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6

Dangerous advice warning: As pointed out in the comments and other answers, this is the improper solution for a flared gas fitting. Just got back from the hardware store with this: It's apparently similar to Teflon tape that you would use on a water fitting, but made specifically for gas. There is also a compound available, but I chose to use the tape ...


4

Corrugated pipe is generally intended only to be used as the last connection to an appliance, in a living space where it not vulnerable to banging or jostling (usually behind or in a space at the bottom of an appliance), but where it can be seen and accessed if work is being done. It is not intended to be buried in a wall, where it could be pierced by a ...


4

Use of thread seal tape does not work on the fittings that screw directly into an aluminum propane regulator. I don't know if the changes in seasonal temperature cause the aluminum to contract and expand (or something else) but six months later the fittings will be loose and leaking. I suggest using a hardening compound.


3

You'll need to look into your local code to find out if it's approved. Where I live, compression fittings aren't allowed for gas but flared fittings are. If you're not sure, you should contact a licensed gas fitter in your area.


3

If the house is unoccupied it's likely "winterized", which may include disconnecting the fuel tank. You'll likely have to contact the home owner or fuel supply company, and make an appointment for them to meet you and reconnect the tank temporarily. DO NOT RECONNECT THE TANK YOURSELF. If you do not own the property, it is not yours to muck around with as ...


3

The tape you purchased is the correct tape for gas fittings. However, the fitting in your picture is a flared fitting. PTFE (Teflon) tape/pipe dope is only necessary on pipe thread fittings. This is because pipe threads are tapered - as you tighten the fitting, the threads bind together and deform slightly to create a seal. The pipe tape/dope helps ...


3

I cannot fully answer your question, but it seems that New Hampshire simply uses the ICC guidelines for building codes, including for "Plumbing, Mechanical and Fuel Gas" which seems to be the key area here. Not being an ICC member, I can't access the documents, and neither the New Hampshire Statutes website nor the State Building Codes website reprints ...


3

When I first read this, my first instinct was "don't", and I think that still holds. You are mixing water, electricity and possibly natural gas in a single untested design, and if anything goes wrong your pool could drain out, you could get electrocuted going in the water, or you could even end up with a bomb. It's not worth whatever costs you'd save ...


3

Where is the tankless water heater to be located? If it is in a space that is heated, then freezing will not likely be a concern as there will be plenty of heat gain through the equipment enclosure. If freezing is still a concern, look for a tankless unit that has a electric element for freeze protection. This will use a lot of energy if the unit is located ...


2

It's possible, but unless your furnace is way over sized, you can't just stick a heavier box in the same packaging and burn wood in it. You can reuse the duct work and blower, but everything else would need to be replaced. Depending on how much heat you need, it may not make sense to place the fire box where your furnace is. Further more, you may want to ...


2

You're question is vague and has a couple sub-questions, so let me offer a little Q&A: Q: Are there any central heating furnaces that use propane? A: Yes Q: Can I convert an existing natural gas furnace to use propane? A: Perhaps, but only with a manufactorer-approved adapter. Propane has more energy than natural gas does, so you must not just swap out ...


2

I'm not sure exactly where this pipe is, or how far back the pipe runs. Though most codes now call for a shutoff valve be installed for each appliance, in the same room and within 6' of the appliance. I'm going to assume that the piece of pipe you're looking to replace, runs from the shutoff valve to the appliance (this might be a terrible assumption, but ...


1

Your propane prices (and fuel oil, for that matter) are pretty steep. They're barely competitive with even simple, pure electric resistance heat. Even if the propane furnace manages to come out ahead of your oil system, there are electric systems that will be far cheaper to run. Some options to consider: Electric Thermal Storage - Using time of use ...


1

First, check to see if there are any tax breaks on the LP system for your area. My rule of thumb on energy savings savings is, it must pay off in less than 10 years or half of it's usable life (which ever is shorter). Since you have to replace the unit, see if the difference in cost - expected savings in energy over 10 years justifies going LP. A lot of ...


1

It's very common to use either hard-drawn or soft-drawn copper for gas, whether natural gas or propane. Using it for long runs is not generally the greatest of ideas, but I don't think there are any laws against it - the issue with soft-drawn for long runs is the risk that some idjit will hang something really heavy from it & kink it or outright break ...


1

I'd use a pair of Tongue-and-groove pliers, just be careful not to crank too hard.


1

no. the problem you find will be the odor of the gas, not the fire risk. Just air the room a little, you'll be good. keep the candles for the next day. Good idea put in a valve for next time.


1

Daniel, I will also add to the suggestions of hiring a professional. Run solid pipe though the walls. It will have to be cut the right lenght, threaded, and then assembled in place. The threads need sealant. The whole thing will be pressure tested (preferably overnight). Codes require things like a cut off valve near the appliance. With black pipe in the ...


1

Sounds like you should hire a qualified gasfitter. A properly connected compression fitting will not leak, but there's no point in DIY-ing gas lines if you're not 100% sure of your ability to get a leak free connection. Your propane supplier will usually either have people on staff, or know who to recommend locally.


1

I usually encourage DIY projects, but when it comes to gas applications, I have to strongly caution you to consider using a licensed gas installer to connect an on demand water heater. Nothing in a home is more dangerous than gas and it MUST be installed correctly and pressure tested. Venting the exhaust is extremely important as well, and a mistake can be ...


1

You are really asking a flow question. How many CFM (cubic feet per minute) does a given size pipe supply. The upper limit will be the meter capacity/ pipe size from the street. Each device has a max flow rating. Add them up and compare to the size piping you are planning to use. Increase the pipe diameter as necessary (up to the size coming in to the ...


1

Certainly you do that and it will work to some measure. However, if the heating equipment is designed for natural gas, it will require some adaptation to work successfully with propane. In many appliances a refit kit is available which alters the gas orifice. However, the practical reason this is not commonly done is that a 40 pound propane tank will ...


1

One major problem is that most propane regulators are intended for small appliances, mostly less than 75,000 BTUs/hr typical of an outdoor grill. The Rinnai V65EP can use up to 150,000, so a regulator designed for a little more than that would be the desired fit. Shopping around, I notice many don't say what their maximum flow rate is, and of those which ...


1

If the thermocouple is new, and we assume that it's good, then I'd wonder if it's positioned correctly? I don't know how your boiler is, with some of them you can re-position the TC with respect to the pilot, and it might be too far away. On a similar vein, are you sure it's locked in place and can't move? For instance, if it could vibrate around a bit, it ...


1

Call suburban, tell them that you don't want the tanks any more. Make sure you are present when they unhook so there is no damage to your connection. I recommend that you use a pair of tanks, so that there is always a spare on hand. One is disconnected and capped. (Bugs love to nest in the opening...) Note that for emergency heating you can go through ...


1

The short answer is all you need is a new orifice. The complicated answer is : don't do that. Ventless systems have been banned in various places, and come with significant hazards not fully mitigated by a carbon monoxide detector. Read for instance : ...


1

Simple answer - yes, it needs to be rated to supply gas. Two reasons: water molecules are bigger, so permeability is less of an issue for water, hence your hose pipe may actually allow gas to escape gas is explosive, so any mistake here may be considerably more serious than getting a water pipe wrong If you need guidance, call your local gas company for ...


1

The main difference between most torches is the maximum temperature it is capable of handling. So you can use propane as the fuel in MAPP torch (which burns hotter), for example. The second difference will be whether it uses compressed oxygen, or just the air around it. If it uses compressed oxygen it will burn hotter. Approximate burn temperatures ( as ...



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