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Your best bet here is to abandon hot water entirely and look at a different old saw: steam. One-pipe or two-pipe gravity steam systems can deliver solid heating performance without any pumps or other electrically energized parts, and do not rely on high pressure to work. It will also be faster than a thermosiphon hot water system, and somewhat easier for ...


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Some engineers - in the uk - do not recommend fitting a TRV to the bathroom rad as a constant flow is required around the CH system for safety reasons. This is what I was told by a Gas Safe Engineer. The bathroom is a Wet Area so why do you need a TRV when all you want to do is keep it / get it dry. Unless others say so then no need to fit one. Two normal ...


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There are a few problems with your plan. Thermal Conductivity First off. If you're going to make a heat exchanger, you should use copper instead of PEX. Copper has a thermal conductivity of 401 watts/meter kelvin (W/mK), while PEX is closer to 0.51. Volume The next problem, is the volume of water you're preheating. 1" PEX has an inside diameter (I.D.) ...


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Did you insulate your pipes beyond the water heater so that they are not losing the heat rise per foot? The hotter they stay before appliance the less demand for rise on the heater. Make sure you tape all the seams. Also do a tune on your heater -- often with both on boil and forced style heaters the efficiency and heat rise are below spec. I've seen ...


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You could add a smaller tank-less heater in front. Some of them are even rated to be plugged into an outlet so you won't have to do additional electrical work. In Europe I've seen it done with a bigger unit to supply the whole house and a smaller one at the shower for use during the winter. In either case you're going to get a lot further with this ...


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The typical way to pre-warm water is to install a standard tank water heater before the tankless, but leave it turned off. Using an automotive radiator is a terrible idea. You don't want to connect something not designed for potable water to your plumbing. That's just asking for trouble. The pex idea is interesting. The only reason that I can think that ...


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Do NOT use an automotive radiator - it's not meant for nor suitable for potable water use. If you have a "relatively warm basement" you can either use a plain, uninsulated pressure tank (a "tempering" tank in this application - cold in the bottom, warmed out the top) or run a long run of large-ish diameter PEX (to minimize pressure drop) around the basement ...


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If your hot water heating system is making noise it's likely because there's air in the pipes. Why it happens at 5am regardless of what time you set the thermostat is odd but maybe it's related to what time you set your alarm clock? I don't think bleeding the system will necessarily get rid of the noise if the noise is coming from the pipes. In my ...



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