Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

No. It will not affect it. think of it like this, your softener's distributor tube is naturally 3/4" pvc or also known as 1.05" OD. So no matter what size your house pipe is, it will be reduced at the softener. It's a short distributor tube and the difference between a 1" and a 3/4" is very minimal.


0

I drilled down through the floor and installed carriage bolts through the floor with nuts on them.


1

Resurrecting an old thread, but another idea... 1/2" pvc pipe with 1/8" holes drilled. Then slide 1" sections of heat-shrink tubing over each hole and shrink to tight fit. Then poke a TINY hole (very fine needle) into the tubing. My concerns would be the shrink wrap tubing tearing out under too-high pressure (like, U.S. public line pressure), or the ...


0

There are two practical ways to deal with this. Before getting into details let me say that you should stop trying to join the trap parts of metal pipe to the trap parts of plastic pipe. Method 1. Remove the metal pipe with the J bend and complete the P trap with plastic parts. Then join the plastic pipe to the down flow drain system where the pipes are ...


4

Yes. I found an abandoned length of PVC pipe in the corner of my yard a while back and it was so brittle that it practically shattered from the pressure of holding it in my hand. This applies to basically all plastic. PVC, ABS, PEX, you name it. Plastics need to be protected from the sun or else they will embrittle. Paint them, or, better yet, use metal ...


5

I work in an environment that has 384 54W T8 fluorescent lamps and one PVC pipe. The pipe was unwrapped and began failing (crumbling apart) in 9 years. It wouldn't have held up to a someone bumping into it for probably a year prior to that, either. Your conditions will probably be less extreme, but it's a good idea to wrap or paint your pipe.


1

You will need to adapt from PVC to hose thread if using hose thread quick disconnects. If you can find pipe thread (on the fixed side) quick disconnects that would be one less fitting to adapt, as PVC to pipethread is a standard fitting, and I'm not aware of any direct PVC to hose thread fittings (may exist, I've never seen one) so I expect you'd need a ...


-1

I think just cutting the pipe and gluing it together is the best way to go in your situation. Dry fitting can still be hard to removed, as you've discovered! Also, PVC solvent does not melt surfaces to weld joints together. In fact it's easily unglued, should it ever need to be.


0

The Dremel cut wheel sounds like it would make a good fanned spray. Would make a cut that looks like some of the spray novels on the bissel carpet cleaners. But to drill and try to make a mist I would start with the smallest bit. Don't drill the whole way through. Just thin the wall till you can push a tack or needle through. My theory is that the shape of ...


0

Tighten the joint slightly. Pipe threads are tapered - the PTFE thread tape (or pipe dope - I'm currently more of a fan of PTFE pipe dope than of PTFE thread tape, though I used to be a big fan of the tape as opposed to old-style dope) provides a seal for the "helical leak path" (the fact that the female threads are a bit sharper than the top of the male ...



Top 50 recent answers are included