New answers tagged

2

250V is the insulation rating of the L6-30 plug. It's the never-exceed voltage. Commonly used in the US for 240V. However in some locales, mainly NYC, they supply houses with two legs of 208 wye. So it is 120V phase to neutral, and 208 phase to phase. There is no "208 2-leg" receptacle, so they use L6-30. It's on them to make sure the appliance is ...


0

The outlet needs to be listed for the voltage being used. A 10-30r is listed for 125-250v 30Amp This outlet would require a minimum of #10 wires you could use a smaller breaker but that would be silly in my opinion because the cost of the wire and outlet are most of the cost of this outlet. The problem of using the wrong type of outlet comes up when another ...


3

The plug specs are the maximum ratings given for how the plug is meant to be used in any given application. So a plug speced as 120V/30A is not designed to be used in applications over 120V and not to be loaded over 30A. Now that said....those numbers do not directly have anything to do with the capabilities of the supply circuit or wiring. If the circuit ...


3

If you plug a device into an L5-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 120 volts. If you plug a device into an L6-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 240 volts.


1

I would start by turning off the circuit, pulling out the outlet and ensuring the ground wire is connected. If the wire is connected, but still showing as not connected, I would get a cable tracker and follow the wire. The cable tracker has a sender that sends a signal through the wire, and the receiver listens for this signal. You can use it to follow ...


0

Since your home was built in 80 we know there is a ground. To track down the open, turn off the breaker and find all the dead outlets. It would be rare for a general purpose circuit to only have 4 outlets. The break in the ground is probably located at the first outlet you have an open ground. But may be the outlet prior. These 2 outlets would be where I ...


4

You can cap the wires, and cover the box with a blank faceplate. There's no problem with that, as long as the twist-on wire connectors are the correct size for a single wire.


4

Here's what you're dealing with. Disregard the top row, those are for Europe. The bottom four plugs apply in North America. Note the very significant difference in power between them, which has an impact on which large appliance they can power. The power is defined by the pin shapes, not the number of outlets. Your outlet is the common NEMA 5-15 even ...


-2

However, if you want you can still convert the power coming out from a 120v outlet to 220v by using an external device called power converter. It is a bit of a bulky box but hey, in some cases , if you really need 220v can be a solution.


8

That is a 120v outlet. 220v outlets use different shaped slots - both horizontal instead of vertical. Like this: The plugs and outlets are made to be incompatible with 120v ones because plugging a device into the wrong voltage outlet could cause serious damage or fire. IF that is a dedicated circuit for the AC it can be rewired as 240v quite easily by ...


2

Nope -- those are 120v. Sorry. They're probably like that to discourage people from plugging in 2 AC units at the same time.


10

Yes, you can. Turn off the power. Add a pigtail from the twist-on wire connector to the top "hot" receptacle terminal. Break the little metal tab between the "hot" terminals on the receptacle. Mark the white wire going to the switch with black tape or marker, so the next person knows it's being used as a "hot". The top outlet should be always hot, while ...


0

Wire design is usually based on minimizing the length of wire needed. By putting all lights on one circuit and outlets on another, it would require more wire than would normally be used and also cause needless inconvenience if the light circuit tripped late at night. Also note that some range hoods require a dedicated circuit. Also, unless the range hood ...


0

Ok, thank you to all!! I resorted to a fellow with a higher skill level on electricity, but "I helped" (I think he'll charge me extra for that). As suggested, it was a white-wire (neutral) short, coupled with a broken ground at the outlet just in front of the troubled outlet. I'll know better next time. Thanks again!


3

Short answer: No Whoever installed the boxes didn't learn how to do electrical work properly. So consequently, you have two single plates that have been trimmed. If you were to find a plate like this it would be a custom item and may cost more than it is worth. Either you will have to keep the trimmed plates, or you will have to replace the two single ...


5

Sounds like your assumption that water penetrating the box is correct no need to figure out any more than that. These boxes are not made for direct burial. (Pretty amusing actually. I will be using your picture as a teaching tool.) The conduit and wiring the box is attached to needs to be extended upward I would say a minimum of 12" above grade. It also ...



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