that he would hire an electrician to make the changes you want. I would first attempt to figure out how the receptacles are wired to the switch. If there is a way to separate them, then I would do that. If not, ...



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