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14

Start here: EPA's guide on radon mitigation for home buyers. We have a radon mitigation system in our house. Our house failed the radon test during the home inspection, so we forced the sellers to have one installed. The work was done by a local radon contractor, paid for by the seller for $975. We also had another bid that was $1100. (Those prices ...


9

You should consider, but not invest now. Wait and test, before treating. Small design changes now, can make implementing a fix later, easier. Radon is everywhere, to some level. If you have higher levels of radon, then you need to be concerned with the rate that fresh air is exchanged in your home. Houses are much tighter today, so be more aware with a new ...


7

According to this Radon Dose Calculator, if you are exposed to 30 pCi/L the dose rate is 6.275 µSv/h. Multiply by 30 days and 24 hrs/day to get 4500 µSv, or 4.5 mSv dose over 30 days. Wikipedia suggests that is similar a CT scan (which is a significant dose). You are probably not in the house 24 hours a day so you could adjust the numbers downward. ...


6

I gave a pretty detailed answer on radon mitigation systems in a related question. Rather than repeat myself, I suggest that you read that and follow the links, particularly the EPA's guide on radon mitigation for home buyers. Radon levels outdoors are pretty much always going to be zero. It's only enclosed spaces you need to worry about. As long as you ...


5

If you are in an area with granite rock (there are other indicators of Radon, but granite is the most common) then you should get a soil survey done. As @Tester101 said, results may already exist for your area, so check this first. If the results show high radon levels, definitely get ventilation fitted - this is important for basement levels, but you ...


4

The house I am living in now had high radon levels when tested before we purchased it. We negotiated in the purchase price to have the seller pay for radon mitigation. We hired a company to install the radon mitigation system. (Make sure you check their license. Most states have to license the installer. We learned a lesson there.) In order to put the ...


4

To check if the fan is working, you can put a plastic bag over the end of the exhaust pipe and see if it inflates. Gauge oil is just the orange fluid that goes in the manometer (pressure meter) tube that indicates the pressure difference being driven by the fan. If it is missing or low, then it could give the negative reading. It should go to zero when the ...


3

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


3

Ethically? Legally? It all depends, I guess. Radon is linked to cancer, so if you care about not getting cancer, and are planning on living there, I'd look into it. Basements are more of a problem as are 'tight' houses due to lack of air exchange. We had our old house with a basement retrofitted for Radon for about $1500. I imagine it'd be significantly ...


3

I wouldn't even consider one or the other... both. An outdoor sump pump in our could climate (I'm in Minnesota) is a real pain in the neck. A good friend of mine has one in his old house and he has to bring it in every winter and put it back out when the snow starts melting, which often means a few hours digging to find the top of the sump pit, then every ...


3

You can buy a radon mitigation fan for around $100 to install along with a vent pipe. Keep in mind that the lifetime cost will be more than the part's price, since you've got to run it continuously. You'll also want to check and make sure the fan reduces the radon levels below 4 pCi/L. Here's a resource on figuring out what kind of power rating you'll need ...


2

I have also heard of putting the suction pipe into the sump (above the water level, where it can draw air) and sealing the sump. Works well if there is drain pipe connected into the sump pump.


2

I don't live in a hot climate, but I do know one thing, heat rises and cold falls. i can't understand the justification of putting AC into a crawl space that is not air tight. I answered your question a long time ago about insulating and venting the crawl, and I still stand by that advise. I can not believe the air conditioning a dirt floor crawl space is ...


2

If your basement is flooding, and you live in freezing climates, an indoor sump pump is a pretty important. A high water table also means a finished basement is going to be difficult. If you are installing the sump pump to deal with the water table, and you also need to mitigate Radon, look at a sump pump basin something like this. It is sealed from above ...


2

There are plastic-sheets available for putting under the concrete-foundation of a house that are long-term radon-safe, i.e. that won't let radon trough even after several decades. Putting such a sheet under the foundation is low-cost and easy, and I don't see any reason -not- to do so. Pay attention that you don't perforate the sheet with ...


2

This is actually just a vacuum measurement system - used to show that there is negative pressure in the radon mitigation system drawing radon gas up and out of your home. As long as the liquid in the right hand arm is higher than the left, then it is working.


2

A u-tube doesn't need calibration in the respect that the difference between the two scales will be twice the static suction. For convenience though, in order to read accurately from 0, it should be "calibrated", because some oil will slowly be lost over the years. Simply disconnect the tops of the tube and slide it until the oil level is even with the zero ...


2

It is oil of a specific density to correspond to the scale. I believe red is one density and blue another, at least for Dwyer manometers. I'm fairly sure replacement oil is available. If you don't care about the accurate reading and only that the fan is working, you could just use plain mineral oil, but you should post a notice next to the gauge that the oil ...


2

There are a variety of risks, including the risk that the system will fail to work as intended. You either punt those to let someone else design the system, or you take them on yourself when you design it. To look at just one that you've thought of: Not growing bacteria in your water system is pretty much a matter of having clean water to start with and ...


1

You are much better off preventing it from entering in the first place. But once it does enter, ventilation is the only way to reduce the levels. How effective this would be depends on the exchange volume. You would be committed to running this exchanger 24/7 for ever. Replacement costs would be much higher than the typical radon fan. Anything running 24/7 ...


1

When my radon mitigation system was installed I was told the blue liquid would fade to clear in a few years. The company said it's not a problem since you can still read the meter by looking a bit closer, and definitely not worth a service call as long as you can verify the fan is working.


1

From what I remember, the oil is typically vegetable oil with a food coloring added to it. I'm not too sure it can be replaced but I would call your local Radon specialist and ask over the phone. No need for someone to come out and make you pay to ask. If they won't answer the question over the phone, call someone else. They can't want your business too ...


1

If you have a Radon Mitigation system, then you should have no worries. A proper mitigation system puts a negative pressure on the underside of the basement slab, and vents it out the roof. The idea is to remove all radon from the basement itself. So, in theory, a cat door should have no bearing on the amount of radon in the first floor. I'd, of course, do ...


1

I'm not understanding the connection between the two issues. They really are different systems. As for Radon, not sure if it varies from state to state, but in MN they come in drill holes in your basement slab, then run PVC pipes from that up and out your roof with a low-power fan continually venting the system. The goals is to put negative pressure on your ...


1

If the French drain is between your basement slab and the exterior walls, it may be the source of most of your radon. Sounds like a small suction from the drain sump to the outside is a good plan. A small fan with its own exhaust pipe shouldn't be a problem for the water heater or furnace but a CO detector is never bad for closed rooms with gas appliances.



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