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14

The US has a mixture of systems. I'm not sure what the prevalence is, but I've lived in homes with both steam and hot water heating. Steam offers the following advantages: One-pipe systems More heat transfer for a given radiator surface No distribution pumps Steam offers the following drawbacks: Furnace needs to be a low point Corrosion Finicky ...


10

Insulate the pipes. You are likely losing a lot of heat into your basement if they aren't insulated. Unless your basement is finished (and therefore you want the heat there) you want to keep as much heat in those pipes as possible so that it gets into the main part of your house. The heater (and other similar equipment like hot water heater) should heat ...


9

This is basically going to be landlord work unless you plan playing heating technician and checking the basement pipes. Here's the gist: Air vents on the radiator must flow air out so it can be replaced by steam to heat. They sometimes have adjustment valves on them so you can balance the system. Air vents that are producing a lot of noise are either too ...


8

If we're talking a cast iron radiator, it's a good process. First you need to remove the old finish. You can get it sandblasted, or you can get in there with some sandpaper for a few hours. A wire wheel on an angle grinder can get out a good bit, or you might have luck with chemicals to strip them. If you do use chemicals, you'll have to wait for them to ...


8

Bleeding radiators is quite simple, and can usually be done by homeowners. All that's required is a radiator key, a towel and/or bowl, and a bit of time. Why Bleed Radiators Even with closed systems, air can still find its way into the system. When it does, it will collect at the highest points available (the top of radiators). Trapped air can cause ...


6

I had this issue too. Bled the system once myself, twice with professional plumbers who kept telling me that i didn't do it correctly. Cost me an arm and a leg. The worst part was when i asked a "plumber with 25 years of experience" where the air is coming from he couldn't explain it. Some people were saying it's because i have an old type of expansion tank ...


6

The first valve looks like it might be a thermostatic valve - the numbers representing the various temperature "settings". There should be an indicator on the bit that turns that points to the number. Try turning this fully towards the "1" and then fully towards the "5". Leave the valve in each position for half an hour or so. The radiator should get a lot ...


6

If your carbon monoxide detector is going off, you have a carbon monoxide problem. Contact your utility or local emergency services for a more thorough test. The symptoms you describe are consistent with early stages of carbon monoxide poisoning. If your radiators heat with hot water or steam, or another system other than forced air, you will not have ...


5

There could be air trapped in your system - that is if the pump is working. You might have to bleed the system at the burner and/or at the radiotors. And a good flush could help, but you might need help with that. A : Bleeding valve B : Trapped Air E : Reducer boiler performance


4

An alternative that might work in some rooms is a ceiling fan that has a low speed (we have some 6-speed models in our home where the lowest speed just circulates the air slightly). This would help move air around in the room (and thereby helping to move some heat away from the radiators) and has the added plus that you can use it on higher speeds for ...


4

I think you need to balance the system; as water will always take the easier option. So when the system first comes on most of the water will go to the radiator with the shortest pipe run, once the thermostat rad valves on that radiator shut down, then the water will find the next easier option. So by turning down the “lockshield“ values (the value ...


4

There are different water heating systems, but I'd check if the the pump that is pushing hot water through the pipes is working. A circulating pump in a central heating system typically looks like this. You can tell if your pump is working by: Checking if the pipe is cold or hot each side of the pump. If it gets cold a foot or two after the pump, it is ...


4

I'm afraid your super is right. The supply valve must either be fully open or fully closed. If it is partially open, condensate cannot properly drain back to the boiler. It will collect in your radiator instead. How much heat is put out is regulated by the size of the vent valve. If the boiler works by central control, meaning the steam goes on and off for ...


4

You are correct that having a hot radiator on what's effectively a cold space - the porch - is very inefficient and, presuming nobody's on the porch most of the time, wastes a lot of energy. And you are correct that the hot water going into that radiator is being cooled in the process. However, it is unlikely that the water is going to any other radiators, ...


3

The metal mesh can usually be purchased in sheets at home improvements stores, then cut to size. A sheet isn't very expensive (last I looked, under $30). So, it is probably easier to just replace as opposed to taking it out and trying to cleanly remove the dent. More research shows they come in 3x3 sheets, and you'll want to ask for "decorative metal ...


3

From my experience with German systems: The whole system should be filled with water, with no air at all. The system pressure should be 2 bar or so. If it is not all filled with water, and the pressure is low, the air will collect at one point. When a healthy pressurized system has air, you will hear the bubbles moving about. When you bleed a ...


3

Don't change them. Single line steam radiators are tricky at the best of times, and most modern plumbers have little experience with them. In addition base board radiators make it impossible to put bookcases in. (In our climate they use up all of the external wall.) There are lots of ways to dress them up Recessing them is a bad idea, as the space to ...


3

To get your landlady interested, point out that the radiators are filled with moist, warm air, and that the system is corroding from the inside, shortening the life of the radiators and clogging the boiler with rust. That means the boiler's life is being drastically shortened and may soon cause a massive expense. Fixing it now would be much cheaper than ...


3

You may have a air lock in your pipes. Turn of all other radiator, and see if your pump is powerful enough to get water into the cold radiator. If this works, then you need to bleed it again.


3

To echo what @acrosman said, yes insulate the pipes. I'd suggest using fiberglass pipe insulation joined with foil tape, and loose fiberglass / PVC caps for turns. Wear a respirator. Cuts can be made with a sharp, long utility knife. here's an example:


3

The pipes should look like this: There should be an unrestricted flow around the system. Each radiator should be connected to both the flow (red) pipe and return (blue) pipe. The turnable value (or better still thermostatic valve) should be on the input to each radiator. There should be a simple on/off valve on the outlet which is normally set to fully ...


3

To answer your question, the radiators in your home are a closed loop. If they are single-pipe steam radiators, then there is a small amount of vapor loss out of the little valve on the radiator. (The one that may hiss a bit while warming up.) If you have that type of system, the water level in your boiler must occasionally be topped up, but that would be a ...


3

If the radiators are still hot you'll have to get the shut offs repaired first. The heat and the resulting drying action will raise havoc with the wood. The issue isn't so much a fire hazard as a drying hazard. The wood is going to shrink in the winter and expand in the summer. The seams and joints will split. I would also make the design so that you have ...


3

Low water Air lock or circulator not working is most common problems. What is the pressure of system ? Should be around 12 cold 20 hot. Add water to system if lower. You may have automatic feeder. Check for any air bleeder that can be open.


3

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


3

You could try using a portable fan to blow air across the radiator so that the room becomes more evenly heated. The moving air will actually extract more heat from the radiator than still air would, so you may find that this makes the room noticeably warmer.


3

Do you know for sure that this is a hot water system? Sometimes steam can sound like running water. If it is hot water, there is a giant air bubble in the radiator preventing it from filling. It needs to be bled off by opening the small valve near the top at one end. You will typically need some sort of tool or key for this. Slowly open the valve. Along with ...


2

Typical early style radiator heat is nothing like modern European style radiators. You should find out what originally came with the house to make the best fit. There is steam heat, water heat. The boiler may be powered by oil, natural gas, or (if it's really old) coal. As Joe mentioned, the radiators can be gravity powered or propelled with a ...



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