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Even a properly installed threaded copper x pvc connection will eventually have problems due to the differing rates or expansion/contraction + plastic embrittlement as it ages. That is not to mention that rarely is a plastic x metal threaded joint properly done to manufacturers specs. The plastic usually gets over tightened into the metal, leading to an even ...


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Why do I get the impression that PVC adhesive makers are against disclosing any information that might diminish their profits? Going to Home Depot or Lowe's gives one sticker shock when it comes to these "glues", and I've found online some PVC adhesives for as little as $7 for a whole pint. MEK (abbreviation for the chemical name of its solvent) can be used ...


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It could be a DIY project, PVC is easy to work with. Only thing you really need to watch out for is to make sure the new piping you install is CPVC. Neither Schedule 40 nor Schedule 80 PVC (the other most common kinds) are not legal for install inside the house in most jurisdictions. CPVC is also the only kind of PVC rated for hot water. That said, ...


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Yeah, a handy DIY person could do the re-routing of those hot and cold water line connections. You would have to deal with shutting off the water supply, cutting out all the old stuff and then re-plumbing in with new piping and fittings. Hopefully you get all the parts that you would need in one initial trip to the big box store. Do be aware as you get ready ...


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I see that you have a copper tube coil inside that enclosure. My guess is that the experiment you are trying to accomplish requires that to be copper? If so, is there a reason that you couldn't transition away from copper to PVC inside the enclosure? If that is an option, then you are left with sealing PVC to PVC which is much easier. Of course, you ...


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I too have struggled with gluing copper and PVC for certain experiments. Silicone is an ok choice, depending on the pressure, but white silicone just happens to be less effective for sticking to stuff than clear silicone... I don't really know why, I just know that it is. It's kind of too late to use anything else now that you put silicone on it (actually ...


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Being that you are repairing an unpressurized drain, the squareness of the pipe end is not nearly as critical as a pressurized supply line. Just make sure to clean and prime the pipe prior to applying solvent cement. Additionally, if you have a level handy, lay it across the drain once the fitting is in place to to ensure proper placement. Side note: It ...


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There is a tool that is made for cutting out the PVC pipe in a joint so that it may be used again. That tool may be useful to square up the end of the pipe in this case if you were able to hold the tool inline with the pipe while it shaves off the high part of the pipe. This is what one example of the tool looks like. These are used to chucking up the ...


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install a pvc union before the ball valve and use pipe dope (Teflon sealant) instead of the Teflon tape. http://www.homedepot.com/p/RectorSeal-T-Plus-2-4-oz-Teflon-Pipe-Thread-Sealant-23631/100201204


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You either have the wrong cutter or a bad blade. Even a new cutter could have a faulty blade. I use the attached cutter for all pvc and abs. http://www.toolup.com/Reed-TC3QP-Quick-Release-Tubing-Cutters-3-8-3-1-2


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I ended up taking the easy and slightly more expensive way out. I started by cutting out the stripped T at the lines below. Then I slid on a new 1/2" PVC-Lock FPT Tee Then I took a 1/2" PVC-Lock Slide Repair Fitting and made an additional cut just big enough to attach the slide fitting (fully compressed to be as small as possible) to the tee. Then I ...


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Schedule 80 will be required if exposed (above ground). Annex C of the NEC shows #8 THHN,THWN,THWN2; 3 wires in 1/2" and 5 wires in 3/4". You should be feeding the tub with a GFCI breaker.


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You have to cut the pipe. When re-installing you should put in unions instead of just couplings so that removing the pump is possible without disturbing the system, as the original installers should have. Since your piping is pretty tight you will need to do some re-piping. Here's an example:


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This looks all wrong. It looks like you have installed an adjustable P-trap upside down. The upside down "U" shaped piece attached to the pipe coming from the cabinet floor is supposed to be under the sink strainer. You need a proper tailpiece to attach to the strainer, which will come down into the "tall" end of the "U" shaped piece. The piece you now have ...


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just cut horizontally across the pipe that projects up from the cabinet base. cut it off about 3" up from the base, and then again about 2" up from the base. you have essentially removed a 1" section of pipe. then install a 1-1/4" fernco flexible coupling over the stub (up from the cabinet) and the remainder of the trap side stub. tighten the two gear ...



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