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2

This is actually quite simple. Step one - use PVC electrical conduit, not PVC pipe. Step two - provide an access point (such as an LB, or a junction box) for every 360 degrees (at most) of turn. This will be something that remains accessible by removing a panel when the walls are closed back up, like any other junction box access. If you have 6 90 degree ...


1

Don't worry, you can do it. There is a special tool that can be used to install a pull string in any 3" pipe no matter how many bends. It looks like this: Be sure to use lots of lubricant when you do the pull. Hmm, that came out sounding wrong.


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Depending how many bends are in the conduit it can be difficult to pull wires. Not having more than 360 degrees in the total is a good rule to follow. So as long as all your bends (90 degrees, plus 90 degrees, plus 90 degrees etc..) doesn't add up to more than 360, it should be good.


1

I'm assuming you're talking about not using proper plastic electrical conduit. If you want the capability of adding wires later, it sounds like the only solution with that many turns. Be sure to use the longest sweeps you can - normal vent 90's will not work. Many manufacturers make extra long sweeps for regular pvc that is not in the home center - ...


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I would try to include a couple of PVC cleanouts at a couple of the interior bends, ideally evenly spaced (eg. bend - cleanout - bend - bend - cleanout - bend). This way you could start a cable and pull it through the cleanout before feeding it back in and pulling to the next cleanout. This means each pull only has to traverse one or two bends at a time, ...


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While you're building the run, you can put a chase string in place, and use it to pull cables. You'll want a chase string to be 2x the total length of the run, and tie it off to each end of the run by tying it to an eye hook or a screw. Then it won't (generally) matter how convoluted the run is, you'll always have the chase string to guide wires from one ...


-1

No. It will not affect it. think of it like this, your softener's distributor tube is naturally 3/4" pvc or also known as 1.05" OD. So no matter what size your house pipe is, it will be reduced at the softener. It's a short distributor tube and the difference between a 1" and a 3/4" is very minimal.


0

I drilled down through the floor and installed carriage bolts through the floor with nuts on them.


1

Resurrecting an old thread, but another idea... 1/2" pvc pipe with 1/8" holes drilled. Then slide 1" sections of heat-shrink tubing over each hole and shrink to tight fit. Then poke a TINY hole (very fine needle) into the tubing. My concerns would be the shrink wrap tubing tearing out under too-high pressure (like, U.S. public line pressure), or the ...



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