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2

If the power enters at the first receptacle outlet, then you can wire it as follows: At the receptacle outlet box 14/2 feed into the receptacle outlet box. 14/3 between the receptacle outlet box and the other outlet box. Connect white wire from 14/2 feed to the silver screw on the receptacle, and the white wire from the 14/3 cable going to the other box. ...


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[much better answer by Tester101. Will delete this answer tomorrow once OP has a chance to see redirection]


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Just use outlet box #1 as both a junction box & outlet box. Having enough room in the box shouldn't be a problem, but you can always get a deeper box if desired. Wire nut the supply to another 14/2 running to the switch. Then, you'll run a new 14/2 back to outlet box #1 to power the outlet. Finally, simply run another 14/2 from outlet #1 to outlet #2. ...


2

It's worse than tester101 says. Each circuit may not see half, there may be an imbalance of currents between the redundant paths. (Especially if one has a problem, such as being completely broken). Now how are the wires protected from overload? The hots have rather nice breakers on them, but the neutrals are not breaker protected! Nothing will detect an ...


1

If you have enough wire to have 6" from the back of the junction box where you tie in a junction box would be the easiest way. Most of the time the wires are tight. then there are 2 options. #1 to pull the wire down from the outlet to your box using the wire to pull a string or the new NM cable down to the box some times the easiest is to pull a string when ...


5

With a 120/240V single split-phase system, there are two possible outcomes. Separate legs If the branch circuits feeding the device are on separate legs of the service, then the tab will be creating a direct short-circuit between the legs. This will cause a high current through the circuits, which should trip one of the breakers fairly quickly. Same ...


2

You can use spacer shims, they're available at most electrical supply, hardware, and big box stores. They're also available from various manufacturers.


3

Various products are available specifically for leveling a device in an oversized opening, such as this bracket. Selection at big box stores may be limited, go to an electrical supply house if you can't find similar.


2

Others have discussed the code requirements, so I'll answer from a physics point of view: The only real concern is that some models of dishwasher use a significant amount of power. As such, if you're planning to use the outdoor socket for more than light-duty work when the washer is running, the circuit may not have enough capacity for your needs. If it's ...


4

The 2014 NEC now requires the dishwasher to be on GFCI. The 2014 NEC does not require the dishwasher to be on an individual circuit (it never has). So, you could feed either receptacle on the load side of the other with a GFCI. Or you could put the whole circuit on a GFCI breaker. If your locality is still on the 2011 NEC the GFCI requirement was not in ...


2

I'd have no concerns about doing so assuming the exterior outlet is a GFCI and it's fairly well protected from the elements. Even if it does get wet and trip the dishwasher will remain in service. I'm not aware of any codes that this would violate, but I'm not a NEC encyclopedia like some of our members.


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The old way of running kitchen plugs was to split the top and bottom plugs so each plug was on a seperate feed. This was accomplished by running 3 wire between the plugs and removing the breaker tabs, the entire thing was conected to a dual pole break so the entire plug would trip at once. If your house was built to code before the advent of gfci this is ...


0

A plug in electrical tester will show voltage and let you know you have power there, but it will not show amperage. So if you have a loose wire connection or a wire break under the insulation on one of your receptacles that feed the others, you will see voltage, but if you plug a light in or something else that will draw some amperage, the voltage drops due ...


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Recently , I had 10 wall outlets to stop working because of a dead dropline coming the pole to my meter . Most of the ceiling lights and 2 wall outlets worked .


4

Replace the outlets with GFCIs -- the operation of a GFCI in no way depends on the presence of the equipment grounding wire. You'll have to use the "No Equipment Ground" sticker that comes with them, by the way. P.S. on the metal boxes -- since it sounds like your house is a mix of K&T and other wiring techniques (perhaps NM additions), you cannot ...


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if you have knob and tube anything, it all has to come out and be replaced with modern 2 conductor and ground wiring. this can be done at lot more inexpensively than most people think, but you need to know what you are doing, and judging by your own comments, its probably time to get a licensed electrician.


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Just confirming you have 2 potentials: Smoker actually has a Ground Fault GFCI is bad None of which are a good thing. Determine the smoker is good by testing on a known good GFCI outlet (no extension) to eliminate the easiest fix, changing the GFCI. If the smoker is bad, try to identify the damage and and repair or replace it.


2

The GFCI is tripping for a reason. Older ones sometimes tripped for false positives, but that's very rare with modern fuses/interrupters. Especially if the outlet interrupts with the same appliance every time then the problem is the appliance not the outlet. Do some troubleshooting on the grill to find out if you can repair it, or need to replace it. It ...


4

Your problem is that you have looped/paralleled the neutral (white) wire both through and around the 3-way switches, which can be interpreted as a NEC 300.3(B)/310.10(H) violation. What I would do instead is run a 14/4 between the two 3-way switches, with black as the unswitched hot and red and blue as the travelers, then run a 14/3 from the 2nd switch box ...


0

An immediate trip typically points to a short-circuit. Make sure that when you pushed the receptacle into place none of the wires came loose, and that the grounding conductor did not contact the ungrounded (hot) terminal on the receptacle.


1

It is possible that you have a bad outlet before the freezer. Many times contractors use the push in connectors on the back of the outlets called "stabs" (I think they should be outlawed). These knife edge connections don't do well with loads like freezers because they draw a large starting current. Start by checking the outlets close to the one that powers ...


2

Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? No. Suppose you come across a L5-30R (120V, 30A receptacle) somewhere. By spec, can you assume that there will be 30 amps at it? No. Follow up: if you come across a L6-30R (250v, 30A), does it have to supply 240-250v, or can it supply 208, or even 120? If they are ...


3

Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? Simple answer A receptacle, and the circuit supplying it, has to do only one or other of two things: Either safely provide the full rated current, continuously, at the full rated voltage (±10% †). Or safely trip an overcurrent protection device (a circuit breaker) and disconnect ...


0

There is no requirement in the National Electrical Code for any particular receptacle configuration. If I want to wire my whole house with twist-lock receptacles there is no prohibition of that. There is no guarantee that the rating of the receptacle matches the rating of the circuit. It may be implied but not required. The code requires a minimum ...


0

Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? The answer is usually no. A line of 20 amp outlets on a 20 amp circuit cannot all be expected to provide 20 amps—at the same time. Likewise, a 50 amp dryer or range outlet on a dedicated circuit may well have been installed for plug ("pigtail") compatibility—not because ...


1

Short answer: Yes, in general it is safe to assume that an L5-30R will supply you up to 30A (nominal, 24A continuous) at ~120V. Give or take. If you're still reading... Suppose you come across a L5-30R (120V, 30A receptacle) somewhere. By spec, can you assume that there will be 30 amps at it? The ratings of these outlets tells you about the safety ...



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