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2

Use the silicone, contrary to some ideas expressed it does stick well to clean smooth surfaces. So well, in fact, that mechanical scraping is often the only way to remove it once cured (actually there are some chemicals, like dimethyl adipate, that soften cured silicone). If the brackets are securely mounted to the wall, silicone will grip like hell and ...


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Soapstone is easily worked. I'd drill holes (not all the way through) and tap them with an ordinary tap, (or even a modified screw - soapstone is really easily worked) and use machine screws or stove bolts to fasten the shelf to the brackets. To make a crude tap from a screw, grind the threads off the end and grind slots. Look at a regular tap for guidance. ...


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Silicone is not a particularly good choice for your application, since, one, it's soft (when fully cured, has the consistency of rubber), two, it does not actually stick to surfaces. (And yes, it releases some acetic acid while curing, but in minor quantities, it's a one time thing, and a few drops of acetic acid aka vinegar won't eat a hole through your ...


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I would use a Polyurethane Construction Adhesive to attach the stone to the brackets. I would also install the brackets so that there is a 1 inch space between the top of the radiator and the bottom of the stone shelf. This would help reduce the heat transfer to the stone, limiting any stress due to thermal expansion of the stone.


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I don't have enough reputation here to insert a comment, but I just want to say that the radiator will not work properly then. With radiators the heat spread mainly using convective transfer: the heat go up and you are blocking it with the stone.



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