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14

If this is a submersible pump in a fairly shallow well and it is running continuously and only putting out 20psi, you have several possible problems: The impeller assembly is coming apart and there is excessive internal leakage in the pump. There is a leak in the pipe leading from the pump to the well-head, either the pipe has split, or the barb fitting ...


8

There are many different solutions depending on how much you'd want to spend, how much DIY you want to do, and what exactly you are trying to achieve. I would not try to directly switch this load: inductive loads generate voltage spikes when switching them, which can damage electronics and such that are not designed to handle it. They also have high in-rush ...


6

Shop vac w/ the filters removed - suck the water right out of there, easy peasy, works every time.


5

This looks like it will work! Or maybe this one.


5

This is a popular way of remotely controlling a dust collection vacuum in a wood workshop. Sounds like what you are looking for.


5

If you will be drinking the water, you need a potable water pump. "Potable" means "safe to drink." No matter what, if needs to be able to start dry, you need a "self-priming" pump.


5

To answer the question in the title "Can disconnecting the cold switch on a shower pump save money?" The pump you linked to uses 345 watts. Assuming you use the cold water only in the bathroom for 10 minutes a day - cold tap, toilet flush, then you're looking at 5 hours per month at 345 watts. Call it 2 kilowatt hours. My local utility company charges ...


3

If the water needs to be potable, use materials (pumps, tubing, hoses, etc.) rated as potable. The problem is often leaching. Many materials, including metals and plastics that seem impervious, can leach dangerous materials (lead, other heavy metals, various plastic based chemicals), many of which have been shown to be health hazards, and more that are being ...


3

I believe that Grundfos comfort system is comprised of two parts: The Pump A special tee fitting The pump is installed on the outlet of the hot water tank and the special tee fitting is installed on the furthest fixture in the house from the hot water tank. This special fitting bridges the hot and cold water supplies. The basic concept is that when the ...


3

Disconnecting the cold water flow sensor certainly sounds like a reasonable idea. Try it and see if you get the desired result. Do use care when disconnecting as the sensor wiring may not be isolated low voltage circuitry. When the pump is deactivated you will want to evaluate fully whether the upstairs toilets and sink faucet water flow is adequate when ...


3

It depends on how much height difference more than length of hose. For a couple feet of lift, you can use a fountain pump. But if you need more speed and more lift, then a submersible utility pump will work. Note that the utility pump may not be designed for long term use, they are typically used for draining something that has flooded and then going back ...


3

Use gravity, all you need is a garden hose! If the pool is raised up on a deck or above surrounding areas, then you can siphon it out. This is exactly the same way fish tank owners get water out of their tanks. First get a garden hose that is long enough to end up in an area lower than the desired depth. Put the hose completely in the pool so it fills with ...


3

Well, if it's from the late 80s, then it shouldn't contain any PCBs. That liquid is probably a dielectric oil with a high viscosity. That would explain why you were thinking it's a solid. They're non-conductive mineral oils and as oil does, it displaces water. Treat it like a motor oil spill. Here's an MSDS sheet for Shell Morlina oil which is probably ...


3

This is a more complicated question than you've considered. To size a submersible pump, you need to know the total discharge head and the required flow rate. Part of the discharge head is calculated based on friction loss, which is based on the pipe diameter and length. In irrigation systems, the flow rate is dependent on the type and number of sprinkler ...


3

A couple things could be going on, as @bib and @BMitch allude: Your transformer could be putting out AC 12V instead of DC 12V. (Sometimes these are labeled VAC and VDC, respectively.) Your transformer may not be able to supply enough current to power the pump. The pump and transformer should both have their current listed (in the case of the transformer it ...


3

Low water Air lock or circulator not working is most common problems. What is the pressure of system ? Should be around 12 cold 20 hot. Add water to system if lower. You may have automatic feeder. Check for any air bleeder that can be open.


3

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


3

I doubt that it's #10, but even #12 can seem like a pretty thick wire when you're, even casually, used to #14. I'm surprised your pump receptacle doesn't have clamps instead of screws. Is it a 20 amp, twist lock, single receptacle? Without using force make sure the device screws are completely backed out, but don't remove them. Strip off about 1” of ...


2

Are you planning to build an entirely custom bath unit? Or modify an existing product? Most jetted tub manufacturers I've come across explicitly require certain pumps and void warranties if third-party pumps are used. For example, American Standard brand has the following in their installation doc: Do not make modifications to the whirlpool system ...


2

I don't know if this is really an answer, but I've had a Coleman 6 person spa in service for about 25 years. Yes, 25 years! I have never had the same problems you are experiencing. We learned early on that any clothing (bathing suits etc) must be very clean and rinsed extremely well before going into the spa. Clothes cleaning detergents left in the fabrics ...


2

Caulking is designed to keep water out of cracks. It remains relatively soft and pliable even after it sets up so that vibrations do not cause it to crack. One thing it does not have is great adhesion properties. If you've ever started peeling it you will know what I mean - it pulls off relatively easily. Because of this, I doubt it will hold up to water ...


2

You can make a siphon. Get a jar with a plastic lid. Get some surgical tubing. Drill two holes in the lid slightly smaller than the tubing. Insert a longer piece of tubing into one hole, pushing it down near the bottom. Insert a shorter piece on the other side, keeping the tub end nearer to the top of the jar. Put the other end of the long tube in the ...


2

There are GFCI outlets that have indicator LEDs on them, like this one: If you put this in the living space, then connect the sump receptacle (a normal, non-GFCI receptacle) to the "load" side of this outlet, it will also be protected. If it trips, the light will be out and you'll know it. To make it more obvious, you could plug a nightlight into this ...


2

If the ground-fault protection was provided by a GFCI breaker, you could plug a power outage alarm into the sump receptacle. If the GFCI breaker trips, the alarm will sound, and the homeowners will know they have to reset the breaker. You also might want to consider installing a backup water-powered sump pump. There is a great video from This Old House ...


2

A lot of good GFCI answers, but nothing (except Tester101 backup sump) addresses sump pump failure. A battery backed water alarm should be in the bag of tricks.


2

There isn't much to go on but I'll give it a shot. You say you switch the pump on and don't get water pressure. Given that you're trying to diagnose using a multimeter, I will assume the motor does not run. Between the leads to the unit and the motor there is a pressure switch (#1 on the parts diagram). It could have failed. More likely though is that the ...


2

Priming one will be a pain in the posterior, after which it will probably work until it loses prime. I know, because I've done it (well - almost - not a well, but a large amount of water from about 8 feet down). I'd suggest buying a pump that will be less of a pain in the rear to use if you are going to spend money on this. I did have a free pool pump ...


1

Sounds like a really odd setup you have there. The main water shutoff is between the pump and the pressure switch?? That is the only way that the pump would remain running like this. Water pressure in the house on the other side of the main water water shut off drops telling the pump to turn on. The pump stays running till the valve is opened again. Since ...


1

From looking this pump over and viewing the PDF documents on their website, the one major installation directive is that it must be installed with the shaft in a horizontal position. The Impeller housing can be installed in any position required by the plumbing installation by removing it from the pump motor and reassembling the pump with the terminal box ...



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