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15

It turns out people have consumed rainwater for millions of years. So there's some precedent. This is very well covered online, so grab a search engine and get reading. Here's a summary of concerns. In the US, it may be illegal (look up "water rights") but for individual home use, that is usually ignored. You'll get a lot of water from your roof really ...


11

Here is a pretty quick explanation. Starting from where the water will enter the drain and ending where the water will flow out, dig a ditch that's about 10 inches deep and 6 inches wide. Keep in mind that you will need to dig deeper if your starting point slopes upward. Lay about 2 inches of rock into the trench before placing the pipe lengthwise ...


9

Replace the downspout with a decorative downspout chain. Then water only drips inches to the next link, rather than all at once, the height of your downspout.


8

I think you need to increase the angle of the vertical piece just slightly so the drips can't fall the entire length of the spout and then hit the angle portion at the bottom; instead they will silently wet themselves to the side of the spout and then roll down. Detach the bottom end from the house and play with the angle while you have a slow trickling ...


7

All PVC is subject to UV light degradation. PVC without UV protection will eventually suffer a loss of impact resistance. Your pipe will be whole, until impact at which it will shatter or crack instead of flex. Some PVC (PVC UVR) is UV resistant. The sunlight still damages the PVC pipe, but it is in a matrix of other chemicals that compete for the UV ...


7

Your catchment and cistern (the part that's open to air and thus to contamination by insects/bacteria) should be as small as it can be while still providing enough capacity to take in the rain as it falls. Once rain enters the cistern from the catchment, it should then be pumped into a holding tank which is air- and water-tight, and from which you draw your ...


6

Here's another article about a French / Trench drain: Basically the same idea, except he doesn't recommend lining the ditch with fabric or putting a sock on the pipe. He does recommend using rigid perforated pipe instead of the corrugated pipe with slits in it.


5

Often over doorways, we install a simple 90 degree folded 6 inch flashing. You can slide a piece of this under the shingle tabs, two or three courses above the drip edge, secure it with a few shingle nails. I like to install them in the shape of an inverted "V". You can also use a piece of gable end drip edge to do the same thing. look in the section of the ...


5

A good example is the roofs in Bermuda. If you search for 'rain collecting in Bermuda' you'll find lots of examples. Here's one: http://www.momcentral.com/blogs/mom-central-goes-green/harvesting-rain-bermuda-life-and-law


5

Sounds like either the gutters aren't secured tight enough, or you don't have a drip-edge flashing between the roof and gutter. The drip edge deflects water out and away from the house trim and into the gutter. You install it under the shingles, pulled out slightly from the trim, and secured with roofing cement.


4

You could try the gray colored Schedule 80 PVC pipe. This is a much heavier duty material that will stand up to being outdoors. It is recommended by manufacturers. such as U.S. Plastic Corp, that PVC pipe and fittings be painted after installation with a coat of white water based latex paint to provide for UV resistance. The UV light is what is part of the ...


4

As I mentioned in a comment to Jay's post, rainwater collecting may be illegal, dependent on your State. Western states, which get less rain, generally employ the doctrine of "prior appropriation"; an entity can claim the rights to water that will enter a waterway even if it hasn't arrived there yet. This means that by collecting rainwater into a cistern, ...


3

This one is going to be nearly impossible to solve without actually being there. My advice is to call in a licensed electrician to have a look, he'll be able to trace the lines and likely find the issue quickly.


3

Where is the water damage relative to the exterior ground level? I note in the outside picture that there is significant slope to the ground - if the ground on the uphill and slope-side sides is not shaped to move water away from and around the house, it would be likely that there would be water damage on the lower parts of the walls from water flowing over ...


2

I recently installed the third gutter system on my house in 40 years. The dripping sound was maddening! Having had two others, I knew that it was this particular downspout. When I filled the gutter with water, I found a leak at the top of the downspout, where the water starts down from the gutter . The water was leaking out there and dripping down on the ...


2

I had a similar problem and added a length of corrugated tubing to my existing downspouts. What was happening is that the water came down the downspouts too close to the house. It did not have time to soak into the ground and pooled around the foundation. So using some black corrugated pipe and the right adapters got that water 5-10 feet from the house. ...


2

It seems like the easiest solution would be to just put up a gutter and then move the lower ladder to one of the other walls, no?


2

This is a stunningly bad idea, IMHO. As @Comintern notes, that's a rather significant load to plop beside your house. Far simpler and safer to run your downspouts over to where your sump pump discharges, and put a basin & pump there that pumps water uphill, to your storage tanks, set somewhere uphill, so they will provide water pressure when you are ...


2

First off, your friend should definitely talk to his landlord about the flooding. Even if the landlord won't address it, it's possible your friend could be held liable for water damage from the flooding if he doesn't notify the landlord. There are two big differences between the pump you need here and a normal sump pump. The first is that it won't be run ...


1

The Rainhandler Plus might be OK if the ground around your home's foundation slopes at least 1 inch per foot for 6 feet or more and you haven't had water leaks in your basement or home. But you'll find gutter-guard systems that are better at capturing water for far less. Consumer Reports 2010 My gutters are 3 stories above the ground level (it's a ...


1

Diversion of water as discussed in other answers is a great idea. You may also consider window well covers They come in a variety of shapes and sizes and divert the bulk of precipitation away from the well and about 2 feet away from the foundation - often enough to avoid seepage. P.S. They also are a safety feature, reducing the risk of kids/pets ...


1

Old decks get slippery when from organic material and worse with wax based sealers. Then there is the cosmetic blemish of aging with black stains from slow drying areas. Stain looks great but slows down the drying out process which aggravates spots where water collects whereas as unfinished dries the quickest but turns grey from UV. Appearance will vary ...


1

Sounds like for some reason you cannot just keep digging the 3-5 feet until the end is located? Since it is not pressure pipe, it's not the end of the world to cut a hole into the top and run water into it until you locate where it's seeping out near the outlet. Then follow the seepage back until you locate the actual end. You can patch the hole by placing ...


1

You can find the end, or at least the first leakage point in the line, with one of these: It's intended for cleaning drain/sewer pipe. How it works is the small bladder/balloon will expand under the water pressure of the hose (garden hose water source) and has a small exit point on the other side of the balloon. So it will expand to the pipe size then ...


1

Alright, so assuming it is not illegal for you to collect rainwater (and even if it is...) and assuming you have a gutter system, why not just redirect your gutter system in a catchment system, or even a few catchment systems. This guy has done something similar here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Need-Free-Water%3f--Build-a-Rain-Barrel/ Next you have to ...


1

You can use a storage tank with mesh inlet and outlet filters to prevent debris etc entering the tank, also fit a first flush divertor to flush the dirt from the line when it first rains. You can then use a reverse osmosis system to purify your water as needed.


1

Yep, that's perfectly plausible. You're saying that there's only wire mesh in the soffits -- not actual metal soffit vents? That would be the first thing I'd fix. The louvers on the soffit vents make it much harder for rain to blow up and into the attic structure. The second thing you might consider is then putting soffit baffles in ... they may make it ...


1

How about a rain diverter?


1

Put in one of these. It's a French Drain, it is also on this sites FAQ. How to build a french drain? The need for a French Drain arises from a few problems, but usually from standing water in or around your home. This is caused by poor drainage, usually from clay rich soil or overly compacted soil. A French Drain will relocate the water very efficently. ...



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