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19

No, in general, you don't need to prime existing paint. To prepare for repainting: wash the wall to remove any grease. fill any holes and cracks with suitable filler, possibly using flexible filler for cracks. sand and prime the filled areas - priming will seal the filler and keep it in place. You might want to sand and reprime the whole wall to avoid a ...


12

I would just use a good stain covering primer like Kilz. I have used both KILZ 2® Latex Primer and KILZ® Premium Primer, the Premium version is noticeable better than the Kilz 2. But it looks like they have an even better version called KILZ MAX™ Primer. I have never used this one but it does mention covering nicotine: KILZ MAX™ is a water-based ...


12

Yes, you should prime the whole surface. Sealing/priming helps prevent penetration of vapors and moisture from the air into the drywall. If you don't seal the entire surface, even though it's behind cabinets, penetration can happen - mind you it's not going to be significant but it can happen. Plus the time involved to paint behind those cabinets that ...


10

I was quite skeptical about the paint and primer combo's, but Valspar gave me a couple of gals to try out. I was surprised how well it covered over dark colors. The down side was that it is not as smooth as regular premium grade paints. It seemed a bit dry going on, but that is because it is very high in clay content. I decided the best combo was to use ...


9

They make lead testing kits for this purpose. You should ensure that you understand the correct process and procedures for painting over lead paint and that you take the proper safety precautions. The EPA has a website with lots of information on this.


9

When you say you can see the brush marks, do you mean that they're actually irregularly surfaced? I mean - are we talking just a visual effect or an actual difference in the depth of the paint? If the latter, do a skim coat with lightweight joint compound and when it dries, either lightly sand OR smooth with a large, slightly damp sponge, then apply ...


9

Rule of thumb answer: always use primer. These days, however, you can buy paints that claim to be 'primer and paint all in one'. I tried some on the flat paint on our kids' walls and it seems to work good enough.


9

My dad and his dad were both professional union painters. They taught me that for small spots of spackle on the wall, all you have to do is put a quick layer of regular paint over them with a brush while you're doing your cutting-in brushwork. The spot over the spackle will be mostly dry when you go back over it with the roller later. I know from personal ...


8

Steven has given you the right info to test for lead. As a certified home inspector and licensed EPA Lead renovator, I question the method your inspector used to determine that there was lead paint present. He should have used a test swab for verifiable results. Assuming there is lead paint simply because over coated paint is cracking is making an ...


8

A better roller frame may actually be the right solution. I used this roller to paint most of my house after giving up on the cheap ones. It does a pretty good job of sealing the ends so that paint doesn't get inside to the rotating components. It's also got bearings to help it roll smoothly. Unfortunately, I've used it only with Behr interior eggshell ...


7

If you want a really nice job, get a drywall pole sander and give the wall a quick going over with 200-250 grit paper before priming, and before your final colour coat. Remember to wipe with a damp rag (use the pole sander if you like) before applying any paint/primer.


7

My favorite primer for wood doors is Bins Bullseye, pigmented shellac. This primer bonds well, hides wood grain well and gives a very smooth surface for top coats. If you prefer to stay with a latex product, then Kilz premium is good too. Remember prep is of the utmost importance for a good finish. Sand everything and clean it well before applying ...


7

Painting a pressure treated wood deck is always tricky. Pressure treated wood does not seem to hold paint well, even with a good primer. Stain is usually a better alternative, but since your deck already has paint, it would have to be stripped completely before using stain. In order for the paint to stick fairly well, the surface needs to be as clean and ...


7

I highly doubt a paint store sells what you are looking for. When you join two pieces of PVC, you aren't joining them together, but welding them together. PVC Cleaner (AKA Primer) cleans all dirt, and oils off the parts and soften them a bit, so they weld together properly and the glue can penetrate the PVC deeper. The glue then works on a molecular level ...


5

Yes. This fine plastering expert actually recommends it: If the surface is new, eliminate any possibility of coating failure by priming the surface in an oil primer, B-I-N SHELLAC BASE is preferred. Here is another expert plasterer doing the same.


5

The reason for waiting is to ensure that the plaster dries completely. If you paint over damp plaster the moisture has to still come out - through the paint causing it to bubble and come away. You will end up having to repaint at the very least. If you have only patched the wall then you should be able to prime and paint it sooner as there is less area to ...


5

Do not prime the drywall before it is taped and sanded. Do all your drywall work first, then apply your textured coating. Normally there is no reason to prime the new drywall or joints before putting on a compound based textured top coat. If you intend to use a textured paint instead of a compound based texture, then you would prime the entire surface with ...


5

Please yes! I am literally 90% done doing a complete remodel of my house. Other than the aluminum wiring that I have replaced the #1 biggest stupid thing I have dealt with is the 20 (no exaggeration) different types of wallpaper put on the house in 1967 during the custom build. Out of the 20 only 3-4 types (2 specific rooms) had primer. Those two rooms ...


4

If the holes are already patched and all your are doing is sanding it down to a smooth finish before you prime, it will be way less than 5 minutes per patch. Personally I would do it myself but how valuable your time is something only you can answer. If you get the sand paper made specifically for sanding joint compound (like this it will go really fast. ...


4

Priming is best. If you have to do two coats of paint to cover the old color, why not use a good primer or primer/sealer and one coat of a good paint? Most people will say otherwise, but primer will stick to old paint a lot better than new paint will. I recommend wiping the walls down with a damp cloth first, but it's a lot of work, and I've never done it ...


4

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


4

I would put on the baseboards, but only tack them in place so they can easily be removed when the drywall guy is done. The reason he is probably asking you to install them, is so he can make sure you are happy with the finish before he leaves so he doesn't have to come back. It's probably a good idea anyway, because it would be a shame to get all the ...


4

Shellac/alcohol based primers like Bulls Eye work great for sealing stains and odors in many applications, however they do put out a lot of alcohol fumes. Spraying increases the amount of volatile gases in the air and should only be used in a very well ventilated area and with proper protective respirators. You can actually get very intoxicated, legally ...


4

Agreed with all the "clean first" comments, but you might try tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) as your detergent, as it also etches the surface, providing a "nap" on the paint to make coats stick. My favourite primer for difficult situations is white pigmented shellac, like the B-I-N product mentioned, but there are generic off-brand versions that are cheaper. It ...


4

I've also had good luck with Zinsser B-I-N, which is shellac based. This might be overkill for your situation, but I've used it with great success on hard to cover stains.


4

Yes. The purpose of primer is to seal the raw plaster/gypsum/drywall and create a better surface for finish paint that won't soak it up. As long as the rest of the wall is properly cleaned before painting (paint doesn't bond well to dirt, grease, etc), your finish coat should look even and consistent. For your situation, assuming the existing paint was ...


4

Very simple, don't waste $$$ on fancy primers. For new drywall, do not use high hiding or shellac based primers. Use PVA sealer/primer. Amen! See my other answers on primers and sealers.


4

If you select boards with knots, there is a good chance that they will bleed through, even if you use a sealer or shellac based primer. The resins in knots is persistent. Clear boards are usually used for moldings, including baseboards. You could also use MDF (medium density fiberboard) or solid vinyl composite molding. When painted, they are hard to ...


4

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


4

The rule of thumb is you can use latex paints over oil primers and latex primers. Do not use oil based paints over any surface currently coated with a latex primer or paint. The oil based paint or primer will usually lift the latex product and leave you with a wrinkled surface that looks like alligator skin.



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